The Hawaiian Flag! 1883.

The Hawaiian Flag!

The Support of Hawaii!!

It is this symbol which honors you, O Hawaii; it is a mantle for you to have pride in; and above all things, it is the Support for the roof of your house, secured unwaveringly; and it is worthy of pride and boasting. Its awesome beauty as it flutters on the tips of the winds presents Hawaii across the four corners of this globe.

This symbol, a Flag, the affection for it is indelibly emblazoned in all peoples; and thus they are proud of and boast of the Flag of their own nation. Abuse of the flag of a nation is the abusing of the nation and its people. Rebellions, quarrels, and wars have been started between nations of this world because of the scorning and mistreatment of the flag of one nation by another.

Amongst all patriots, among the true natives who honestly prize their land of birth; amongst those who stand steadfast behind their own nation; it is a lei and a cherished thing; yes; it is not only there that their thirst of aloha for their flag is quenched, but there is so much more—for its waving in victory is the Support [Koo] which sustains their independence by way of their nation. Continue reading

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Look at what is happening soon after the overthrow, 1893.

THE BEAUTIFUL FLAG OF HAWAII.

MAY YOU WAVE FOREVER.

You may obtain the glorious flag of our land from the hands of the Secretary of the Hawaii Holomua, Mr. Thomas. K. Nakanaela. All those who have aloha for the Independence of the Land, come and get flags for yourself lest they run out.

(Hawaii Holomua, 4/3/1893, p. 2)

KA HAE NANI O HAWAII.

Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 192, Aoao 2. Aperila 3, 1893.

Hawaiian Flag Handkerchiefs, 1893.

HAWAIIAN FLAG.

We were shown some silk handkerchiefs printed with the Hawaiian Flag by Mr. Charles Girdler; this is a haole, who is with the Hawaiians in the difficulties of the land these days; these are truly beautiful handkerchiefs, and because they are dyed color fast, they can be washed.

His tiny shop is next to the attorneys’ office of Akoni Rosa, Enoka, and Kahookano, on Kaahumanu Street. They will be gone in a few days.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 7/21/1893, p. 2)

HAE HAWAII.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 731, Aoao 2. Iulai 21, 1893.

Castle and Cooke flies the Hawaiian Flag, 1894.

THE HAWAIIAN FLAG AT CASTLE AND CO.

It is an astonishing thing to see the Hawaiian Flag at the shop of Castle and Co. [Kakela ma], up on the flagpole, where the American flag was placed for 18 or more months. And these days, the Flag is seen waving from the flagpole; how fickle is this; what is with this action by Castle and Co.

It perhaps will be said that this is the flag of the Republic, but we say that such is not the truth, it is simply running away and hiding, just like what the Supreme Court Justice stated, that the “Peacock Government” [Aupuni Pikake] governs under the Hawaiian Flag; they are frightened of the Lion [England] these days.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 7/11/1894, p. 2)

KA HAE HAWAII, MA KAHI O CASTLE MA.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 980, Aoao 2. Iulai 11, 1894.

Different view of the seal of the republic, 1896.

Great Seal of the Republic of Hawaii.

In today’s P. C. Advertiser (February 25), a picture of the Great Seal of the Republic of Hawaii was printed.

By our understanding of that image, there is no way that those who established this Republic can erase or end or eradicate visages of the Monarchy and its accomplishments, from the seal mentioned above.

They stated and vowed that there will be no way that the reestablishment of the Kingdom of Hawaii nei will be allowed. However, when they set out to create a Seal for their Government. And now, that foolish idea of the plunderers and thugs has gone awry.

Being that, (1.) On that Great Seal, is the foundation of the first Seal of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei. (2.) There is the stripes of the Hawaiian Flag of the Monarchy. (3.) There stand puloulou, a symbol of the Hawaiian Monarchy of old. (4.) There is an image of Kamehameha I., the King who unified the Hawaiian Archipelago into one Nation. (5.) There are the words—”Ua Mau ke Ea o ka Aina i ka Pono” affixed onto this new Seal, the words given by King Kamehameha III after the restoration of the Independence of Hawaii nei by Great Britain.

All these things were from the Great Seal of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei (except Kamehameha I.)

The new things added are these. (1.) Rays of the Sun. (2.) The image of Kamehameha I. (3.) The image of the Goddess of Victory. (4.) The Star. (5.) The Phoenix Bird, and (6.) The words, Republic of Hawaii.

Their intense desire is to rub out, to stomp out, and to end for all time, things of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei, lest vestiges of that sort remain in Hawaii; but that is not possible: there is no erasing, nor putting end to deeds done by the past Monarchs of Hawaii.

We know the story of the Phoenix, but it is not the same as the explanatory speech by P. C. Jones at the Armory [Hale Paikaukoa] in the year 1893, and these are his words:

“Once, Mrs. Kinau Wilder [Waila] went to where Ostrich were raised near Diamond Head [Laeahi]. One of the birds of the French Doctor Trousseau laid an egg, and it was on that occasion given to Kinau, and the egg was called Kinau. However, it was left there to be sat on by a bird until it hatched.

“This is similar to this Republic,” according to Jones. “It was born like that egg, Kinau.”

There is one unfortunate thing about that egg called by the name of Kinau, that being, it was a rotten egg [huaelo]. There was no chick born from that egg.

Jones didn’t know of the outcome of that egg, for it was but a yolk-less egg [hua makani], a hua laalaau?, a worthless egg.

Perhaps this will be the outcome of the Republic to which he compares it to? But at any rate, that is the kind of Ostrich egg that Kinau chose.

The shell of that astonishing egg is kept at the residence of Trousseau [Kauka Farani] in Makiki.

This astonishing Ostrich is not the same as a Phoenix which rises from the ashes.

(Aloha Aina, 2/29/1896, p. 4)

Ke Sila Nui o ka Repubalika o Hawaii Nei.

Ke Aloha Hawaii, Buke II, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Feberuari 29, 1896.