Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society and the importing of plants and animals, 1865.

[Communicated.]

Mr. Editor:—The eminent success which has attended Dr. Hillebrand’s first consignment of plants and birds per Alberto for the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society, ought certainly to operate as a stimulus to all who feel interested in the material progress of these islands, to lend a helping hand to enable him to avail freely of the facilities and opportunities he now possesses of procuring and forwarding here the vast number of plants, &c., suitable to our climate, Continue reading

The Royal Hawaiian Band to lose old-timers, 1920.

WANTS TO RETIRE AND RECEIVE A PENSION.

After working as a musician in the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] for 51 years, James Pohina, one of the oldest persons working with the band, decided he was at a place where he would retire with a pension from the county government. Continue reading

John Kalaukoa and David Kanuha acquitted of treason, 1895.

TWO ARE ACQUITTED.

PAIR OF PRISONERS ORDERED RELEASED BY THE COURT.

John Kalaukoa and D. Kanuha—Cases Against them and Defense Presented.

John Kalaukoa and D. Kanuha, charged with treason and open rebellion, have been acquitted. They have been released from custody by order of the Military Commission. Continue reading

On neutrality, 1865.

Hawaiian Neutrality.

Our “Query” of last week has received a response from one of the Government organs, a reply however by no means satisfactory.

The fling is entirely amiss, that we are not acting the part of Hawaiians, but of Americans, in speaking of this nation as weak, and its acts as having no great effect abroad.It is because we love Hawaii, weak as she is, that wewould have her for her own sake avoid following the bad example of other nations, and would also have her prompt in following their good examples. Continue reading

Aloha Aina, 1923 / Today.

The obituary of Frank Pahia made me remember a post I saw from Kanaeokana a few days ago. Lately we have been seeing so much corruption and abuse of government positions. Where are the Frank Pahias of today?

Another tool in our aloha ‘āina arsenal

An interesting political movement is underway, and many of us haven’t noticed it even though it is happening right here, close to home. Kānaka Hawaiʻi are turning out in greater and greater numbers to run for their neighborhood boards.

On Oʻahu, neighborhood boards have become one of the latest frontiers of mālama ʻāina. It’s easy to feel like your lone voice can’t change how things are going, but neighborhood boards give you a say in dealing with localized issues taking place right where you live. Your area’s legislators often attend in person, giving you more direct access to them. Even the Governor, Mayor, and the state’s federal delegation in Washington D.C. send representatives to local board meetings.

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