Women of Kauai represent! 1893.

THE WOMEN OF KAUAI

Memorialize Commissioner Blount—They Ask for Restoration.

The following is the text of a memorial which was presented to Commissioner Blount on Monday last, May 15th, by Mrs. Lovell, acting as a Committee of the Women’s Patriotic League of the Island of Kauai. The memorial was signed by 809 Hawaiian women residing on Kauai. It was read to the Commissioner by Mrs. Junius Kaae of this city, through whose efforts the organization was formed on Kauai, and who recently made a circuit of that island to secure the names attached to it. The Commissioner is reported to have spoken most approvingly of the tone and spirit of the memorial, and of the patriotism of the Kauai women in sending it forward.

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Memorial of the Ladies of Kauai, 1893.

Ka Memoriala a na Lede

O KA

Mokupuni o Kauai.

I ka Meahanohano

James H. Blount

Elele Pili Aupuni o Amerika Huipuia ma Hawaii nei.

Me ka Mahalo:—

O makou o ka poe no lakou na inoa malalo iho nei, ke noi a ke hoike aku nei me ka haahaa imua ou penei:

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Fish prices regulated, 1918.

PRICES FOR FISHES ARE SET BY THE FOOD COMMISSIONER, CHILD.

This past Saturday, the rules of the food commissioner of Hawaii nei, Child, went into effect, in that the prices for different fishes will be set, not like before when fish was so expensive that some people could not afford fish for them and their families. Continue reading

Not just February, 1938, Today, Tomorrow.

Need to Care For

A petition was put before the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] of Maui on this past Monday, May 15, and it was about the obvious truth of the sad acknowledgement by the kamaaina of Hawaii, about the quiet decline of the Hawaiian language.

This document was sent from Molokai, one of the bastions of the old Hawaiians, and the document was written in the Hawaiian language, and it is something important taken and considered by the members of the board, the press, and others who went to observe the meeting. Continue reading

W. D. Alexander on crown lands, 1893.

Assisting with Land Rights

The Crown Lands [Aina Leialii] were lands of Kauikeaouli that he set aside for himself and his descendants, when he divided the lands of his Kingdom between himself, the Alii, and the makaainana. In 1865, it was decided by the Supreme Court [Ahahookolokolo Kiekie] that these lands would be inherited by the person who sits on the Throne. The Legislature just passed a law to establish a managing Commission which will put these lands in order. Being there are no descendants of Kamehameha I that are living, therefore, the lands will now go to the people, that is they were released by the Legislature to help the Chief Executive [Luna Hooko kiekie] in his office.

Being that this office is no more and is of naught at this time, those lands are under the jurisdiction of the Government. Continue reading

Faith, 1893.

THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE.

The Hawaiian people have faith in the righteousness and the justice of the Americans; therefore they have great trust that Minister Willis will come and make right the outrageous offense that Minister Stevens and Captain Wiltse committed against this upright peoples. Therefore the Americans will dispense justice for Hawaii in 1893 just as Great Britain did too in 1843. Continue reading