On neutrality, 1865.

Hawaiian Neutrality.

Our “Query” of last week has received a response from one of the Government organs, a reply however by no means satisfactory.

The fling is entirely amiss, that we are not acting the part of Hawaiians, but of Americans, in speaking of this nation as weak, and its acts as having no great effect abroad.It is because we love Hawaii, weak as she is, that wewould have her for her own sake avoid following the bad example of other nations, and would also have her prompt in following their good examples. Continue reading

Advertisements

German naturalist Dr. Beratz sees Maunakea, 1870.

[Found under: “A European Traveler’s Account of a Trip over Hawaii.”]

[“]On our ascent to the top of  Mauna Kea, we visited the little lake called Waiau, situated at an elevation of circa 12,000 feet, in a depression formed between the numerous snow covered peaks of the mountain. The lake was covered over with a crust of ice, two to three inches thick, but not strong enough to skate upon. To find ice in the tropics strikes the traveler with surprise, and here we feel inclined to play with it like children. Continue reading

Critique of the immigration policy, 1869.

The Hawaiian Coolie Trader, the Bark Maunaloa.

The Bark “Maunaloa” has been fitted out by the Hawaiian Government for a cruise among the various groups of the South Pacific, for the purpose of obtaining coolies for service upon our sugar plantations.

Our next door neighbor, Mr. Damon, in the “Friend” of this month, pronounces his benediction upon the bark, and bids the enterprise God-speed. We can neither say amen to his benediction, nor join with him in wishing the enterprise success. Continue reading

On advertising in the Kuokoa, 1869.

A word to the wise and a word for ourselves.

We need not remind our friends engaged in mercantile pursuits of the importance of  advertising as a means of insuring success in business. But for our mutual profit, we will remind our friends of the business community of the superior advantages that our columns afford for a large class of advertisements. Continue reading

John L. Stevens’ outrageous impudence, 1893.

HAWAII BELONGS TO THE HAWAIIANS.

The administration at Washington has the unqualified support of this magazine (The Illustrated American) in its course of conduct in the Hawaiian affair.In acknowledging the tremendous wrong committed by ex-Minister Stevens, while acting as the nation’s, representative at the Court of Queen Liliuokalani, President Cleveland and his Secretary of State have shown splendid courage and refreshing disdain of buncombe. All the facts in the case proves Stevens’ behavior while Minister at Honolulu to have been prompted by rank ignorance or complete disregard of right or decency. Stevens openly encouraged a portion of the Queen’s subjects in their preparations for rebellion and promised them every possible material assistance, the moment they furnished him with the shadow of an excuse for such a step. Continue reading

Hui Oiwi o Kamehameha, 1943.

[Found under: “News From Boys, Girls Kamehameha School]

By CARL THOENE

Alexander Minoaka Thoene has been elected kahuna nui of Hui Oiwi, the Hawaiian club, at the Kamehameha School for Boys. Minoaka, who is a senior, has been a member of the club since 1939. Norman Lunahooponopono Rosehill has been chosen kahuna, and William Kahuelani Stewart is now the club’s kakauolelo. Howard Kalani Benham has been chosen puuku and Edwin Mahiai Beamer has been re-elected alakai himeni. Continue reading