Birthday of Charles Reed Bishop, 1909.

BIRTHDAY OF BIHOPA COMMEMORATED.

This past Monday Charles R. Bishop became eighty-seven years old, one of the old haole of Hawaii nei who Hawaii greatly is in debt to for his efforts to search for and to work for the welfare and the progress of Hawaii nei. Continue reading

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Charles Reed Bishop honored at Kamehameha Schools, 1946.

Arrived 100 Years Ago

Kamehameha To Honor Memory Of C. R. Bishop

Charles Reed Bishop, a builder of Hawaii in the field of education as well as business during the 19th century, and who arrived in the Hawaiian Islands 100 years ago this week, on October 12, 1846, will be remembered at centennial services at the Kamehameha Schools Friday and Saturday. Continue reading

Founder’s Day, 1894.

IT IS FOUNDER’S DAY.

FORMAL OPENING OF GIRLS’ SCHOOL AND THE MUSEUM ANNEX.

Exercises In Bishop Hall—Addresses By Col. W. F. Allen, Mrs. Haalelea, Miss Pope.

This is Kamehameha School Founder’s Day. It is the anniversary of the birth of that noble woman, Bernice Pauahi Bishop. This Hawaiian calendar feature was marked by the formal opening of the Kamehameha School for Girls and the Chas. R. Bishop Museum Annex.

The exercises began at 2 o’clock this afternoon. With the literary program, the sports and viewing the new school and the Annex, to say nothing of the manual training department, there were visitors on the grounds till after 3 o’clock. Continue reading

Deer from Molokai gifted by C. R. Bishop to a California zoo, 1893.

SOME FAWNS.

The steamer Mokolii brought from Kalae, Molokai, two young Deer.

These young Deer will be sent all the way to California, for a Zoo in that state of the United States. The fawn are spotted white and red.

According to the Captain of the steamship Mokolii, about these young Deer, they are a gift of C. R. Bishop to a Park in California, for these Deer are not seen in America; only red deer are seen there, not these type; and therefore they are being taken there. To be proliferated in America. Continue reading

Still Our Museum Today! 1900.

OUR MUSEUM

The Bishop Collection of Curios.

One of the Most Interesting Sights In Honolulu Pleasantly Described.

HONOLULU, Feb. 8.—Above the inner entrance to the Museum of Hawaiian and Polynesian History is a tablet of polished mottled stone, in which is engraved in letters of gold the following inscription:

To the Memory of
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP,
FOUNDER OF THE KAMEHA-
MEHA SCHOOLS OF HO-
NOLULU.
A Bright Light Among Her Peo-
ple; Her Usefulness Survives
Her Earthly Life.

A Bernice Pauahi, she was related to the royal family of the Kamehameha dynasty, and the cousin of Queen Emma, two women who have indelibly inscribed their names upon the hearts of…

BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP.

…all Hawaiians, whether by birth of association. She married the Hon. C. R. Bishop, and with her immense wealth and her kindly deeds through life, created a new life among the Hawaiians. Upon her death she left most of her wealth to endow the Kamehameha Schools, a separate school for boys and a separate one for girls. These schools are kept up entirely from the income of her estates, which have become so vast as to render it necessary to erect other buildings throughout the Islands in order to expend the revenue. In memory of his wife, the Hon. C. R. Bishop dedicated the museum in her name, laying aside a princely endowment. Collectors have scoured the Hawaiian Islands for curios of historical and intrinsic value and have succeeded by the most diligent effort and at great expense, in depositing in the museum an invaluable collection of ancient materials which would warm the cockles of the antiquarian’s heart beyond measure. Calabashes, large and small, ancient and modern, have come into the museum; some were in the possession of families, relics passed from one generation to another; others were found in the caves where in ancient times were buried kings and chiefs. Idols of grotesque shapes, dedicated to all the elements of nature, good and evil; some dedicated to Pele, the Goddess of Volcanoes; others to the poison god and to the fish god; some made of stone, others of the valuable koa and kou woods; one made of the trunk of the poison tree, its wood, upon being steeped in water, being a most powerful, yet undetectable poison which acts upon the heart, and which was used by the kahunas and chiefs. Beautiful feather cloaks of wonderful sheen and delicate texture, worn by Kamehameha the Great during his tour of conquest a century ago. Continue reading

C. R. Bishop turns 87, 1909.

CHARLES R. BISHOP THANKS THE CHAMBER

Charles R. Bishop, the founder and first president of the Honolulu Chamber of Commerce, to whom a congratulatory cablegram was sent on January 26, last, writes to the Chamber as follows:

“Many thanks to the Honolulu Chamber of Commerce for congratulations and best wishes on this the eighty-seventh anniversary of my birth. Wishing the Chamber continued efficiency and prosperity, I remain, yours very truly,  CHARLES R. BISHOP.

[C. R. Bishop is widely known for his involvement in many great endeavors, but he might not be so well know for his founding of the Chamber of Commerce which is still active today.]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 2/12/1909, p. 3)

HawaiianGazette_2_12_1909_3

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume LI, Number 117, Page 3. February 12, 1909.