A little too late for Love’s Bakery, but not for other local businesses, 2022.

Help Local Businesses.

Rebuilt was Love’s Bakery, located at Pauahi and Nuuanu Streets. They have new cracker making machines, and they are baking soft soda crackers and saloon pilot crackers. These are better than the crackers from other lands. Hawaiians should buy items made locally.

(Na’i Aupuni, 3/12/1908, p. 2)

Ka Na’i Aupuni, Buke V, Helu 51, Aoao 2. Maraki 12, 1908.

Salt, 1860.

Salt from Puuloa.

From old times, Hawaiians knew how to make salt. It was used to season food and to trade with, and yet the salt from Hawaii was not very good. Beef or pork salted with this salt was not so good. If it was left for a while, it would rot. Now however, the salt made at Puuloa is very good; the bitter contents are removed, and they have a mill that grinds it like flour, and like salt from foreign lands. Therefore, the salt from Puuloa is under great demand; it is exported and the land profits.

(Hae Hawaii, 7/25/1860, p. 70)

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 5, Ano Hou.—Helu 17, Aoao 70. Iulai 25, 1860.

Salt from Halekou, Kaneohe, 1890.

SALT FOR SALE.

Here at Halekou, Kaneohe, Koolaupoko, is very nice salt for sale to anyone who wants to buy. Consultation is pleasant, and prices are reasonable, whether it be for a bag, or two, or more, or a ton. I can be found at Halekou, Kaneohe, Koolaupoko, or if not me, my wife.

CHARLES I. HIRAM.

(Ko Hawaii Paeaina, 2/8/1890, p. 3)

Ko Hawaii Paeaina, Buke XIII, Helu 6, Aoao 3. Feberuari 8, 1890.

Frogs, 1903.

The Business of Raising and Selling Frogs.

Representative Andrade said he will build a frog breeding grounds in some of his taro patches at Manoa, And according to him, the requests for frog legs for eating in this town is increasing. Currently, Hilo is where frog is eaten a lot, and when Honolulu people see the progress of those in this business, they will think of building a place to raise those animals.

Mr. Andrade believes that profits from this business will grow and he will start this venture in Manoa, and according to him, it will not be long for Honolulu people to wait before they will see his juicy frog on tables at restaurants in town.

(Kuokoa, 7/17/1903, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLI, Helu 29, Aoao 5. Iulai 17, 1903.

Lava Drawings by Nawahi and John L. Reese, 1881.

[Found under: “KELA ME KEIA.”]

There are two Lava drawings in the window of Whitney and Robinson, drawn by Hon. Joseph Nawahi, at Hilo, and the other was drawn here in Honolulu by the caricaturist, J. L. Reese (Keoni Liki). It is said that these are very beautiful; and we hope these experts will continue with this work.

(Elele Poakolu, 7/13/1881, p. 1)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke II, Helu 19, Aoao 1. Iulai 13, 1881.

How many paintings did Nawahi actually do?

[Found under: “KELA ME KEIA.”]

In the window of the book store of Whitney and Robinson, there are a number of beautiful paintings drawn and painted by Hon. Joseph Nawahi of the lava that is frightening Hilo.

(Elele Poakolu, 7/6/1881, p. 1)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke II, Helu 18, Aoao 1. Iulai 6, 1881.

Market for Kukui, 1865.

KUKUI NUT, KUKUI NUT.

KNOW ALL PEOPLE in the countryside, I am the one whose name appears below, a friend of yours in times past, who purchased Tree Ear. That season is over and it is a NEW AGE, and I putting out the call that I am purchasing KUKUI NUTS that are baked until done and then all shelled; just bring in the MEAT cleaned under the sun and dried well. I will pay THREE DOLLARS AND A HALF ($3.50) for a single barrel. For those who seek this, bring it; I will be found in the stone building of M. Kekuanaoa, at AIENUI. BE QUICK, DO NOT DELAY!

CHUNG HOON & CO.
Aienui, Honolulu, May 1, 1865.

(Kuokoa, 5/4/1865, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 18, Aoao 3. Mei 4, 1865.

Whaling ended in 1859?

A Large Pamuela

Off the island of Lanai this past Tuesday, the whaling ship Triton caught a whale called a Pamuela [sperm whale], and the value of the boiled down 100 barrels of oil is a blessing for the seafaring boys. The oil from this kind of fish is one of the best, and it fetches a high price. Its oil is not like that of the other whales of the sea. The number of barrels are but a few, but the $7,500 gain is great. They return weighted down, their pockets rustling.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 3/12/1891, p. 2)

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 148, Aoao 2. Maraki 12, 1891.

Memorial Day, 1908

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

Don’t forget to get ready while you can with decorations for the coming Memorial Day; your needs can be satisfied at Hawaiian Nursery, at 1812 Punchbowl Street.

(Kuokoa, 5/15/1908, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 20, Aoao 5. Mei 15, 1908.
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More on bees and the man known to Hawaiians as Okamu haole, 1897.

An Industry That Has Made Rapid Strides.

It would be a difficult thing to fix the date of the beginning of the bee industry in the Hawaiian Islands. As far back as the “oldest inhabitant” can run his thoughts, honey has been gathered in the mountains. Back in the ’60s one of the characters of the city was Dwight Holcomb, known to the small boys and natives as “Old Oakum.” He was an eccentric individual and was the “bogie man” to the young boys of that time. Continue reading