Evan da Silva Political Ad—a Mix of Hawaiian and Western Idioms, 1920.

CANDIDACY ANNOUNCEMENT

I am once again putting my name before the voters of the First Voting District of the Island of Hawaii, and asking for your support on this Election Season coming up on the 2nd of October, 1920. My work at the Legislature these past sessions was putting effort into and watching over our rights, O makaainana from the reclining coconut trees of Kalapana all the way to the sheer trails of Hamakua.

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Whaling ended in 1859?

A Large Pamuela

Off the island of Lanai this past Tuesday, the whaling ship Triton caught a whale called a Pamuela [sperm whale], and the value of the boiled down 100 barrels of oil is a blessing for the seafaring boys. The oil from this kind of fish is one of the best, and it fetches a high price. Its oil is not like that of the other whales of the sea. The number of barrels are but a few, but the $7,500 gain is great. They return weighted down, their pockets rustling.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 3/12/1891, p. 2)

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 148, Aoao 2. Maraki 12, 1891.

O ku, o ka, o ku, o ka… 1908.

[Found under: “Ka Moolelo Kaao o Hiiaka-i-ka-Poli-o-Pele”]

Then Hiiaka replied, “If you really want to go with the two of us, you can take your young pig. There is but a short distance before you reach the crater. The crater is right there upland. You will find us in no time.”

“It is a tribute, like an uku, a fish from Kahoolawe,” replied Wahineomao, continuing on, “But there is one problem. Maybe when I get back, I will not find the two of you.”

“No. You will find us,” answered Hiiaka. “And when you are making the climb, say o ku o ka, o ku o ka, and keep doing that until you reach the crater. Continue reading

On the passing of Mileka Paia, 1920.

AN EXPRESSION OF ALOHA.

MRS. MILEKA PAIA.

To the Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, aloha nui oe:—Please may you be patient in inserting in an open space of the columns of the esteemed newspaper of the lahui so that the many intimates and friends will know, and it shall be the speedy messenger pigeon that carries to all the neighborhoods of our islands, from where the sun arrives at Haehae until where it sets at the base of Lehua, that Mrs. Mileka Paia has passed, the lehua blossom has faded; she sleeps the sleep of summer and winter; the lehua scattering rain of Panaewa will no more sprinkle upon her, the Kanilehua rain will no more mist upon her cheeks, the lehua lei of Olaa will no more adorn her; and following her are mounds of tears being cried for her constantly night and day, while trying to calm the aloha that cannot be calmed, for she is gone, no more will we see her and hear her voice. Auwe, how heart wrenching! Continue reading

Waters that cause one to droop.

This is similar to the saying about Pāʻieʻie in Hilo:

Luhe i ka wai o Pāʻieʻie. “Drooped over the pool of Pāʻieʻie.”

I seems Hilo was the place for that wai hooluhe.

[By the way, if you already did not know, ʻŌlelo Noʻeau is back in print! See the Bishop Museum Press website to order your copy!]

Mary Kawena Pukui, “ʻŌlelo Noʻeau: Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings” Bishop Museum Press.