Linohaupuaokekoolau! The importance of old newspapers. 1942.

[Found under: “Meahou O Na Kohala Ame Hamakua”]

Before I forget this; this is something to instruct everyone reading Ka Hoku—keep your Hoku newspapers; do not discard of them in the outhouse [lua liilii] or your rubbish cans. Continue reading

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More alii going to fish for upapalu, 1869.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

Fond of fishing.—The moonlit nights of this past week were spent by some makaainana and alii by going fishing outside of Honolulu Harbor, in lagoons and other places they wanted to fish. The fishes they caught  were upapalu, u-u, aweoweo, moi, awa, and alalauwa. Continue reading

This is some fishing story! 1893.

LETTERS

[We do not wish to carry the responsibility for the errors of the ideas printed below this title by our writers.]

The Starving Ones in the Upland are Saved, a Strange Fish was Landed.

O Kuokoa Newspaper

Aloha to you and your metal type setting boys, and your Editor.

Please take around those words placed above.

On Monday, the 4th of this month, a large strange fish was landed in Ewa; a fish of the deep sea.

And this is the story on that early morning of that day mentioned above. Continue reading

Kawaiahau Glee Club performs at Progress Hall, 1904.

A NIGHT OF PLEASURE OF HALALII.*

The Kawaihau Glee Club announced that it will hold a night of pleasure of Halalii at Progress Hall, on the Ewa corner of Beritania and Fort Streets, tomorrow night. The club will get together with all its eighteen members, offering their merry voices and joyous music, while those who go there will spin with their partners. Continue reading

Newspapers can’t survive on just aloha, 1918.

Mrs. Becky Wilkinson of Kahului paid for the life of her Hoku, all the way until May 1919. This is tremendous confidence for which we give our greatest aloha. Who else will follow this good Mother of the rising and falling seas of Kahului.

[The last Hawaiian language newspaper, Ka Hoku o Hawaii, will decrease to a two page format from 5/6/1942 and prints its final issue in 1948.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/24/1918, p. 2)

HokuoHawaii_1_24_1918_2.png

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 12, Helu 35, Aoao 2. Ianari 24, 1918.

Turn your hands down, 1925.

[Found under: “1925 1926”]

Good works for the Kingdom of God, strive to enter into those works; for they will help you with your life. Here are the church steeples pointing upward towards the good hope of rebirth, and it would not be detrimental to you O Dear reader to join in works of the Kingdom of God here on earth.

Good works that will benefit you on earth, are those activities that will be good for you and your loved ones upon the earth; do not be ashamed to put your hands down into the earth to grow good things from Mother earth that will bless your life upon the earth. Continue reading

Arrests being made for disturbing the peace? 1892.

“HOOKAHI NO HAWAE LAUHUE KONA.”*

This past Friday, the Government began arresting people thought to be taking part in activities that go against the good and the peace of the Nation, and these are the names that we obtained. The Hon. Wilcox, the Hon. J. W. Bipikane, Mr. V. V. Ashford, and many others.

*An olelo noeau speaking to the wide-reaching power of a single entity.

(Hawaii Holomua, 5/21/1892, p. 3)

HawaiiHolomua_5_21_1892_3.png

Hawaii Holomua, Buke II, Helu 21, Aoao 3. Mei 21, 1892.