The grand celebration of the 64th birthday of Princess Ruta Keelikolani Keanolani Kanahoahoa Muolaulani Keikiheleloa Keanohalia Kaleonahenahe Kohalikolani at her newly completed Keoua Hale, 1882.

Birthday of Her Royal Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.

Her Royal Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani celebrated, on Thursday last, her sixty-fourth birthday by a luau, or banquet in native Hawaiian fashion, given at H. R. H.’s new mansion in Emma-street, followed on the evening of Friday by a Reception and Ball. The occasion was indeed adopted for the “house-warming” the handsome and beautifully decorated house being only just ready for occupation. The event has been long talked of, and looked forward to, and has been the chief topic of conversation during the past week, almost to the exclusion of all others, causing the exciting events of the previous week to fall quite into the background.

The Mansion which was the scene of these festivities is situated on the land known as Kaakopua, which has a long frontage to the Ewa side of Emma-Street. It is a handsome structure of two main stories, on a high basement with an attic story and turret above. On the main floor on the mauka side of the house, are two drawing rooms which communicate with one another by a wide arch. Continue reading

Advertisements

More on prolific Charles Furneaux, 1881.

Mr. Furneaux’s Paintings.

A very interesting series of oil paintings by Mr. Furneaux is to be seen in the tower room of the Government Building [Aliiolani Hale]. These are chiefly sketches of the volcanic phenomena which have been displayed on Hawaii since November last. Having been on the spot from the beginning of the eruption, and taking a great interest in it, Mr. Furneaux has been able to secure illustrations of all its phases during the progress of the flow, from its source to the immediate proximity of the sea. The first of the series is a view taken from Kawaihae, in November last, after the flow had divided into two or more streams; one the Kau stream, which, after threatening the Kapapala Plantation, has long since ceased to flow; another the flow towards the plateau between Maunaloa and Maunakea, which, after many windings and doublings, is now threatening the town and harbor of Hilo. The next view was taken from Hilo Bay, and shows the three streams which were so conspicuous on the face of the mountain in November last. Immediately after his arrival Mr. Furneaux paid a visit to the crater of eruption, which is situated at an elevation of about 12,000 feet, or about 2,000 feet below the summit of the mountain. Three of the paintings depict this crater, one being from a point which gives a view of its interior. Another picture gives a near view of the blow-hole, or secondary crater, from which a discharge of lava was noticed on December 3rd. The next group of paintings gives us vivid illustrations of the conditions of things near Hilo in April and May last. In the former month Mr. Furneaux obtained a fine view of the main flow, as it appeared in the woods about eight miles from Hilo, at the time when its whole width of two to two and a half miles was in a molten and very active state, just at a point where the Puna, Waiakea and Hilo flows were being separately developed from it. In this picture we have a fine illustration of the “volcano cloud” with its deep red tinge looking more fiery than the very lava whose glow it reflects. The next of the series shows the curious phenomena of a waterspout on the lava flow, a sight frequently witnessed when the front face of the stream was lingering in the woods. Another picture also taken in April at the same distance from Hilo, shows the black and broken surface of the flow of 1856 and this new and greater flow creeping up to and over it. The next series of sketches were of the Waiakea flow taken two months before the sudden outburst by which it has threatened the sugar mill. One is of the artist’s camp in a dense growth of ohias, tree-ferns and wild bananas close to the edge of the flow. Another sketch from the tent door pictures some bananas, ferns and creepers with the red glare from the lava as a background. A third is a daylight view of the flow showing the havoc made in the lovely forest thus cruelly invaded. This sketch was taken when one tall ohia remained still erect with lava all round it. John Hall, whose place has since been destroyed, was Mr. Furneaux’s guide, and the latter made a sketch of his house before its fate was anticipated. This view was taken in May; a companion picture shows everything overwhelmed except a tree and part of the fence, with an extraordinary pit in the foreground, revealing the liquid lava flowing beneath the cooled crust. Later in May Mr. Furneaux paid a visit to what is known as the Hilo flow. Among the group of sketches then taken is one of the advanced part of the flow, with a group of Hawaiians getting specimens in the foreground; a sketch of Hale Laumaia, with the volcanic cloud hanging over the wooded scenery of the background; a sketch of the flow at the moment of one of the gas explosions, which are common when the lava is passing over the surface of previous flows, and penetrating into the caverns which about in the dead lava. Then comes a sketch in which we have a cascade of lava falling over a ledge of bare rock, and by way of contrast to its lurid fire, the flame of burning timber and undergrowth on the right hand of the picture. Following this series is a picture of the Waiakea flow as seen from a distance before its sudden advance; also a sketch of H. H. Ruth Keelikolani’s place, where that flow will probably reach the sea. The last group are from sketches taken late in July, after the Waiakea flow had pushed forward with so much violence. One of John Hall’s property has already been alluded to; another shows the lava flowing over a precipice about 60 feet wide, and 14 or 15 feet high, into a great pool of water—a scene already familiar to us through Mr. Dickson’s photographs; and a third shows the Waiakea mill, and the position of the flow on 25th July, with the intervening land. One interesting picture shows the way in which the lava at times pushes its way forward, throwing out snake-like tongues of fire from the black front of the stream.

Besides these paintings, there are some pictures of Halemaumau, and some views of forest and mountain scenery. Mr. Furneaux has also a number of other pictures, which he has not at present opened out for the public view, as he intends to return at once to Hilo to increase his store of sketches, and to catch, if possible, the lava stream in the very act of precipitating itself into the sea.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 8/13/1881, p. 3)

PCA_8_13_1881_3.png

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXVI, Number 7, Page 3. August 13, 1881.

The royals in Kona, 1879.

News from Kona.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:—

At 11 o’clock at night on the 19th of March, landed at the shore of Kailua nei were the King; Queen Kapiolani; Her Highness, R. Keelikolani; Minister of Finance S. K. Kaai; and some others. There were many of us gathered during those days. On the 22nd, the Queen went to the uplands of Kuahewa to see the troubles of Nawai, a blind man, to give him some help for his home that burned down. Continue reading

A name song for Keelikolani, jointly composed, 1863.

NO KEELIKOLANI, MUOLAULANI KA INOA.

He anana’la i ka loa o Alakai,
Ke kuhi la he koke aku o Maunahina,
He liuliu Waialeale na ke a—nui,
He anu ka ka nahele o Aipo,
O ke kupilikii aku ia hina i Maunahina—,
Hina i ka hoona rama a ke aloha,
I ka ae hakoko a ka manao,
E pilia la i ke moe he kanaka—i—a,
He kanaka ia ua hele ia ka malama,
Hana ia iho i mio kou aloha—e—a.

Na Lilipi.

Owau e hele i ka papa o Apua,
Ke kuhi la he ale wai ko Maukele,
He pali mai hoi, Holei na ka u—a,
He ua ka ka waimaka e kulu nei,
He milimili hoi ka loko o kuu aloha—e—a,
Aloha i ka liko ohia o Puulena,
I ke-a hanu i na makani ka o lua,
Ua loa Kauonahunahu i ke a—nu,
E anu la i ka nui o ke aloha,
Ua pelepulu ua mauna i ka manao—e—a. Continue reading

The birthday of Princess Ruta Keelikolani Keanolani Kanahoahoa Muolaulani Keikiheleloa Keanohalia Kaleonahenahe Kohalikolani, 1871.

The birthday of Muolaulani.—In a report we received, we learned some things about the birthday of the Royal Governess Keelikolani. We were informed that on the past 9th, that was the day she gave delightful parties, for the day that her mother Pauahi suffered the pangs of labor and gave birth to her. A bit before her birthday, she set up a great lanai a hundred feet or more in length on the grounds of Hulihee Palace, on the right side of the building in the front of Haleolelo. This was large enough for over three hundred people. Her retainers and her people were those who filled out the party. And the taro that she farmed in those days of famine in the year of ’70 was the taro at the feast. Long live the land of the calm of the billowy clouds white like hinano blossoms.

[This reminded me of a video I recently saw on Facebook, speaking of another Haleolelo, this one on the other side of Hawaii Island, giving honor to the Princess and what she stood for. Click here for Oiwi TV’s video featuring Haleolelo.]

(Au Okoa, 2/16/1871, p. 3)

AuOkoa_2_16_1871_3.png

Ke Au Okoa, Buke VI, Helu 44, Aoao 3. Feberuari 16, 1871.

Lucy Kaheiheimalie Peabody Henriques has gone on, 1928.

MUCH ALOHA FOR THAT ALII WHO WAS FULL OF ALOHA

That chiefess born of the land, Mrs. Lucy Kaheiheimalie Peabody Henriques has gone. She was loved by all of us, and she was a precious one among the people. She was going silently away these past weeks. Aloha with unending tears. She went to see the sacred bosom of Kane. The rejected flowers were strewn at Wailua [?? Ua ahu iho la na pua wahawaha i Wailua]; she left grieving behind, her beloved lei, her daughter, Kalanikiekie Henriques. Continue reading