Kamehameha IV visits Nihoa, 1857.

The French man of war “Eurydice” arrived from Nihoa with Kamehameha IV, the King, and the Governor of Oahu [Kekuanaoa], on the 25th of April.

They were on Nihoa touring, and the trip was fine, and they returned in good health. They brought back three “Elephants of the sea,” from there.

Tomorrow, the vessel will return to Oahu.

Hanalei, Kauai, Ap. 27, 1857.

(Hae Hawaii, 5/13/1857, p. 26)

HaeHawaii_5_13_1857_26

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou.—Helu 7, Aoao 26. Mei 13, 1857.

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Queen Emma sends condolences to Mataio Kekuanaoa, 1866.

News of the Royal Court

Through the kindness of His Highness Mataio Kekuanaoa, we put before our readers these loving words of our Queen Emma.

Upper Gore Lodge, England
Kensington, July 23, 1866.

My Father; Much Aloha:

During these dark days of distress of ours and the nation, I have much aloha for you and the One who left us. Alas for my sister-in-law [kaikoeke], my companion of the land from when we were children. The sun and the rain are companions, joined together by us are the sea spray and the rains steady on the barren fields and the forests; your leader of the islands. How sad; aloha for that lei of ours, my child, and aloha for my dear husband. Alas for you all! My heart is troubled as I am separated alone in a foreign land. It is as if this trip to introduce the Archipelago to the Great Nations of the World is a waste of time. But be patient, O Father, don’t give up, and leave us. For there is one who remains from your loins. Be patient.

With a heavy heart,

Your child,

(Signed) Kaleleonalani.

[There were so many deaths amongst the alii during these years, Ka Haku o Hawaii and Kamehameha IV, and now, Victoria Kamamalu. Not long after, her hanai mother, Grace Kamaikui Young Rooke would pass on. These were indeed dark days for Queen Emma.]

(Kuokoa, 10/6/1866, p. 2)

Kuokoa_10_6_1866_2.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 40, Aoao 2. Okatoba 6, 1866.

Birthday of Kamehameha IV, 1862.

Orders of the General
[Kauoha Alihikaua]

1. This coming Sunday, the 9th of this month, is the birthday of King Kamehameha IV; therefore, it is commanded that at 8 o’clock that morning, the Hawaiian Flag will be raised at Punchbowl [Puowaina], and at the residence of the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa, the Governor, and on the other Flag Poles of the Nation. All of the Flags will be taken down at sunset that day.

Because the birthday of the King will fall on a Sunday, therefore, the celebration of the King’s birthday will be postponed until the following Monday, that being the 10th.

2. The Hawaiian Flags will again be raised, as was stated above. 21 guns will be shot off at the rising of the sun, and at 12 noon, and also at the setting of the sun.

3. All of the Military Officers and the King’s personal Guards are to wear their gold-trimmed uniforms [kapa kula] and their swords. The Officers shall be smartly uniformed until sunset.

By the order of the General.

John O. Dominis.
Adjutant General [Akukana Kenelala].

War Department [Keena Kaua],
Feb. 5, 1862.

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 2/6/1862, p. 3)

HokuoHawaii_2_6_1862_3

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke I, Helu 20, Aoao 3. Feberuari 6, 1862.

Death of Abner Kuhooheiheipahu Paki, 1855.

The death of A. Paki, on the 13th of this June.

The chief A. Paki. He appears in the genealogy of the Chiefs of this Nation, from ancient times, and he is a high Chief of this land descended from Haloa, that being the one father of the children living in this world, and the father of our people.

Part of his genealogy is taken from the High Chiefs of the land, and he is part of Kamehameha’s, and he is part of Kiwalao’s, and he is a hereditary chief of a single line from ancient times; and he was a father who rescued from trouble his people of this nation from Hawaii to Kauai.

His accomplishments during his life. When he promised to stop drinking and to become a Christian, from that time on he did not drink alcohol again until the day he died.

He was a Chief who was steadfast in his work for the nation, and he was an Alii who would be furious when he heard his deceased child being spoken ill of, as well as of his children who survive him.

From what I have seen of this Alii while he was alive. In the year 1837, he began his governmental work, and at one point he was appointed Chief Justice [L. K. Kiekie] of the country, and at another point he served as Governor, and another time he was included in the Privy Council, and still another time he was the steward for his child, this during his lifetime. Continue reading

Restoration Day celebration, day number 4! 1844.

On Saturday, Aug. 3—Gov. Kekuanaoa gave a rural feast at the village of Waikiki, to his Majesty and court. A rustic arbor, with flags over head, was prepared under the beautiful grove of Ko [Kou] trees. The table was 100 feet long, well laid out, and accommodated 81 guests. The feast was cooked altogether in the Hawaiian style, and consisted of 17 different dishes, some of which were excellent.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

On Saturday...

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1.—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.

King Kamehameha III’s funeral procession announcement, 1854.

ORDER OF PROCESSION

FOR THE FUNERAL OF

HIS LATE MAJESTY, KING KAMEHAMEHA III.

GRAND MARSHAL.

MARSHAL.

HAWAIIAN CALVARY.

PHYSICIANS.

CLERGYMEN OF ALL DENOMINATIONS.

FREE MASONS.

Odd Fellows.

ROYAL SCHOOL.

FACULTY AND STUDENTS OF OAHU COLLEGE.

OTHER SCHOOLS WITH THEIR MASTERS, ALL SIX DEEP.

ARTILLERY.

THE KING’S BAND.

HOUSEHOLD TROOPS.

THE KING’S PURVEYOR AND SERVANTS.

THE PHYSICIAN AND ASSISTING PHYSICIAN OF THE LATE KING.

TWO KAHILIS.

THE LATE KING’S STANDARD.

SOLDIERS. HIGH CHIEFS. SMALL KAHILIS. [COFFIN] SMALL KAHILIS. HIGH CHIEFS. SOLDIERS.

TWO KAHILIS.

HER MAJESTY, THE QUEEN.

HER ROYAL HIGHNESS, THE PRINCESS VICTORIA, HIS MAJESTY, THE KING, HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS, PRINCE KAMEHAMEHA.

THE KING’S CHANCELLOR, THE CHAMBERLAIN, THE KUHINA NUI.

THE MNINISTERS.

THE REPRESENTATIVES OF FOREIGN NATIONS.

The Governors of Islands.

THE MEMBERS OF THE PRIVY COUNCIL AND LADIES OF THE COURT.

THE FOREIGN CONSULS, AND THE POST CAPTAINS, COMMANDERS AND OFFICERS OF SHIPS OF WAR.

The Judges, Officers of Customs and other Government Officers,—Four deep.

Drummers.

HAWAIIAN INFANTRY.

FIRST HAWAIIAN GUARD.

FOREIGN MARINES, TAKING PLACE ACCORDING TO THE RANK AND SENIORITY OF THEIR RESPECTIVE COMMANDERS.

Fire Companies, four deep.

Hook and Ladder Company, four deep.

The King’s Yeomanry,—Four deep.

THE FOREIGN RESIDENTS AND FOREIGNERS BELONGING TO FOREIGN MERCHANT VESSELS,—SIX DEEP.

The native Population generally,—eight deep.

SOLDIERS,—FOUR DEEP.

————

Those who attend the Funeral to assemble at the Palace at 10, A. M., on Saturday, the 6th of January, and the Procession to start at 11.

The LIne of Procession will be formed on the north side of King Street, fronting the Palace, the right resting on Richard St. Those who proceed with the remains of his late Majesty, will take their position North of the Palace, towards Richards Street. The public, generally, are invited to attend.

M. KEKUANAOA, Grand Marshal.

PALACE, DECEMBER 20, 1854.

(Polynesian, 12/30/1854, p. 1)

ORDER OF PROCESSION

The Polynesian, Volume XI, Number 34, Page 1. December 30, 1854.

Mataio Kekuanaoa, William French, the Chinese, and sugar, 1838.

PERTAINING TO THE SUGAR MILL.

Mataio Kekuanaoa rethatched the sugar mill building at Peleula, and it is complete. So too of the storehouse and the living quarters of the Chinese. This is how sugarcane is dealt with at this facility.

Mataio deals with the buildings, raw cane, firewood, and the horses used to pull loads; Mr. French [Mr. Farani] deals with the Chinese who clean the cane and process the cane and fill the bags; and then it is divided by weight, two thirds for Kekuanaoa and one third for Mr. French. Also, there are some of Kekuanaoa’s Hawaiian men who work with the Chinese, and as for the bags [? ekeeke laulau] for the sugar, that is to be provided by the person to whom the sugar belongs.

Listen, all you farmers, chiefs, and makaainana of Honolulu nei! Should you possess raw cane, bring it to be milled, and you will receive half of the sugar [ko maloo] produced from the raw cane that you bring. Two…

(Kumu Hawaii, 12/19/1838, p. 59)

NO KA WILI KO

Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 4, Pepa 15, Aoao 59. Dekemaba 19, 1938.

…sixths of the sugar will go to Mr. French [Mi. Farani] for the labor, and one sixth will go to Kekuanaoa for the building and facilities, and three sixths will go to you to whom belonged the raw cane.

It is good to plant sugarcane in Honolulu now, because it is clear who has the mill and will work it. Do plant, people with land and people with oo, so that no more will you be without the basics of life, and your meager way of life will be over.

(Kumu Hawaii, 12/19/1838, p. 60)

...hapaono o ke ko...

Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 4, Pepa 15, Aoao 60. Dekemaba 19, 1938.