In less than 10 years Old Oakum is just a character with half a name, 1906.

Old Oakum, a Character in Honolulu Long Ago

“Old Oakum” was one of the odd characters of Honolulu u to about thirty years ago. He was a harmless creature whose one talent was that of collecting honey from bee trees without being stung. Where he came from or was born, or just what his nationality was, were matters not well known, for “Old Oakum” seemed to have forgotten all about himself long before coming to Honolulu which must have been in the early 50s. Continue reading

Death of Dwight Holcomb, 1877.

Death of “Oakum.”—The half crazy vagrant who has for years been well-known in and about Honolulu by the name of Oakum, died at the Insane Asylum on Monday morning last, where he has been for some months, suffering from aneurism. His real name was Dwight Holcomb, he was about 50 years of age, Continue reading

Mary Dominis arrives on this day in 1837…, 1887.

[Found under: “Kela me Keia”]

On this day, the 23rd, Mrs. Mary Dominis, mother of the Honorable John O. Dominis, has resided in Hawaii nei for 50 years. She arrived here in Hawaii on the 23 aboard the ship Jones which was navigated by her husband Captain J. O. Dominis, and she has not left these lands until this day.

(Kuokoa, 4/23/1887, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 17, Aoao 3. Aperila 23, 1887.

Rich treated differently? 1881.

WHAT IS WITH THIS?

This past Sunday, the steamer “City of Sydney” arrive in this port, and aboard was the millionaire Spreckels [Ona Miliona] from San Francisco. He came to visit his property here in Hawaii nei. But this Tuesday, he boarded the Likelike and sailed for Kulaokamaomao without being quarantined as per our quarantine law. What is with this? Is this action by the Minister of the Interior [Kuhina Kalaiaina, H. A. P. Carter] to let him go unequally? Continue reading

La Hoihoi Ea celebrated in North Kohala, 1865.

Restoration day in North Kohala, Hawaii.—We were informed by S. Kahookano of Kohala, Hawaii, about the commemoration on the 21st [31st] of July past and the putting on of a banquet there. Just as the aloha in the patriotic hearts of Hawaiian youths rummaging about here, so too did they exerted themselves Continue reading

Dissatisfaction with the new king, 1887.

The Native Hawaiian
HEARD FROM.

The Natives of Kaneohe Show Their Feeling Towards the Present Government.

Ua paneia e W. M. Kipikona na mea i hoikeike ia iho nei, e pili ana i ke aupuni e ku nei, o ka poe ma ke poo ke hilinai nei lakou ma o na haole la o ka aina, o na kamaaina hoi, aole o lakou hilinai iki i ka Moi a me kona mau Kuhina, i ko lakou hooponopono ana i ke aupuni. Ua ike ia ka hemahema o ko Kipikona mau alakai ana i ka manao o ka lehulehu, a e ike ia ka manao o na kamaaina o ka aina e like me na mea i kakauia malalo iho. (Ua kakauia keia ma ka olelo Hawaii e like me ka mea i ike maka ia a i lohe ia mai ka poe nona na inoa malalo iho o keia, a i kakau inoa ia e lakou me ka maopopo pono.)

Ua makemake makou i aupuni maemae, i aupuni e hooponopono noeau ia ana, a e malama ia ana na loaa a pau no kou homealoha, kou aina makuahine—”ua pau loa na alii oiaio ia Lunalilo i hala e aku nei.” O D. Kalakaua aole oia he Alii io; aole makou i noi i na Lunamakaainana e koho iaia; aole no hoi o makou makemake iaia, e like me na kahoaka i ike ia i kona la i koho ia ai. Continue reading

This letter to the editor of the Nuhou is interesting in so many ways. 1873.

NOT GOOD.

When I saw the newspaper Nuhou Hawaii; I was greatly gladdened to see it. When I took a close look, I was very happy. I talked with my wife, “Hey, this paper, Nuhou Hawaii, it is very good for us to subscribe to this paper.” Please don’t be upset at my bad writing. Gibson, I have much appreciation for you; at your great strength in saying that they should not give Puuloa [Pearl Harbor]. I talk in Chinese; all of Honolulu is appreciative of you. Continue reading

Mary Jane Fayerweather Montano’s story continued, 1923.

DRAMA OF OLD HAWAII MADE PICTURESQUE

(Continued from Page 1)

Booth’s dancing hall. The schoolhouse had a cross on the front. From 9 to 12, noon, we had book studies, and from 1 to 4 p. m. we did fancy work in which or teacher was an expert. I was very fond of fancy work and finished my first piece to hang in my guardian’s hall. The picture was of a lamb lying down, holding a flag, with clouds below and sun rays around its head. The picture was large. Continue reading