[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O NA KAMEHAMEHA. Na S. M. Kamakau.”]

The year 1828 was famous for Kaahumanu going to Hawaii and retrieving Lilinoe on Mauna Kea, who was an ancient woman; a thousand and more years she was left on the mountain of Mauna Kea, according to her sworn statement. It was said that Lilinoe remained with body unspoiled, her hair remained affixed and had not fallen out. And should you want to see her descendants, they can be found by way of Huanuiikalailai; she became a kupuna of the alii, and came forth was Umiokalani, the son of Keawenuiaumi and Hoopiliahoe. But it was stated that Lilinoe was not found by Kaahumanu and that she was hidden away. Liloa, Lonoikamakahiki, Kauhoa, and Lole are the only ones who were found by Kaahumanu at Waipio, and they were brought to Kaawaloa. The alii in Hale o Keawe were from the ancestral chiefs to Kalaniopuu and Kiwalao. Hale o Keawe was filled with the bones of the alii, they were arranged and secured in kaai. They were taken to Kaawaloa and a majority of them were burned in fire. That is a very wicked example in Boti’s mind.

Here is another, Kaikioewa was indebt to Mikapalani [William French], that being the haole trader; the other alii were greatly indebted to him, but in his transactions he was a haole who was beyond reproach. The sandalwood that was thrown away by some haole traders were purchased by Mr. French, and therefore he was also called by the name Hapuku because of he indiscriminately gathered [hapuku] the white sandalwood as well as the very small branches, and he was relied upon by the alii and greatly liked; therefore, the alii were much indebted to him. Kaikioewa was one who was indebted, and because he had no sandalwood to pay his debt, therefore Kaikioewa paid his debt with the land of Kawalo [Kewalo] and Kulaokahua which went to Mr. French. So Mr. French prepared to build wooden structures at Kulaokahua adjacent to Waikiki where the Olohe sank.

(Kuokoa, 6/13/1868, p. 1)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 24, Aoao 1. Iune 13, 1868.

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News of the Districts.

From the friend of the many, M. Mose Manu of Kipahulu, Maui, we received the news of his area. There is not much news, but he was filled with solemnity in his sadness at hearing of the death of Mr. Henry A. Pierce. So too with a majority of our readers, for Mr. Pierce was a familiar haole in Hawaii from the olden days, but he was known by the name Mika Pia. He was a haole trader here in Honolulu when the trade industry was first being established in the old times. Hanuela [James Hunnewell] folks, and Mika Palani [William French] folks are his fellow familiar haole of those days. Kauikeaouli was the King then. After those days, Mika Pia returned back within [?] and the Minister resident from America came. He lived at Puunui. Mr. Paulo Hueu, a familiar one amongst us, lived with him for many years. The old haole from those years of the Hawaiian nation are almost all gone. Just as with the passing of the old time alii and the makaainana of the land, so too with the malihini who came and resided here those days; they are disappearing.

On the 29th of this past month, Kekahu and Kaoiki of Waimea, Oahu, held a banquet. It was a birthday party for their child. It began at seven o’clock in the evening. The large and dignified table was supplied with fish of the sea and livestock of the fields that were baked in the imu until perfect for satisfying the bodies of man. This pen prays that the child for whom the banquet was held will go on and live to very old age.

From the mouth of a friend who traveled to the island of Kauai and returned, we learned of the great drunkenness at Wailua Kai. The worst is on Saturday nights: that is when they fight like wild animals. In the last days of the legislative session of 1884, we heard that the Hon. Palohau left for good all sorts of intoxicants. If this is true, then this Wailua would be the proper place for Palohau to go and reform the alcohol drinking friends of that place, before they are all die.

News from all over the land comes to us frequently pertaining to people turning to the superstitions of the old days, the deeds of pagan times. It is not fitting for people who have become enlightened to return to the dark. Idolatry was left because it is dark, and it is something done by the ignorant. If the lahui is enlightened, they cannot look to the akua makani [spirit gods]; that would be deceitful.

(Kuokoa, 9/12/1885, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXIV, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 12, 1885.

In less than 10 years Old Oakum is just a character with half a name, 1906.

Old Oakum, a Character in Honolulu Long Ago

“Old Oakum” was one of the odd characters of Honolulu u to about thirty years ago. He was a harmless creature whose one talent was that of collecting honey from bee trees without being stung. Where he came from or was born, or just what his nationality was, were matters not well known, for “Old Oakum” seemed to have forgotten all about himself long before coming to Honolulu which must have been in the early 50s. Continue reading

Death of Dwight Holcomb, 1877.

Death of “Oakum.”—The half crazy vagrant who has for years been well-known in and about Honolulu by the name of Oakum, died at the Insane Asylum on Monday morning last, where he has been for some months, suffering from aneurism. His real name was Dwight Holcomb, he was about 50 years of age, Continue reading

Mary Dominis arrives on this day in 1837…, 1887.

[Found under: “Kela me Keia”]

On this day, the 23rd, Mrs. Mary Dominis, mother of the Honorable John O. Dominis, has resided in Hawaii nei for 50 years. She arrived here in Hawaii on the 23 aboard the ship Jones which was navigated by her husband Captain J. O. Dominis, and she has not left these lands until this day.

(Kuokoa, 4/23/1887, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 17, Aoao 3. Aperila 23, 1887.

Rich treated differently? 1881.

WHAT IS WITH THIS?

This past Sunday, the steamer “City of Sydney” arrive in this port, and aboard was the millionaire Spreckels [Ona Miliona] from San Francisco. He came to visit his property here in Hawaii nei. But this Tuesday, he boarded the Likelike and sailed for Kulaokamaomao without being quarantined as per our quarantine law. What is with this? Is this action by the Minister of the Interior [Kuhina Kalaiaina, H. A. P. Carter] to let him go unequally? Continue reading

La Hoihoi Ea celebrated in North Kohala, 1865.

Restoration day in North Kohala, Hawaii.—We were informed by S. Kahookano of Kohala, Hawaii, about the commemoration on the 21st [31st] of July past and the putting on of a banquet there. Just as the aloha in the patriotic hearts of Hawaiian youths rummaging about here, so too did they exerted themselves Continue reading

Dissatisfaction with the new king, 1887.

The Native Hawaiian
HEARD FROM.

The Natives of Kaneohe Show Their Feeling Towards the Present Government.

Ua paneia e W. M. Kipikona na mea i hoikeike ia iho nei, e pili ana i ke aupuni e ku nei, o ka poe ma ke poo ke hilinai nei lakou ma o na haole la o ka aina, o na kamaaina hoi, aole o lakou hilinai iki i ka Moi a me kona mau Kuhina, i ko lakou hooponopono ana i ke aupuni. Ua ike ia ka hemahema o ko Kipikona mau alakai ana i ka manao o ka lehulehu, a e ike ia ka manao o na kamaaina o ka aina e like me na mea i kakauia malalo iho. (Ua kakauia keia ma ka olelo Hawaii e like me ka mea i ike maka ia a i lohe ia mai ka poe nona na inoa malalo iho o keia, a i kakau inoa ia e lakou me ka maopopo pono.)

Ua makemake makou i aupuni maemae, i aupuni e hooponopono noeau ia ana, a e malama ia ana na loaa a pau no kou homealoha, kou aina makuahine—”ua pau loa na alii oiaio ia Lunalilo i hala e aku nei.” O D. Kalakaua aole oia he Alii io; aole makou i noi i na Lunamakaainana e koho iaia; aole no hoi o makou makemake iaia, e like me na kahoaka i ike ia i kona la i koho ia ai. Continue reading