“Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii” published, 1961.

S. M. Kamakau, whose writings provided much of the material used by author Alexander in his “Brief History” which appears weekly on these pages, will be honored on Monday as a collection of his manuscripts is published by the Kamehameha Schools Press under the title of “Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii.”The 440-page book, regarded as an invaluable addition to works on Isle history, goes on sale tomorrow at the Bishop Museum and at leading Honolulu book stores.

[This famous Hawaiian was born in Ewa, at Mokuleia, Waialua, on Oahu, on the 29th of October, 1815. Continue reading

Did you get to see, “Day of Conquest: A Story of Kaululāʻau,” put on by Lānaʻi Academy of Performing Arts?

THE STORY
OF
ELEIO.

PART 1.

IT IS PERHAPS WELL THAT WE TALK here about Eleio, the caretaker of Kakaalaneo, one of the Alii of Maui, and thereafter, talk about Kaululaau, the actual son of Kakaalaneo and Kelekeleiokaula, an female alii of Hawaii, the daughter of Kaleihaohia, an alii of Hawaii. Continue reading

What they were reading 100 years ago.

A STORY
OF

MERAPI

THE ONE THAT WAS CALLED THE MOON OF ISRAEL

AND

THE PERSECUTION OF THE HEBREWS IN EGYPT

In times long ago, that being the period when the people of Israel were being persecuted in the land of Egypt, there appeared from the tribe of Levi, a beautiful girl of no compare, whose back was straight as a cliff and face as clear as the moon, according to the old saying, who was called Merapi, the daughter of Nathan of the tribe of Levi, and because of her feminine beauty,  and because she had a fair complexion, she was called by her people, “The Moon of Israel.” Continue reading

What they were reading 100 years ago.

THE TALE
OF
Kepakailiula
THE FIERCE ONE AND
FEARLESS WARRIOR
OF
HILO HANAKAHI A THE
FAMOUS ISLAND OF
MOKUOLA, JUTTING OUT IN THE SEA

(An Old Story of Hawaii Nui Kuauli)

(INTRODUCTION)

The writer of the moolelo needs to explain first about some things people say about this famous Moolelo of the old days of Hawaii nei so that all sorts of thoughts will not well up in our readers of this moolelo. According to the beliefs of some who memorized this Moolelo of Kepakailiula, he was born in Kaakea, Waipio, and below that famed valley of “Beautiful Waipio where the cliffs face each other,” is where he was raised as a favorite. Continue reading

Disclaimer and the power of the missionaries and the church, 1869.

A disclaimer:

Mamuli o ke kono ana mai a ka lehulehu e hoopuka i Kaao a moolelo Hawaii a haole ma ko kakou nupepa, a no ka mea hoi, no ka lehulehu ka nupepa, nolaila, ua ae aku makou e hoopukaia ke Kaao Hawaii malalo iho nei. Aka, ke noi nei makou, o na olelo maalea a me na olelo hoomanamana o ka wa kahiko, aole no ia he mea na kakou e manaoio aku ai; he hoike ana ia i ke ano hupo loa o ko kakou lahui i kela wa. O na hewa a me na olelo pelapela, e kapae loa aku ka haku Kaao ia mea mai kona kakau ana mai. Continue reading

More from “The Origins of the Archipelago of Hawaii nei and its Peopling as Seen in the Old Mele,” collected by John H. Wise, 1912.

[He MOOLELO NO KA Hookumuia Ana o na Paemoku o Hawaii Nei AME KA HOOLAUKANAKA ANA I HOIKEIA MA NA MELE HAWAII KAHIKO: Houluuluia e John H. Wise.]

Pauku 8.

O hanau ka Moana o Wakea,
O ka Nalu na Wakea, o ke Kai na Wakea,
O kai kane, o kai wahine na Wakea,
O ko’a ku, o ko’a hale loulu na Wakea, Continue reading