Conclusion of Kamakau’s “Ancient matters…” 1845.

…standing. Then the Hawaiians said, “The haole said that there at Molea at Hamakua is kapu for marking fishes.” Then the Hawaiians shouted, it was as if the haole knew where the fishes were marked!

By S. M. Kamakau.

[Where would we be without Kamakau? Hauoli la hanau ia oe, e Manaiakalani!]

(Elele, 2/10/1846, pp. 180)

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Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 1, Pepa 23, Aoao 180. Feberuari 10,  1846.

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Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau, ke kakau moolelo, in his early days, 1845.

SOME ANCIENT MATTERS OF HAWAII NEI.

Lahainaluna, Dec. 10, 1845

When the islands of Hawaii were created by Kumuhonua and his wife Haloiho; when Kumuhonua slept and rose from his sleep, the earth turned and the shaking was called an earthquake [olai].

At that time, the duties were not divided, and names were not given to the many things.

Therefore all things were clarified, animals, birds, crawling things, things with wings that flew in the sky, and men.

Each thing was given its duty, and the duties were clearly divided, appropriate for each living being and the things without the breath of life; this distribution of duties was done at Umauma in Hilo Paliku.

After lands were handed out, along came Halo, who stood beside the river and asked for land for himself. “I want land for myself,” he said to the one giving out land; “You have come when all the land was given out, and there is only one land left.” “Where?” “The polapilau.” “That is my land,” and that land became the land of Halo; completed was the giving of land to those with the breath of life and without the breath of life.

At Molea in Hamakua, that is the place where all the fish of the ocean gathered, the large fish and tiny fish; it was there that all the fish were marked; the stripped ones, the red ones, the white one, the yellow ones, all the different ones in the sea; Kapuhili was the head of those who did the marking; upon all of the unmarked fish, ash was strewn and they became spotted.

All the fishes of the ocean were given its name.

Kumuhonua was the first man, and Haloiho was the first woman. The gods were Ku and Lono.

When Lono (Captain Cook) landed in Hawaii nei. The men went aboard the ship and spoke Hawaiian to the haole; the haole however did not listen to what was spoken; therefore the haole spoke in their language, refusing, without listening. “No more;” so the Hawaiians clarified, “Molea is kapu,” “no more,” “Molea at Hamakua is kapu,” and the haole nodded without under-…

(Elele, 2/10/1846, p. 179)

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Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 1, Pepa 23, Aoao 179. Feberuari 10,  1846.

Patriotism, 1893.

THE PEOPLE OF HAWAII HAVE ALOHA FOR THEIR ALII.

From ancient times, from all the way into the realm of po, from early on, from the very beginning, born was the aloha of Hawaiian Men, Hawaiian Women, and the Offspring of their loins, for their Alii, all the way until this very day; it would seem that it is greater than anything else pertaining to their sovereign, and it would seem there is no greater proof than the words pronounced by our King Kauliluaikeanuwaialeale [Kalakaua], when he went on that famous trip around the world in the year 1881, and upon his treading once more upon his birth sands; this is what he stated:

KE KAENA A KA MOI KALAKAUA.

Ua kaahele au maluna o ka ilihonua me ka moana,
A Inia mamao, a me Kina kaulana,
Hoea i na aekai o Aferika, a na palena o Europa,
A halawai me ka ikaika o na aina a pau,
A ia’u i ku ai ma ka aoao o na Poo Aupuni,
Ka poe mana maluna o ka lakou ma ka hiehie Alii,
Hoomaopopo iho la i ka uku-iki, a nawaliwali o Ko’u,
Me Ko’u Nohoalii i hookahuaia maluna o kahi puu Pele,
A ma kahi o na miliona i hooko i ka keia mau Moi,
He mau tausani wale iho no malalo o Ko’u malu,
Aka, ka upu nei loko, Na’u ke Kaena hiki,
Aia he mau nani maloko o na poai o Ko’u mau aekai—
I oi aku ka makamae i ka O’u mau hoa Moi,
Aohe O’u kumu hopo maloko o Ko’u Aupuni,
He hiki ke hui me Ko’u lahui me ka weli ole,
Aohe maka’u No’u iho, me ke kiai pili-paa ole ia,
A Na’u ke Kaena, he momi i hoounaia mailuna mai Na’u—
Eia ia’u ke aloha oiaio o Ko’u Lahui.

[The first time I heard these powerful words was from a Palani Vaughan record (and looking back, I think he is one of the many reasons why this blog exists today). I heard it and thought man, that is definitely not a boast that could seriously be claimed by any other of his fellow leaders of his time (so much less by those of today). And when I first saw Kalakaua’s words restated in this article after the overthrow, it made the statement even more profound. This, by the way, was so important that they reprinted it again on 1/21/1893!

For the English version from an article right after Kalakaua’s return, click here! Learn the stories!! Pass them forward!!!]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/18/1893, p. 3)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 141, Aoao 3. Ianuari 18, 1893.

Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto through the years, 2006.

WHAT LIES BENEATH: UNCOVERING ANCIENT TREASURES OF POLYNESIA

Photos courtesy of Yosihiko Sinoto

1955

A young Yosihiko Sinoto works at Makalai Cave, an archaeological site at South Point on the Big Island.

1961

Sinoto, right, and longtime colleague Kenneth Emory, at a dig on Maupiti in French Polynesia.

1982

On Huahine, Sinoto excavated planks, a paddle and, seen here, a mast from an ancient canoe.

(Advertiser, 4/9/2006, p. D1)

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Honolulu Advertiser. April 9, 2006, p. D1.

Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto and the great canoe, conclusion, 1978.

EXPEDITION CREW—Tim Lui-Kwan holds an unfinished canoe bailer found preserved on Huahine Island in Tahiti. Other early Polynesian artifacts on the table include Tahitian war clubs, called patus, and a tapa beater. From left are Elaine Rogers-Jourdane, Toni Han and archaeologist Yosihiko Sinoto.—Star-Bulletin Photo by Warren R. Roll.

PRESERVED LOG—A mastlike post is recovered from the Huahine pond.—Bishop Museum photo.

CANOE RELIC—Yosihiko Sinoto is shown digging a trench to look for the end of a plank believed to be part of an ancient double-hulled canoe.—Bishop Museum Photo.

Pieces of Ancient Canoe Found

Continued from Page One

…canoe plank, because of the L-shape, so what is it? That was the big question.

“SURPRISINGLY, we found a second piece about one foot below. The two pieces are the same size and the same shape.”

He said the logs that they found were round and well-worked and one was a boom to lash a canoe hull and an outrigger. “The form was very close to the Tahitian sailing canoe,” he noted.

After he returned to the museum, he began searching material on canoes in Oceania and studying canoe models to try and identify the large planks. Continue reading

Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto finds parts of great canoe, 1978.

Most Important Link to East Polynesian History

Parts of Ancient Canoe Found on Society Isle

By Helen Altonn
Star-Bulletin Writer

A Hawaii archaeologist has discovered what he believes are the remnants of an ancient double-hulled canoe such as described in Polynesian legends.

They are two large L-shaped boards, apparently the end splash boards of a double canoe.

“If it is a double canoe, the size is bigger than the Hokule’a,” said Yosihiko Sinoto, chairman of the Bishop Museum anthropology department.

He uncovered the boards and numerous other wooden objects, many associated with canoeing, in a pond on Huahine in the Society Islands.

Kenneth Emory, senior archaeologist as the museum, said the site is the most important found yet in revealing the early history of East Polynesia. “You have a cross-section of life at one moment of time before Hawaii and New Zealand were settled,” he said. Continue reading