On the first horses in Hawaii nei, 1852.

Who Brought the First Horses to the Islands?—In a valuable document presented by Stephen Reynolds, Esq., to the R. H. A. Society at its first meeting in 1850, the following passage occurs:—Horses.—I have not been able to find the name of him who introduced the first. It appears two were brought and presented to Kamehameha; the natives say Mr. Manine was in the vessel. Several were brought before 1823. From 1824 to 1838 many cargoes were brought from California. The horses born and reared on the islands are superior in all respects to those imported from California,—better limbs, better spirits, and tougher animals.” Continue reading

On William Shakespeare, 1867.

[Found under: “NUHOU KULOKO: Honolulu.”]

Praise for Uilama Hoonaueueihe.—We saw in the English Government paper praise of the translation of the stories from English to Hawaiian of the man whose name is above. It is our desire to have our readers enjoy fine and proper moolelo. Continue reading

O ku, o ka, o ku, o ka… 1908.

[Found under: “Ka Moolelo Kaao o Hiiaka-i-ka-Poli-o-Pele”]

Then Hiiaka replied, “If you really want to go with the two of us, you can take your young pig. There is but a short distance before you reach the crater. The crater is right there upland. You will find us in no time.”

“It is a tribute, like an uku, a fish from Kahoolawe,” replied Wahineomao, continuing on, “But there is one problem. Maybe when I get back, I will not find the two of you.”

“No. You will find us,” answered Hiiaka. “And when you are making the climb, say o ku o ka, o ku o ka, and keep doing that until you reach the crater. Continue reading

Clarence W. Kinney reports on the visit of the Maori entourage, 1920.

MAORI WHO CAME TO HAWAII.

On the morning of the 16th of May, fourteen Maori arrived, six men and eight women, aboard the ship the Niagara, from New Zealand. After the examination by customs, they were taken to the mission house of the Church of the Latter-Day Saints at Auwaiolimu.

When they entered the church, the eyes were fixed of everyone who gathered, and the crowd was filled with happiness and aloha. Continue reading

Where is the royal standard? 1918.

DOES ANYONE KNOW OF THE ROYAL STANDARD?

This office was asked by the director of the museum at Kamehameha Schools [Bishop Museum] if there is someone who remembers where the royal standard of Hawaii nei was put that was taken from the palace flagpole when the throne was snatched from Queen Liliuokalani, and being that no one in this office [of the Kuokoa newspaper] remembers about that flag, we therefore are putting this question before the public; perhaps there is a Hawaiian who knows of that flag, or has heard where it was placed. Continue reading

Reminiscences of Haena,

THE STORIED PLACES OF HAENA

Some years ago, you would go by horse to see the wet caves at Haena. Now, the tourists can go easily and get to these wet caves; you travel on the pali to get to Haena.

Now cars can go and look into one of the waters called by the name Waiakanaloa.

One of these wet caves is above another wet cave; you climb up and get to where you can look down and ?????? the frigid waters like ice.

However before you reach this wet cave mentioned before, you will see a dry cave, and that is Maniniholo.

In previous times of Haena, Kakuai, some sightseers ???? into these wet caves, they boarded canoes and entered and jumped into the cold waters. Some people say that the body of the bathers turn white like snow, and the water is very cold when it touches the skin.

It is not known where the water comes from, but there is water there, it is as if these famous wet caves come up from the earth.

Maniniholo is not a wet cave; you can go in it but it is not like before when people just stood at one place, because dirt has been spread, so some places are stable, and it is filled over with sand from the beach. There are a lot of different things that are being told by those writing about storied places of these areas and the stories of the very old past. You leave these caves and you get to the cliffs where firebrands were thrown in the early days of this land. Leave there and then you see the heiau where Lohiau stayed, and now, in that place is the beautiful home of the Brown brothers [hoahanau Balaunu], the children of Mrs. Irene Kahalelaukoa [Ii] Brown before, but recently Mrs. C. S. Holloway.

That is where you see the stone foundation where Lohiau lived, and there he danced hula [???? hula ???? hele] with Hiiakaikapoliopele after Hiiaka sought to save Lohiau, and after he was revived, they left on their travels to Hawaii Island.

There are many fine things in this area of Haena along with their stories which are being greatly sought after by those writing the history of Hawaii.

[This article continues on, but it gets harder and harder to read. Hopefully the original is clearer so one day we can see what the article actually says!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/6/1931, p. 2)

HokuoHawaii_1_6_1931_2

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXIV, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Ianuari 6, 1931.

Mary Kawena Pukui, 1957.

Star-Bulletin Photo

Mrs. Mary K. Pukui

‘Words Are My Business,’ Says Kamaaina Author

By JEANETTE LAM

A new and important milestone in the long and fruitful career of Mrs. Mary Kawena Pukui is the long-awaited Hawaiian-English dictionary written by her and Dr. Samuel H. Elbert, University of Hawaii linguist. The dictionary has recently been released by the University of Hawaii Press. Continue reading