The Young Hawaiians’ Institute, Hui Hoonaauao Hawaii Opio, 1896.

The Agenda of the Young Hawaiians’ Institute for 1896.

Through the kindness of the Hui Hoonaauao Hawaii Opio of this town, the Editor of this paper has acquired the Agenda of that Institute for this year forth, it being topics being read monthly (except for September) by those who were given the subject. It begins this like this:

February—Old Hawaiian History.
Solomon Meheula.

March—The Origin of the Hawaiian Archipelago.
J. M. Poepoe.

April—The Profession of Kahuna.
J. K. Kaulia.

May—The Crusades.
J. N. K. Keola.

June—The Profession of Farmer.
S. M. Kanakanui.

July—The Profession of Fisherman.
M. K. Nakuina.

October—The Origins of the Hawaiians.
J. M. Poepoe.

November—The State of the Native Hawaiians of Today.
Charles Wilcox.

December—The Old Religion of the Hawaiians.
S. M. Kanakanui.

Following the reading of the topics, the members of the Institute will consider the true value within the topics. The Committee that organized this Agenda is, S. M. Kanakanui, Chairman [Lunahoomalu]; J. K. Kaulia, J. N. K. Keola, M. K. Nakuina, Charles Wilcox.

(Kuokoa, 1/10/1896, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXV, Helu 2, Aoao 3. Ianuari 10, 1896.
Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXV, Helu 2, Aoao 3. Ianuari 10, 1896.
Advertisements

Timoteo Haalilio in the words of William Richards, 1845.

Haalilio was born in 1808, at Koolau, Oahu. His parents were of respectable rank, and much esteemed. His father died while he was quite young, and his widowed mother subsequently married the Governor of Molokai, an island dependent on the Governor of Maui. After his death, she retained the authority of the island, and acted as Governess for the period of some fifteen years. Continue reading

On Kalaipahoa, 1931.

POISON GOD BURNED

Hilo, Hawaii, July 6, 1931.

Editor, The Star-Bulletin.

Sir: In your issue of July 4, 1931, there appears a picture of an old Hawaiian wooden idol  under which it was stated that it was believed to be the poison-god Kalaipahoa. Continue reading

“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

Plagiarism? 1868.

The History of S. M. Kamakau.

Aloha no.—These past Saturdays I saw within Whitney’s newspaper [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] them calling the haole government paper [Hawaiian Gazette], a thief, because of the translation of the History of S. M. Kamakau, into the English language, and for inserting it within some past issues of that newspaper. In my opinion, those pebbles pelted in contempt are not right at all. Continue reading