History depends on the teller, 1879.

[Found under: “CAPTAIN JAMES COOK: The Discoverer of Australia, New Zealand, Alaska and the Sandwich Islands.”]

KILLED BY SAVAGES.

It was on the coast of the latter [Hawaii] that one of his boats was stolen on the night of February 13, 1779, and on the following morning, going ashore with a lieutenant and nine men, with the intention of seizing the native chief as a hostage for its return, he became involved in a quarrel and was killed with four of his men. Continue reading

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S. M. Kamakau on Capt. James Cook, 1867.

[Found under: “Ia Ioane Kaimiola.”]

If we consider the history of Captain Cook from the start to the end, I do not come out with a flawless name or a good name for him. If there is built a Memorial to Kalanimanookahoowaha for his killing of the destructive scamp Captain Cook, that would be something most appropriate.

[This is from a  lengthy detailed response to a critique by Ioane Kaimiola (“S. M. Kamakau.” in Au Okoa, 3/18/1867, p. 1) of Kamakau’s portrayal of Cook.]

(Kuokoa, 4/6/1867, p. 4)

Kuokoa_4_6_1867_4

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 14, Aoao 4. Aperila 6, 1867.

Kalokuokamaile on the names, Kilauea and Halemaumau, 1923.

UNKNOWN ARE THE MEANINGS OF THE NAMES “KILAUEA” AND “HALEMA’UMA’U” AND WHO NAMED THEM.

O Mr Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha a nui:—Please be kind once more, and if there is a space, let me have it. Because I keep getting asked, that being the heading above. I show the answer and the explanation I got from some very old people. Continue reading