The death of Jonah Piikoi and his autobiography, 1859.

The death of J. Piikoi.

On the 26th of April, the Honorable J. Piikoi, one of the alii of this Hawaiian archipelago died. He was a much admired man for his competence and his determination in the duties given to him. He was 55 years old, and the sickness he died of was of quick pulse [? aalele nui], and problems with his blood flow, and he died.

Before the death of Piikoi, he prepared a story of his life, from his birth until the day he wrote it, that being the 7th of April. This is it below:

The Autobiography of J. Piikoi

I was born in the month of Ikuwa, that being January, in the year of the Lord 1804.

I was born in Waimea, Kauai, and that was where I was raised until the first Liholiho landed on Kauai on the 22nd of the month of  July, 1821. Continue reading

Kalaipahoa, and “Hawaiian Art,” 1941.

HAWAII’S WOODEN GODS GOOD POLYNESIAN ART

Huc M. Luquiens Appreciates Carved and Feathered Deities of Ferocious Mien and Lost Symbolism

By LORIN TARR GILL

“If we were forced to choose a single specimen to represent the characteristic art of Polynesia, it might well be one of the extraordinary wooden gods of Hawaii,” Huc Luquiens, assistant professor of art at the University of Hawaii, asserts in his paper on “Hawaiian Art,” soon to be published by the Bishop museum. Continue reading

This must have been an awesome image, 1875.

SUPERB GIFT

FROM THE

Kuokoa Newspaper for 1876!

This coming year, 1876, the Kuokoa Newspaper, and Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation, will gift to its people who prepay their two dollars, a superb and proud gift, that being Pictures of the seven Monarchs of Hawaii nei, from Kamehameha I, the “Napoleon of the Pacific;” Liholiho I., Kamehameha II.; Kamehameha III.; Kamehameha IV., Liholiho II.; Kamehameha V.; Lunalilo I.; and Kalakaua I. Their Pictures will be all printed on thick paper so that it can be taken care of greatly. Continue reading

Patriots celebrate La Hoihoi Ea in lands afar! 1862.

[For the Kuokoa.]

Hoihoi Ea Banquet

FOR THE HAWAIIAN NATION, ON THE 31st OF JULY, 1862.

The 31st of July is a day celebrated by the Hawaiian Nation because it is the day on which the sovereignty of the land was restored, from the year 1843 until this year in which it is remembered. Therefore, we, the natives of Hawaii who live in this strange land, because of our aloha for our land of birth, make this a day of remembrance and a day of prayer, setting aside our labors.

This is what was done on that day: Before that day, food was purchased, and in the morning of that day, the food was cooked first, and all the food was assembled on a table that was covered with the green foliage of the Puluki;¹ and when the conch was sounded, the fellow diners came and sat upon their own seats. Then L. H. Kapuaa stood and spoke of the nature of activities of the day; before the singing. This is one of the songs composed by the youths of the Snow Flurry [na keiki o ka Ehu Hau]. This is it below.

  1. Aloha i ka aina,
    I ke one hanau,
    O ke ao lewa he inoa,
    O ka Haku ka Moi,
    Na keiki kamaaina,
    Na pua ala mau,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau  hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  2. Nolaila e na hoa,
    E ku a mele pu,
    Hauoli like kakou,
    Ma keia waoakua,
    Ua nui na la i hala,
    Aole kakou i hoomanao,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  3. O Thomas ka mama,
    Ma na ale o ke kai,
    A hiki ma Hawaii,
    Kuka me ka Moi,
    Me na Luna Aupuni,
    Holo ke kuikahi,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  4. Hoopauia o Lokeoki,
    Hoi nele aku ia,
    Ka moana Pakipika,
    Hauoli Hawaii,
    I ka la hope o Iulai,
    Ala ae kakou,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  5. E ala e na keiki,
    O ka Ehu Hau,
    Mele me ka hauoli,
    Hoonani ke Akua,
    Nana kokua mai,
    Ka ea o ka aina,
    Ua hoihoi mai ke ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.

Continue reading

Cannons from the Haaheo o Hawaii wreck, 1857.

Wreck of the “Pride of Hawaii.”

In the year 1824, the yacht of Kamehameha II, called “Ka Haaheo o Hawaii,” formerly the “Cleopatra’s Barge,” was wrecked at Waioli, in the Bay of Hanalei, Kauai. An unsuccessful attempt was made by the chiefs to haul her up on to the shore, but her masts broke off and she rolled back outside the reef, where she was abandoned and lost. We learn from a correspondent of the Hae Hawaii that two of her guns, of which she was provided with four, have been found by divers and brought ashore, together with some of her iron and copper work. What would appear strange in the account of Mr. Hunchback—for that is the name of the Hae‘s correspondent—is the statement that these guns are not in the last bit the worse for their thirty-three year’s submersion, but that, after removing the outside deposite of shells, &c., they were found bright and sound. They are stamped with the date of their manufacture, 1813.

(Polynesian, 5/23/1857, p. 5)

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The Polynesian, Volume XIV, Number 3, Page 5. May 23, 1857.