Patriots celebrate La Hoihoi Ea in lands afar! 1862.

[For the Kuokoa.]

Hoihoi Ea Banquet

FOR THE HAWAIIAN NATION, ON THE 31st OF JULY, 1862.

The 31st of July is a day celebrated by the Hawaiian Nation because it is the day on which the sovereignty of the land was restored, from the year 1843 until this year in which it is remembered. Therefore, we, the natives of Hawaii who live in this strange land, because of our aloha for our land of birth, make this a day of remembrance and a day of prayer, setting aside our labors.

This is what was done on that day: Before that day, food was purchased, and in the morning of that day, the food was cooked first, and all the food was assembled on a table that was covered with the green foliage of the Puluki;¹ and when the conch was sounded, the fellow diners came and sat upon their own seats. Then L. H. Kapuaa stood and spoke of the nature of activities of the day; before the singing. This is one of the songs composed by the youths of the Snow Flurry [na keiki o ka Ehu Hau]. This is it below.

  1. Aloha i ka aina,
    I ke one hanau,
    O ke ao lewa he inoa,
    O ka Haku ka Moi,
    Na keiki kamaaina,
    Na pua ala mau,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau  hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  2. Nolaila e na hoa,
    E ku a mele pu,
    Hauoli like kakou,
    Ma keia waoakua,
    Ua nui na la i hala,
    Aole kakou i hoomanao,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  3. O Thomas ka mama,
    Ma na ale o ke kai,
    A hiki ma Hawaii,
    Kuka me ka Moi,
    Me na Luna Aupuni,
    Holo ke kuikahi,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  4. Hoopauia o Lokeoki,
    Hoi nele aku ia,
    Ka moana Pakipika,
    Hauoli Hawaii,
    I ka la hope o Iulai,
    Ala ae kakou,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  5. E ala e na keiki,
    O ka Ehu Hau,
    Mele me ka hauoli,
    Hoonani ke Akua,
    Nana kokua mai,
    Ka ea o ka aina,
    Ua hoihoi mai ke ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.

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Cannons from the Haaheo o Hawaii wreck, 1857.

Wreck of the “Pride of Hawaii.”

In the year 1824, the yacht of Kamehameha II, called “Ka Haaheo o Hawaii,” formerly the “Cleopatra’s Barge,” was wrecked at Waioli, in the Bay of Hanalei, Kauai. An unsuccessful attempt was made by the chiefs to haul her up on to the shore, but her masts broke off and she rolled back outside the reef, where she was abandoned and lost. We learn from a correspondent of the Hae Hawaii that two of her guns, of which she was provided with four, have been found by divers and brought ashore, together with some of her iron and copper work. What would appear strange in the account of Mr. Hunchback—for that is the name of the Hae‘s correspondent—is the statement that these guns are not in the last bit the worse for their thirty-three year’s submersion, but that, after removing the outside deposite of shells, &c., they were found bright and sound. They are stamped with the date of their manufacture, 1813.

(Polynesian, 5/23/1857, p. 5)

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The Polynesian, Volume XIV, Number 3, Page 5. May 23, 1857.

What was the Bishop Museum Director thinking, 1898.

OLD CANNONS.

When the warship Bennington returned from Kauai, it brought two old cannons from Hanalei, from the place of Judge Thurston [Lunakanawai Kakina], with the thought of the captain that these would be fine objects for the Bishop Museum to display.

He believed that these were cannons from the Russian fort facing Hanalei, but according to Judge Thurston’s statement, they were cannons form the warship of Lunalilo named Haaheo [Haaheo o Hawaii], and it ran aground at Hanalei many years ago.

The director of the Bishop Museum refused to take the guns, and so the captain thinks he will return the guns when he returns to Kauai.

[This was the ship of Liholiho, Kamehameha II, and not Lunalilo. There was much press about it last year! Go check out the exhibit at Kauai Museum on the Haaheo, showing now!! Does anyone know what became of these cannons?]

(Aloha Aina, 12/3/1898, p. 1)

AlohaAina_12_3_1898_1.png

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 49, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 3, 1898.

Ninia Haihailauahiku Kanae dies, 1926.

THAT OLD MOTHER OF WAIKIKI, MRS. N. H. KANAE, PASSES ON.

At 4 o’clock in the morning of Saturday of last week, Mrs. Ninia Haihailauahiku Kanae grew weary of this worldly life at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. Eva Laupoli Perkins, on Liholiho Street in Makiki, at ninety or more years of elderly age, and with her passing to the other side, it would seem that no more are the old-time locals who accompanied the sea spray of Waikiki. Continue reading

Sarai Hiwauli, 1856.

BIOGRAPHY OF S. HIWAULI II.

Sarai Hiwauli was born in Kahaluu, Koolaupoko, after the great plague here on Oahu during the time of Kamehameha I, and she was taken to Hilo, Hawaii to be raised, along with her parents and her kupuna; from Hopuola and Kalimahauna came Hiwauli, from Kahili and Napolo came Hopuola, from Kahiko and Kuanuuanu came Kahili, from Keaweikekino and Iliholo came Kahiko, from Hoou and Kamaiki came Keaweikekino, from Mahiopupelea and Kapaiki came Hoau, from Kanaloauoo and Kapulaiolaa came Kapaihi, from Kahoanokapuokuihewa and Kapahimaiakea came Kapuleiolaa, from Loheakauakeiki and Kalaniheliikauhilonohonua came Kahoanokapuokuihewa, from Kauhealuikawaokalani and LonowahineikahaleIkiopapa came Kalaniheliikauhilonohonua, from Kaholipioku and Moihala came LonowahineikahaleIkiopapa, from Lonoapii and Piilaniwahine came Moihala, and so on. Continue reading

The birth of the future Kamehameha IV, 1839.

Honolulu March 4.

Kinau just gave birth, on the sabbath, Feb. 9, to a son. Kauikeaouli named him, Liholiho, for his older brother who died in foreign lands; and he took him as a child. He is living in the court of the King.

(Lama Hawaii, 3/14/1834, p. 2)

Honolulu Maraki 4.

Ka Lama Hawaii, Makahiki 1, Helu 5, Aoao 2. Maraki 14, 1834.

Restoration Day celebration, day number 3! 1844.

THIRD DAY, AUGUST 2D.

At 4 o’clock, P. M., the guests re-assembled at Mauna Kilika, and formed in nearly the same order of procession as the day before; being this day joined by the ladies of His Majesty’s naturalized subjects—Executive officers—to whom places were courteously assigned, immediately succeeding their Majesties. On this day, no order prescribed the dresses of the ladies, and they consulted their own fanices. The display was rich, and, in contrast with the uniforms of the soldiery, pleasing and highly creditable to their tastes. The entertainment went off with great spirit, and the utmost good humor prevailed. After the regular toasts to their Majesties, the King and Queen, to the Premier, and high officers of State, were given, others rapidly followed, succeeded by short and pithy addresses, which occasioned great applause. On this occasion, the Hon. G. P. Judd, Governor Young, Mr. Ii, J. Ricord, Esq., and Mr. J. F. B. Marshall, spoke: the latter gentleman alluded, with great feeling, to the high commission with which he had been entrusted by His Majesty, the past year, and the respect with which the Envoys of His Majesty, had been received abroad; and concluded with the following sentiment:—

“A speedy return, and hearty welcome to Mess. Haalilio and Richards.”

The dinner was prolonged for several hours, and the house illuminated. In the evening, four veterans of the father of his present Majesty, were introduced, who having seated themselves before the King and Queen, and Premier, after the old Hawaiian custom, with their calabash drums between their legs, commenced a mele, accompanying their song with rapid, and very skillful, manipulations upon their drums, and gesticulations expressive of the sentiment of their song, which was commemorative of the deeds of his warrior father, and in praise of himself and the Premier. These men are almost the only ones remaining who understand the chanting of their ancient meles after this manner, and one of them, from nineteen years disuse, failed before the conclusion. Liholiho, in his reign, kept them constantly about his person, but the taste for their exercises, seems to have almost altogether declined, as but little interest was manifested, by the guests generally, in the performance. It was interesting, however, as a relic of the past, and from its analogy to a custom of the Celtic tribes of Europe, in their era of barbarism. The pleasures of the evening were not confined to the walls of the banqueting house; a numerous crowd was assembled outside, diverted by the music of the band.

At 8 o’clock, P. M. a salute was fired from Punch-bowl, with very grand effect [not legible because of fold in paper] cloud rested over the hill, and when the guns belched forth their thunder in quick succession, lighting up the hill by their flashes, and shaking the houses beneath with their heavy reverberations, it required no lively imagination to fancy that the old crater had awakened from its slumber of ages, and was about to pour a fiery flood upon the town beneath.

Soon after, the troops were re-formed, and His Majesty and the court proceeded to the house of the young chiefs, where the company were very agreeably entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, the teachers of the Royal children; and by the princes and princesses themselves, by their performances on the piano, and social music, both of which was highly creditable to themselves, and gratifying to their parents. The Royal party next proceeded to the mansion of the Hon. Secretary of State. The band assembled in front of the house, playing lively dancing tunes, while the officers of the troops formed themselves into groups and danced with great vigor and animation.

The effect by torch-light was peculiarly striking: all, at intervals waving their swords on high, and joined by the soldiers, giving utterance to deafening cheers, which were borne in the stillness of the night, far and wide.

After experiencing the hospitality of the lady of the Secretary of State, the procession re-formed and marched at quick step towards his Majesty’s residence. The cheering in their progress through the streets was loud and enthusiastic. At 10 o’clock the company took leave of their Majesties.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

THIRD DAY, AUGUST 2D.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1,—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.