Medical school for young Hawaiians, 1870.

Kahunas.

We understand that one of our physicians, who is thoroughly conversant with the native language, has been authorized to form a class of eight or ten Hawaiian young men, (graduates of the highest schools,) for instruction in the principles and practice of medicine.

There has never been made, that we are aware of, any systematic or earnest effort to instruct Hawaiian youth in the medical art. The knowledge that is necessary to be acquired to make a skillful and thoroughly competent practitioner is not to be obtained in this country, which as yet, does not possess medical schools and colleges, and the difficulties in the way of sending Hawaiian pupils abroad to obtain a medical education, are so various and insurmountable, as almost to preclude any hope of being overcome. Continue reading

Death of Abela Kekamakahi in Coloma, California, 1860.

Death in California.

O Hae Hawaii:—Aloha oe:

A friend of ours has died on the 1st of Mei, 1860; that is Abela Kekamakahi, someone loved by everyone.

This is why he died; he had a distended stomach [opu ohao], which he had for four months. He was treated by a haole man, and received comfort, thereafter he relapsed, and a Hawaiian kahuna appeared named Keahilele, and with his treatment, his body received no comfort. Continue reading

Law establishing board to certify medical kahuna, 1868.

HE KANAWAI

E HOONOHO AI I PAPA OLA HAWAII.

NO KA MEA, ua ikeia ka hemahema o na Apana kuaaina o keia Aupuni no na Kahuna Lapaau ole;

A NO KA MEA, ua nui na popilikia o ka lahui Hawaii no ka malama pono ole ia na Kahuna Lapaau maoli.

A NO KA MEA HOI, ua manaoia he mea kupono ka ae ana i na Kahuna Lapaau maoli. NOLAILA: Continue reading

Kahuna lapaau, 1869.

Hawaiian Medicinal Kahuna.—Yesterday the Hawaiian  Board of Health [Papa Ola Hawaii] convened to interview Hawaiian kahuna. There were many kahuna who arrived, perhaps two hundred. It is not known how many were approved.

(Au Okoa, 2/18/1869, p. 2)

AuOkoa_2_18_1869_2.png

Ke Au Okoa, Buke IV, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Feberuari 18, 1869.

Kalaipahoa, and “Hawaiian Art,” 1941.

HAWAII’S WOODEN GODS GOOD POLYNESIAN ART

Huc M. Luquiens Appreciates Carved and Feathered Deities of Ferocious Mien and Lost Symbolism

By LORIN TARR GILL

“If we were forced to choose a single specimen to represent the characteristic art of Polynesia, it might well be one of the extraordinary wooden gods of Hawaii,” Huc Luquiens, assistant professor of art at the University of Hawaii, asserts in his paper on “Hawaiian Art,” soon to be published by the Bishop museum. Continue reading

Clarice Taylor talks of Kilauea place names, 1959.

Clarice B. Taylor’s
Tales about Hawaii

Place Names About Kilauea Crater

Another attempt to destroy Pele and her volcanic fires crops up in a little known legend which comes from the Island of Kauai.

After the death of the Chief Kaha-wali in a lava flow at Puna, Hawaii, the Kauai chiefs determined to make an end to Pele and her antics.

Kauai in those days was famous for having Kahunas (priests) of great spiritual powers. The people of Kauai believed they were strong enough to cope with Pele. So six priests were selected and sent to Hawaii with instructions to go to Kilauea and surround Pele. Continue reading

Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, part V, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

THE PRIESTS PLOT AGAINST KOIHALA

From being a respected and beloved ruler, Koihala became the most hated when he forced his men to climb Mauna Loa and fetch a great ohia log for the heiau he was building at Makanau.

During the wretched trip up into the forests, the Kau men had eaten fern roots, starvation food ordinarily fed pigs and dogs.

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It was during this trip that the priests in charge took pity upon the Kau men doing this forced labor.

The priests had a foreboding that no good could come of the construction of a heiau under these unhappy circumstances. Continue reading