Now this is how it is done, 1919.

MAUI BEAUTY SONG

I Maui au a huli hoi mai,
Loheia mai ana ua meahou,
Ma ka leka au a i ike iho ai,
Na hana hakuepa a ka lokoino;
Owau ka i lawe olelo ia,
He kahuna lapaau hoopunipuni,
O ko’u Makua lani maluna,
O ko’u mua ia ma ka’u hana.
O Kona mana piha ko’u aahu,
O Kana olelo ka’u ai ia,
Ka Uhane Hemolele ko’u Alakai,
A kuu kino a e haaheo nei. Continue reading

Kahuna lapaau and the law, 1886.

AN ACT

To Regulate the Hawaiian Board of Health.

Be it enacted by the King and the Legislative Assembly of the Hawaiian Islands in the Legislature of the Kingdom Assembled:

Section 1. His Majesty the King shall appoint five native Hawaiians to be a Hawaiian Board of Health, and His Majesty the King shall appoint one of them to be President of said Board, and all of said Board shall be persons skilled in the practice of native medicine, of good character, and they shall serve during the King’s pleasure.

Section 2. It shall be the duty of said Hawaiian Board of Health to hear all applications made by native Hawaiians who wish to practice native medicine in this Kingdom for the cure of any kind of disease, or for the cure of chronic diseases or hereditary diseases, or for the cure of broken bones.

Section 3. Said Board, or a majority thereof, shall give to each applicant a certificate certifying to the Minister of the Interior the qualification of the applicant to practice native medicine in any kind of disease, or for the treatment of chronic disease or hereditary diseases, of the cure of broken bones, as may be stated in the application.

Section 4. The Minister of the Interior shall grant on the order of the said Board a license to any applicant who has received a certificate of his qualification to practice medicine in any kind of disease, upon receiving twenty dollars.

Section 5. Every person so licensed to practice medicine, as in Section 4 of this Act specified, shall keep records of his practice of medicine, and shall enter correctly in such records all the business done by him. Any person who shall practice hoomanamana, hoopiopio, anaana, or hoounauna, shall have his license cancelled immediately. Continue reading

“He make no ka ka haole, a he ola no hoi; pela no na Kahuna Hawaii.” 1872.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

LET ALL MEN know the thoughts of the Hawaiian Medical Practitioners [Kahuna Lapaau Hawaii], they who number one hundred and fifty. O Ke Au Okoa, speak their thoughts. About how we will bear this immense right of ours impeccably, without deceit. Let them be instructed to put behind these evil thing: evil sorcery [anaana], imitative magic [hoopiopio], sending spirits [hoounauna], and the deification of all evil things; Continue reading

Some of the battles of Kalaniopuu, 1866.

[Found under: “Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I.”]

The battles between Kalaniopuu, the King of Hawaii, with Kahekili, the King of Maui.

The years 1775, 1776, 1777, 1778, and 1778. Kalaniopuu went to war at Kaupo on Maui, with his Alii, his war Officers, and his soldiers. Kalaniopuu first went to war at Kaupo, and he tortured the makaainana of Kaupo by clubbing their foreheads with his war club [newa]. This battle was called Kalaehohoa [“Clubbing-of-the-Forehead”] Continue reading

On the moving of the Na-ha Stone to Hilo Library 100 years ago, and its history (2 of 6), 1915.

…the bitter words of Keawemauhili for his charge, Naeole gathered the young leaves of the bitter gourd [ipu awaawa] and broiled them until cooked, and fed them to Kamehameha as if it were young taro leaves,  and it is said that Naeole did this so that the biting and bitter words of Keawemauhili for his charge were neutralized, and those words spoken were those famous words of Hawaii nei of the olden days. “Nip the bud of the wauke while still young.” [“E o-u ka maka o ka wauke oi opiopio.”]

When Kamehameha grew older, and his own father, Keouanui, died, believed to have “been fed a cup of koheoheo by Alapainui here in Hilo,” [“hanai apu koheoheo ia e Alapainui ma Hilo nei,”] that is given poison in his food; Kalaniopuu, Keoua’s elder brother, was in the district of Kau, but moved forth to war with Alapainui, and war was fought where Kalaniopuu retreated. Afterwards war was waged upon the Son of Alapainui, and he died near Kawaihae, and all of Hawaii Island became ruled by Kalaniopuu. Continue reading