Name for the new steamship, 1922.

WANTED: NICE NEW NAME FOR NEW INTER-ISLAND STEAMER

Have you a suggestion for a name for the Inter-Island company’s new and palatial steamer for the Honolulu-Hilo run?

J. M. Dowsett, a director of the company, yesterday stated that the company has not selected a name, and so far had not discussed a name, but he added that suggestions would be welcome from the public. Continue reading

Death of Stanley Helani Hulumoe, 1946.

[Found under: “Funeral Announcements”]

HULUMOE, STANLEY HELANI, 75, of Honolulu, born in Kona, Hawaii, 1871, died at the Lunalilo Home, Aug. 7 at 3:35 p. m. Funeral services 11 a. m. today, Aug. 9 at BORTHWICK’S MORTUARY with the Rev. Henry Judd officiating. Continue reading

Name change petition from Kekoa Ah Nee to Liu, 1927.

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETItion of Lily Kekoa Ah Nee, Victoria Yat Kyau Kekoa Ah Nee, Edward Kekoa Ah Nee, George Kekoa Ah Nee, Jr., Violet Kekoa Ah Nee, Keamalu Kekoa Ah Nee, Pearl Kekoa Ah Nee, Jarrett Haalilio Kekoa Ah Nee, for change of name—Decree.

On consideration of the petition of Lily Kekoa Ah Nee, Victoria Yat Kyau Kekoa Ah Nee, Edward Kekoa Ah Nee, George Kekoa Ah Nee, Jr., Violet Kekoa Ah Nee, Keamalu Kekoa Ah Nee, Pearl Kekoa Ah Nee and Jarrett Haalilio Kekoa Ah Nee for a decree changing their names to Myra Liu, Victoria Yat Kyau Liu, Edward Ah Yen Liu, Raymond Liu, Violet Liu, Keamalu Meribah Liu, Pearlie Liu and Jarrett Liu, and there appearing to me to be good reasons for granting the same:

Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority in me by law vested, and thereunto enabling, I, Raymond C. Brown, Acting Governor of the Territory of Hawaii, do hereby order and decree that the names of Lily Kekoa Ah Nee, Victoria Yat Kyau Kekoa Ah Nee, Edward Kekoa Ah Nee, George Kekoa Ah Nee, Jr., Violet Kekoa Ah Nee, Keamalu Kekoa Ah Nee, Pearl Kekoa Ah Nee and Jarrett Haalilio Kekoa Ah Nee, be and hereby are changed to Myra Liu, Victoria Yat Kyau Liu, Edward Ah Yen Liu, Raymond Liu, Violet Liu, Keamalu Meribah Liu, Pearlie Liu and Jarrett Liu, and that a copy of this decree be published for at least four consecutive weeks in the “Honolulu Star-Bulletin,” a newspaper of general circulation in the Territory of Hawaii, published at Honolulu, Oahu, in said Territory.

Dated, October 19, A. D. 1927, at Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii.

RAYMOND C. BROWN.
(SEAL) Acting Governor of Hawaii

[I am not sure when George Kekoa Ah Nee became Charles Kekoa Liu.]

(Star-Bulletin, 11/12/1927, p. 15)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXXV, Number 11,186, Page 15. November 12, 1927.

Death of a different George Makalena, 1878.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Death of G. C. McLean.—This past Tuesday, Keoki Makalena [George McLean], a haole very familiar to there people here in Honolulu, died; and he was the one who owns the Shop called, “Ka Halekuai Bolabola.”*

[Oftentimes foreign people were given Hawaiianized names like Makalena for McLean, Wilikina for Wilson, or Poe for Boyd. I have started tracking some of these names, because I think it would be helpful when doing research in Hawaiian language documents. See the list by clicking here.]

*George Christie McLean was also known to Hawaiians as Bolabola. His store seems to have been known in English as George C. McLean’s Store.

(Kuokoa, 12/14/1878, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVII, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 14, 1878.

Amendment to the law about naming, 1872.

HE KANAWAI

E hoololi ana i ke kanawai i kapaia he kanawai e hooponopono ana i na inoa; i hooholoia ma ka la 24 o Augate, M. H. 1860.

E hooholoia e ka Moi a me ka Hale Ahaolelo o ko Hawaii Pae Aina i akoakoa iloko o ka Ahaolelo Kau Kanawai o ke Aupuni:

Pauku 1. E hoololiia a ma keia ua hoololiia no ka Pauku 6 o ke kanawai i kapaia “He Kanawai e hooponopono ana i na inoa,” i hooholoia ma ka la 24 o Augate, M. H. 1860, e pakui aku i kela Pauku 6 i na huaolelo, penei: “Koe nae mamuli o ka olelo hooholo a ke ‘Lii ka Moi iloko o ka Ahakukamalu, i hookumuia kela olelo hooholo maluna o ka palapala hoopii o ka mea e makemake ana e hoololi i kona inoa, a e hoolaha pono ia no ka lohe ana o ka lehulehu, aole e emi malalo o na hebedoma eha iloko o kekahi nupepa i oleloia maloko o ua olelo hooholo nei,” a e  heluheluia ua pauku la penei: Continue reading

Namaielua Kaikioewa Kiaaina, 1921.

Don’t Worry, Live Long, Kamaaina Centenarian Says

Sprightly Citizen of 104 Calls at Tribune Office, Tells Longevity Secret

Do you think you have any chance of living more than a hundred years?

Follow the simple, temperate and non-worrying habits of N. K. Kiaaina, of Wahiawa, Hanapepe, Koloa, and you may go beyond the century mark. Kiaaina will be 104 years old the 21st of next month. So far as is known he is the oldest inhabitant of the Island of Hawaii. Continue reading

More on Kiaaina, 1919.

Past Hundred Yet Is Active In Politics

An interesting fact has been brought out during the course of registering the comparatively few men who have so far put down their names as voters in Hilo. An even older man than H. Elderts, the Puna age marvel, has been discovered. He is Namaielua K. Kiaaina, a Hawaiian, born on Kauai in the year 1817. The old man gives his age as more than 102 years. Elderts, who has long been thought to be the oldest man in the territory, only claims to be 101 years of age, so Kiaainna, who resides at Honolii, takes the palm. Continue reading

Travels of King Kamehameha IV to see the sounding sands of Nohili and more, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

We hear of the sailing of the King from here, and on the next day he landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night, he sailed to Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They spent the Sabbath there, and joined together and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the weekday, the rode horse, fished; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. That evening, they got on board the Maria and sailed for Kaula. The next morning they reached there. Some of them jumped into the ocean and swam ashore with difficulty, for there was a shark there and it was difficult to go ashore; there is a severe cliff and no bay. The King went ashore amongst these difficulties, ascended the cliff. The chiefesses remained on the ship. Continue reading