Travels of King Kamehameha IV to see the sounding sands of Nohili and more, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

We hear of the sailing of the King from here, and on the next day he landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night, he sailed to Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They spent the Sabbath there, and joined together and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the weekday, the rode horse, fished; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. That evening, they got on board the Maria and sailed for Kaula. The next morning they reached there. Some of them jumped into the ocean and swam ashore with difficulty, for there was a shark there and it was difficult to go ashore; there is a severe cliff and no bay. The King went ashore amongst these difficulties, ascended the cliff. The chiefesses remained on the ship. Continue reading

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First birthday of Royalist Campbell, 1894.

“Royalist Campbell.”

That is the name of the new baby of Mr. and Mrs. J. Campbell, born on the 14th of May, 1893; and this makes a year of her being made familiar with the royalist people, who a steadfast behind Queen Liliuokalani. Continue reading

Clarice Taylor talks of Kilauea place names, 1959.

Clarice B. Taylor’s
Tales about Hawaii

Place Names About Kilauea Crater

Another attempt to destroy Pele and her volcanic fires crops up in a little known legend which comes from the Island of Kauai.

After the death of the Chief Kaha-wali in a lava flow at Puna, Hawaii, the Kauai chiefs determined to make an end to Pele and her antics.

Kauai in those days was famous for having Kahunas (priests) of great spiritual powers. The people of Kauai believed they were strong enough to cope with Pele. So six priests were selected and sent to Hawaii with instructions to go to Kilauea and surround Pele. Continue reading

The beginning of Mary Kawena Pukui & Margaret Titcomb’s list of sea creatures, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

Here below is a list of names of some Hawaiian sea creatures that are written down in a book of names of the Kamehameha Museum.

The director of the Museum wrote that if some of our oldsters can write down the names and descriptions of the fishes.

That director wrote that he will pay the cost of one year’s subscription to the newspaper Ka Hoku o Hawaii, if he receives some fish names and a description of them, like if it is long, or striped, and so forth.

Here below is a list of names of some fishes sent in by Mrs. Mary Kawena Pukui and Mrs. Makalika Titcomb [Margaret Titcomb]. Continue reading