Fanny Thomas Gulick dies in Kobe, Japan, 1883.

MRS. FANNY T. GULICK.

From the latest news received last week we hear that Mrs. F. T. Gulika has died, the wife of Rev. J. P. Gulika, one of the old teachers who brought righteousness to this Archipelago. Our readers will perhaps not have forgotten the Gulick family in Hawaii nei, and the departure of the two in their old and weak days to go to Japan to live with their children. Continue reading

Death of Anna Maria Dimond, 1893.

Death of Kaimana Wahine.

In the evening of this past Monday, at the hour of 7:30, Mrs. Anna Maria Dimond let go of her breath, the aged companion of this life of Mr. Henry Dimond, at the age of 85.

She was born in the city of New York on the 19th of May, 1808. She married Henry Dimond on November 3, 1834, and landed in Honolulu in June [6,] 1835, along with Titus Coan [Koana] and Edwin Oscar Hall [Holo] folks. With the death of E. O. Hall, the Dimonds were the only ones left from those who came on the same journey here. Continue reading

Marriage of Mikala Kamalimali, April 24, 1839.

Puawaina, May 6, 1839.

A MARRIAGE.

Hear me, O K. H. [Kumu Hawaii Newspaper]

I am telling you of something that I witnessed.

Mr. Sila* of the United States was married to a woman here in Honolulu; Mikala Kamalimali is the name of his wife, the daughter of Mamala; the 24th of April was when they were married, at the house of Bingham [Binamu], the pastor here in Honolulu. Continue reading

Stephen L. Desha reflects on the death of Stephen William Kekuewa, 1920.

REV. S. W. KEKUEWA HAS PASSED ON

Rev. Stephen William Kekuewa let go of this life at 4 o’clock in the afternoon of this past Wednesday, Nov. 3, 1920, and let go of this worldly life at the home of his beloved daughter, Mrs. John P. Kupua, on North School Street, in Honolulu. Continue reading

Just a little more on William S. Kioula marriage, 1920.

Centenarian Takes Bride of 60 Years

Hawaiian Born Before First Missionaries Came To Islands Married Wednesday Night

William S. Kioula, who will be a century old tomorrow, and Mrs. Lokalia Wahinenui, 61, were married on Wednesday evening, at Kawaiahao church by the pastor, Rev. Akaiko Akana, in the presence of many friends of the couple. The official witnesses to the ceremony were David Naeole and Charles A. Reeves, the latter being related by marriage to Mrs. Kioula.

Kioula, who looks not over 60, says he was born in Kona, Hawaii, a month before the landing of the first Christian Missionaries in the islands, which occurred in Kioula’s district of the Big Island. Honolulu’s oldest bridegroom was among the first native children to be christened by the missionaries. Continue reading

This missionary ship, Hokuao, quarantined for two weeks, 1881.

The ship, Hokuao [Hoku Ao; Morning Star] will be quarantined for two weeks before sailing for Micronesia, so that it does not carry smallpox to that archipelago. Continue reading

Letter pertaining to plight of William Kanui, 1863.

Pertaining to  William Tennoee [William Tenoee] Alias Kanui.

We heard from Rev. S. C. Damon, the Pastor at the Bethel Church [ka Halepule Betela] at Polelewa, Honolulu, that he received a letter from San Francisco, pertaining to the old Hawaiian that is living in that city, that being the one named above, and he is living there in severe poverty and in difficulty. Kanui has been living in foreign lands since a long time ago, perhaps more than fifty years. Continue reading

Arrival of Catholic priests and nuns, including Damien de Veuster, 1864.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

New Priests and Nuns.—With the arrival of the ship R. W. Wood, from Europe, last week Saturday, arrived on board were new Priests and student priests and Nuns of the true Catholic faith. Here are their names: Continue reading

Capt. Andrew Henri Blanchard, 1920.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

When researching the history of Captain Blanchard, the one who brought the Missionaries to Hawaii nei, it was found that he was the actual father of John H. Wilson’s grandfather on his mother’s [Eveline M. Townsend’s] side. On his father’s side, that being Charles B. Wilson; Charles B. Wilson is an actual grandson of Captain Wilson, and it was Capt. Wilson who took the first missionaries to the Tahitian archipelago.

Continue reading