“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

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Missionary advice about mele, 1860.

Pertaining to Mele

Perhaps all of the mele of the olden days are almost gone; those who know them are but a few. This is regretful because through those mele we can know how people lived a long, long ago, and the stories of the land as well. The means by which the mele will survive forever and not disappear is by printing them in books and maybe in newspapers; that way the future generations can read and contemplate and know of the misconceptions of their kupuna and not follow in their misguided footsteps. Continue reading

Lydia Bingham returns to head the Honolulu Female Seminary, 1867

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

Honolulu Female Seminary.—In our advertising columns will be seen the advertisement of the Honolulu Female Academy, which is another of the schools provided by Christian benevolence for the benefit of the children of this highly favored land. This institution will, it is hoped, supply a felt need for a home for girls, in the town of Honolulu, yet not too near its center of business. It is being commenced in the substantial buildings erected many years since by the American Mission as a printing house and bindery, in connection with the premises of the Rev. E. W. Clark, Continue reading

On sacred stones, 1921.

THE STONE FISH GODDESS “MALEI” TO BE RETURNED TO MAKAPUU

Hawaiians have not forgotten the story about the stone goddess called “Malei,” a stone deity cared for and worshiped by the Hawaiian fishermen in the olden days; the great fish that the stone deity always brought to shore was the uhu, as is seen in the story of Hiiaka:

“Aia la o ka uku kai o Makapuu,
He i’a ia na Malei na ka wahine e noho ana i ka ulu a ka makani,
I Koolau ke ola i ka huaka’i malihini,
Kanaenae a Hiiaka i ka poli o Pele,
E Malei e, i halekipa ke aloha, e uwe mai!’

[There are the uhu of Makapuu which swim in procession,
Fish of Malei that dwells in the rising winds,
In Koolau lies the sustenance for the unfamiliar travellers,
Hiiakaikapoliopele prays,
O Malei, welcome us in love; let us weep!]

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Monument to Father Damien, 1894.

MEMORIAL TO DAMIEN

Monument on Molokai.

We are publishing above the monument; the statue built for father Damiana who died at Kalawao, Molokai, from leprosy which he contracted. A large sum of money was donated at London and $500 was put aside to build this monument was constructed. This memorial was brought here in 1893 and erected on the 12th of September of this year on Molokai by the Provisional Government.

(Kuokoa, 5/19/1894, p. 1)

Kuokoa_5_19_1894_1.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIII, Helu 20, Aoao 1. Mei 19, 1894.

Death of Simeon Kaiu, 1835.

PERTAINING TO THE DEATH OF SIMEONA KAIU.

Waimea, September 26, 1835.

Aloha to you, O Tinker. This is my thought for you. One of our fellow travellers has recently died, Simeon Kaiu, he has died. He was not terribly sick, and he died. Perhaps one of his blood vessels severed in his chest, and he could not breathe, and he died. September 11 was the day he died. We know how he lived, when we travelled to Nuuhiwa and came back. His was as kindly as ever, as he did the work of the Lord. Simeon and Deborah [Debora] were in Wailua a few months ago spreading the word of God. They showed those ignorant ones of enlightenment. He lived there, where he died. He was a greatly beloved brethren on Kauai. He is much mourned for in this land. He is one of the first fruit picked here in Hawaii. He was baptized in the month of December, 1825. The baptism took place in Honolulu with Kaahumanu. From that time until he died, we know not of any wrong he committed, from what we saw he only did good. Simeona did not make clear what his thoughts were upon his leaving, for he died quickly. When he lived amongst us, we witnessed the fruit of the Spirit. Therefore we believe that he is doing well in that life. “Blessed is that servant, whom his lord when he cometh shall find so doing.”—Luke xii—43.

By Whitney.

[According to S. M. Kamakau, on December 4, 1825, baptized were: E. Kaahumanu, Kalanimoku, A. Keliiahonui, Lidia Namahana, Kekuaipiia, Gikeona Laanui, Simeona Kaiu, Debora Kapule Haakulou, and R. Kalaaiaulu.]

(Kumu Hawaii, 10/14/1835, p. 165)

KumuHawaii_10_14_1835_165.png

Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 1, Pepa 21, Aoao 165. Okatoba 14, 1835.

Marble memorial to Lorenzo Lyons, 1886.

A CALL TO THE SUNDAY SCHOOLS ALL AROUND THE ARCHIPELAGO.

By the kindness of the Father, God, and Lord Jesus Christ, taken from the circle of our living was our dearly beloved father, Rev. L. Laiana, and he left behind his benevolent works for which our people are greatly indebted, as a monument [kia hoomanao] before our eyes, and before all of the Sunday School students around the Archipelago [Pae Aina].

Therefore, at the meeting of your Executive Committee [Komite Hooko], held on the 9th of November, at Kaumakapili, it was unanimously decided to erect a Marble Monument for the father, Rev. L. Laiana, and to enclose it in a fine iron fence.
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