100 years since the Missionaries left Boston, 1919.

YESTERDAY MADE A FULL ONE-HUNDRED YEARS SINCE THE MISSIONARIES LEFT BOSTON.

The image below is of the very first group of Missionaries to leave Boston, on the 23 of the month of October, 1819. Yesterday makes a full one hundred years from their leaving America aboard the brig [mokupe’a] Thaddeus, and landed at Kailua, Hawaii, on the 4th of April, 1820. Seen are each of their names beneath their pictures; and on the 10th of April of this coming year, it will be a hundred years since their arrival in Hawaii nei, with commemorations held for them by Hawaii’s people in this town. Continue reading

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Lydia Bingham returns to head the Honolulu Female Seminary, 1867

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

Honolulu Female Seminary.—In our advertising columns will be seen the advertisement of the Honolulu Female Academy, which is another of the schools provided by Christian benevolence for the benefit of the children of this highly favored land. This institution will, it is hoped, supply a felt need for a home for girls, in the town of Honolulu, yet not too near its center of business. It is being commenced in the substantial buildings erected many years since by the American Mission as a printing house and bindery, in connection with the premises of the Rev. E. W. Clark, Continue reading

Timoteo Haalilio, 1845.

SOME THINGS PERTAINING TO HAALILIO.

Koolau, Oahu, was where he was born; his parents were prominent people. His father died when he was a youth, and thereafter his mother (that being Eseka who is still living) became Governor of Molokai. When he was 8 years old, he joined the family of the King, Kamehameha III, and lived with them. They were at Hilo at this time. When he was 13, Haalilio entered the school of Bingham [Binamu] in Honolulu, and he studied English and…

(Elele, 4/25/1845, p. 13)

Elele_4_25_1845_13.png

Ka Elele, Buke I, Pepa 2, Aoao 13, Aperila 25, 1845.

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The marriage of Kauikeaouli to Kalama Kapakuhaili, 1837.

MARRIAGE OF THE KING.

Honolulu, Feb. 2, 1837.

KAUIKEAOULI the King of the Hawaiian archipelago and KALAMA, the daughter of Naihekukui was wed by Mr. Bingham [Binamu].

At the stone house of Kekauluohi and Kanaina, the aunty and uncle [makua] of that girl, is where their marriage took place, and the wedding reception of the Alii, and the singing of the marriage hymn. After that, they went to pray at the church that night at the great assembly. “Marriage is honourable in all.” And this marriage is greatly respected by their true friends.

Long live the King!

May his kingdom have great peace.

(Kumu Hawaii, 2/1/1837, p. 72)

KA MARE ANA O KE LII.

Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 2, Pepa 18, Aoao 72. Feberuari 1, 1837.

History of Kawaiahao Church, 1885.

KAWAIAHAO CHURCH

The readers of the Kuokoa will probably not be unable to recognize the features of the building pictured above; it is the church of Kawaiahao. It is an old building and one that is greatly beloved by a portion of our people, this mother church of ours. Its predecessor on these grounds was a church of pili grass; and the stone building was completed in 1842, constructed by the loving hands of the alii and makaainana of times gone by. It was Kekuanaoa and Bingham [Binamu] Sr. who selected the area where it was to be built and supervised its construction, however Bingham returned to America before the completion of this building.

There were many renowned events which were done in Kawaiahao such that it is as if the building was the place to carry out grand and fine deeds of the past, of the nation and the people. It was in this building that a number of the Legislative Sessions of the nation were opened, if this writer is not mistaken. It was in this building that Kamehameha V opened the Constitutional Convention [Ahaolelo Hooponopono Kumukanawai] on the 7th of July, 1864. Continue reading

Hiram Bingham and history, 1835.

Hear me, O Kepookulou, and those with knowledge, who have heard of the way of life of the alii of Hawaii of which you showed to us. You told us of the genealogy of this line of alii for fifty-seven generations, and we publish it in the Kumu Hawaii so that it is permanent, so that all the people and youth of Hawaii nei will understand from now into the future.

Where are these alii? They have all died. There is just one remaining. How did they live? People who know and who have heard, do tell us. When did they rule? We know the time of Liholiho and Kamehameha and Kalanikupuapaikalaninui, but the majority of them, we don’t know when they ruled. Continue reading