Kaheleiki trial in California, 1863.

NOTES OF THE WEEK.

A Hawaiian Indicted in California.—Among the passengers by the Yankee are the Hon. Messrs. John Ii, J. Kapaakea and C. G. Hopkins, who go to San Francisco to attend the trial of a Hawaiian seaman, named Heleiki, indicted for the murder of one Capt. ________ at sea, about the year 1851 or 2. Continue reading

E o, e Ka Walu o Na Lani! 1875.

Birthday of the Princess Liliu.

This past Thursday, September 2, made the thirty-seventh year of Her Highness, the Princess for whom is this kahoahoa:

O Liliu o Loloku
O Walania i ke kii onohi
O ka onohi o Kalani Nui
Ke ka Hiwauli o Ku
O Kamakaeha o Kina.

She was born at Mana, Manamana, Honolulu, on September 2, 1838, a royal daughter of Caisara Kapaakea and A. Keohokalole and she was a younger sibling of the Alii, King Kalakaua. Continue reading

More on the Honorable Lilia Kamakaeha Paki’s marriage, 1862.

The Ones Who Were Married.

At 8 o’clock at night, on the 16th of this month, the Honorable Lilia Kamakaeha Paki was married to Adjutant General, Major John O. Dominis at Haleakala, the house of the Honorable C. R. Bishop and A. Pauahi Bishop. The ones who attended the royal bride were Elizabeth Kekaaniau Laanui and Martha Swinton; those attending the groom were the Honorable Colonel D. Kalakaua and William Allen [? William Allani] (of Kawaihae).

Present were the Chief, the King; her Highness Princess V. Kaahumanu, his Highness L. Kamehameha; the Honorable Governor Kekuanaoa; Colonel P. Y. Kekuaokalani; and the parents of the bride, and the parent and cousins of the groom.

The ones to be wed were gathered and they went out and entered the great parlor and it was there that the couple stood.

The uniting of the pair was done with much reverence, and all the proceedings of the wedding were fine, as well as with the attendants.

The Rev. C. Damon stood and began the marriage ceremony; then the ring and the marriage fee [? ka uku o ka mare ana] was given to the groom, from the groom to the bride, and from the bride to the Priest; the Priest took the fee and gave the ring once more to the groom, who put it on the brideʻs finger. When this was done, the groom was made to give his vow and then the bride. The couple were questioned, and then the two knelt down and Priest gave a prayer, and after the prayer, the Priest asked, “Who will give this woman to this man?” The Honorable C. R. Bishop stood and took the hand of the bride and gave it to the groom; the Honorable A. Pauahi Bishop, the parents of the couple and everyone else stood once more and approached. Everyone was full of joy for this beautiful wedding.

In midday of that very day, a party was given for their cortege, and all who found themselves amongst that fine gathering felt admiration.

After the marriage of the alii, the attendants returned to their sides until they reached Washington Place [Wasenetona Hale], the place of residence of the groom.

It is said that this is the second of the righteous marriages known in our tiny Kingdom, and by glancing through the gate, it is indeed righteous.

These are fine examples for those who are not married, so that the Royal family that associates with the multitudes will become numerous. There are but a few High Chiefs born of the land left, and with this marriage to a haole Royal one, it is hoped that the Royal couple live righteously along with the prayer that they bear good fruit of the sacred descent of the line of Heulu.

[Does anyone know if Pauahi had a name that started with an “A.”? For some reason she is here twice referred to as A. Pauahi Bihopa.]

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 9/18/1862, p. 2)

Na mea Mare.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika Buke I, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 18, 1862.

Marriage of Liliuokalani and John Owen Dominis, 1862.

Marriage.—At 8 in the evening of Tuesday, the 16th of this month, the Honorable Lydia Kamakaeha Paki and Adjutant General Major J. O. Dominis were wed at the Residence of the Honorable C. R. Bishop and his Queen. The two were married in the Anglican faith.

Present were the King; her Highness Princess V. K. Kaahumanu; his Highness Prince L. Kamehameha; the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa, the Royal Governor of Oahu; Colonel Peter Young Kekuaokalani; also there were the parents of the bride, and the mother of the groom, and his cousins.

Rev. Samuel C. Damon was who performed the ceremony. It was appreciated for its righteousness and honor. With the two of them are the thoughts of aloha of this paper.

(Kuokoa, 9/20/1862, p. 3)

Mareia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 20, 1862.

More on Kaheleiki trial: “Something not to be forgotten.” 1863.

Voyage of the Hawaiian Chiefs to San Francisco.

This past Wednesday morning [4/15/1863], the Honorable C. Gordon Hopkins [Hapakini], John Ii [Ioane Ii], Kaisara Kapaakea [Caesar Kapaakea], and J. Koii Unauna, along with the one who is involved in the dispute for whom they went to testify for, namely Harry Kaheleiki, came to shore riding aboard the ship, Yankee; and we are pleased to report the public that they are in good health.

During the trial of Harry Kaheleiki in San Francisco, there were many witnesses strongly against him; however, with the arrival of the alii mentioned above, there was true testimony in favor of the accused, and the error of those who testified against him was clear. The newspapers of San Francisco were filled with thoughts of appreciation for this Nation sending witnesses at much expense to have one of its citizens wrongly charged in a foreign land set free; according to one of the papers, this is a benevolent act not done by the enlightened Nations of the world, and so the Hawaiian Nation has taken the lead in this fine action. This is truly an act of aloha, and it is something not to be forgotten for all times.

The reason it was heard that a Hawaiian was being imprisoned in San Francisco was because of Doctor Gulick [Gulika], the one who was previously living in the islands of Micronesia, and due to weakening health, arrived in California. While he was in San Francisco several months ago, he heard that there was a Hawaiian man being held in one of the Jails there on the charge of murder; he therefore went quickly to meet with the man, and when he got there, he spoke with the aforementioned Kaheleiki, and though this conversation, it was clear in Doctor Gulick’s mind that the accused was innocent. And because Kaheleiki asked him if they could wait until witnesses were sent for from Hawaii for him, there would be many who would testify that he was innocent of the charges against him. So Doctor Gulick immediately went to the office of the Hawaiian Consul, Mr. Hitchcock [Kanikela Hawaii o Mr. Hikikoki], and told him about the circumstances of Kaheleiki and how he was certain that Kaheleiki was innocent of the charges. When the Hawaiian Consul heard of this, he went at once to meet with the accused, and upon seeing his demeanor and what he had to say, he knew for himself that Kaheleiki was innocent. He then went quickly to see the Judge to ask that the trial of Kaheleiki be postponed until he heard from here; for he had witnesses here for him. And that is how time was given to send his witnesses, and that is how he was freed. And when he sent for witnesses here, along with a letter from Doctor Gulick, and when His Highness L. Kamehameha heard of this, he along with Sheriff W. C. Parke put great effort into finding appropriate witnesses to testify for Kaheleiki, the one who was falsely charged. We are filled with appreciation for the Royal One, His Highness, and the Sheriff.

We must thank Doctor Gulick, and we are truly thankful for him in the name of all who desire that the innocent who are persecuted be freed, and in the name of all who strive to find ways to free the innocent from the hands of those who oppose them, while they live in foreign lands. God shall free the righteous.

[There are countless stories like this in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers that should be relearned and retold and retold again, so they are not forgotten!]

(Kuokoa, 4/18/1863, p. 3)

Ka Huakai a na 'Lii Hawaii i Kapalakiko.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke II, Helu 16, Aoao 3. Aperila 18, 1863.

More on the Kaheleiki trial, 1863.

This past Tuesday [2/17/1863], the Honorable C. Kapaakea, and  J. Koii, and C. G. Hopkins also went aboard the ship Yankee, to appear in a case raised between the haole and Kaheleiki; the Honorable John Ii also accompanied them to San Francisco, and this paper hopes and prays that the fringes of the winds; the gentle winds of the coconut fronds of Kona take them to their destination, and that they are brought back by the soft puffs of the wind of Sakameka [? Sacramento]; “Pleasant passage,” according to the haole.

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 2/19/1863, p. 2)

Ma ka poalua iho nei...

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke 2, Helu 19, Aoao 2. Feberuari 19, 1863.

Government officials to go to California to defend a Hawaiian citizen. 1863.

The Honorable C. Kapaakea and J. K. Unauna are headed to California on Monday. We have heard it is to serve as witness in the murder case of Kaheleiki, who is a Hawaiian. May the alii going remain in good health. It is however believed that the Honorable C. G. Hopkins [Hapakini] will accompany the witnesses.

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 2/5/1863, p. 2)

E holo ana ka Mea Hanohano C. Kapaakea...

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika. Buke 2, Helu 17, Aoao 2. Feberuari 5, 1863.