First birthday of Carrie Akau celebrated and other wild news from Kawaihae Kai, 1916.

EXPRESSION OF AFFECTION FROM KAWAIHAE KAI

Ka Hoku o Hawaii,

Aloha oe.

At 12 o’clock on the 12th of this month, August, W. P. Akau, policeman of Kawaihae, and his wife commemorated the first birthday of their baby. The name of the child is Carrie Akau. Your writer and his family were invited along with all those of Kawaihae to go to this celebratory banquet for the birthday of this child prepared by her parents, and before ten kupuna of each, your writer was asked by Mrs. W. P. Akau to give words of prayer to the Heavenly Father, before the eating, and this invitation was complied to by your writer to appeal to the Heavenly Father to lengthen the life of this child whose the day was for, and that she dwell in peace and protection from above, by his incomparable grace.

A FIGHT CAUSED BY KIAWE.

On the 14th of August, some women of the Kololio Wind of Puako took to fisticuffs. The reason was that Mrs. A. K. took kiawe that belonged to Mrs. K. A., which resulted in that woman becoming angry that the result of her labor was being taken, and Mrs. K. A. forbade Mrs. A. K., saying, “Don’t you take that bag of kiawe, that is my bag of kiawe.” Continue reading

Great granddaughter born to Samuel K. Kekoowai, 1922.

ANOTHER DESCENDANT BORN TO THE WRITER OF THE MAKALEI

A letter arrived from my granddaughter informing her tutu that she brought forth into this world of light, a daughter from her loins, on Thursday, the 12th of this October, 1922, at 9:30 a.m.

She asked also for me to name that great-grandchild of mine, and so I followed through and gave the ancestral name, Miss May Kaaoliko Kahalakupumaikai-o-Aina-manuhaaipo Manouluae. Continue reading

The extent of the Hawaiian Kingdom, 1857.

By Authority.

[CIRCULAR.]

Department of Foreign Relations,
City of Honolulu, 16 March, 1856 [1857].

Sir:—I have the honor to make known to you that the following islands, &c., are within the domain of the Hawaiian Crown, viz:

Hawaii, containing about 4,000 square miles.

Maui, ” ” 600 ” “

Oahu, ” ” 520 ” “

Kauai, ” ” 520 ” “

Molokai, ” ” 170 ” “

Lanai, ” ” 100 ” “

Niihau, ” ” 80 ” “

Kahoolawe, ” ” 60 ” “

6,050

Nihoa, known as Bird Island.

Molokini, Lehua, Kaula, Islets, little more than barren rocks;—

and all Reefs, Banks and Rocks contiguous to either of the above, or within the compass of the whole.

With the highest respect, I have the honor to be, Sir,

Your most obd’t, humble servant,

R. C. WYLLIE.

To William Miller, Esq., H. B. M.’s Commissioner, &c. &c. &c.

Monsieur,

Monsieur Louis Emile Perrin, Consul Commissioner and Plenipotentiary, of H. I. M., &c. &c. &c.

Hon. David L. Gregg, U. S. Commissioner, &c., &c., &c.

(Polynesian, 3/28/1857, p. 2)

Polynesian_3_28_1857_2.png
The Polynesian, Volume XIII, Number 47, Page 2. March 28, 1857.

 

 

Kamehameha IV visits Nihoa, 1857.

The French man of war “Eurydice” arrived from Nihoa with Kamehameha IV, the King, and the Governor of Oahu [Kekuanaoa], on the 25th of April.

They were on Nihoa touring, and the trip was fine, and they returned in good health. They brought back three “Elephants of the sea,” from there.

Tomorrow, the vessel will return to Oahu.

Hanalei, Kauai, Ap. 27, 1857.

(Hae Hawaii, 5/13/1857, p. 26)

HaeHawaii_5_13_1857_26
Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou.—Helu 7, Aoao 26. Mei 13, 1857.

John Smith, flautist for Kamehameha III, and land rights, 1904.

HAS DECLARED THIS ACTION GOOD

INTERESTING CASE BEFORE LAND COURT—A NEGRO FLUTE PLAYER AS A COURT MUSICAN—COOKE HOMESTEAD CLEAR.

Enoch Johnson, as examiner of titles, is the author of an opinion filed in the Torrens Land Court to the effect that one John Smith, a negro flute-player for Kamehameha III was owner of a valuable piece of land on Young street, for which application was made for a Torrens title by C. M. Cooke, Limited. As the negro got the California gold fever and left, disappearing and leaving no heirs, Johnson comes to the conclusion that the property reverts to the Territory. Judge Weaver, however, differs, from this opinion and holds that the petitioner is entitled to a clear title.

The land was granted to the flute-player by Royal Patent 26, on July 17, 1847, by King Kamehameha III. Twenty-five years ago it was used as a pasture land, in the old days when its value was a mere trifle. It is now residence property. When the gold fever broke out in California flute-player Smith gave up both his job as a royal musician and his land near what then was of Honolulu then and left with some other negroes for California. He has never been heard of since and adverse possession has long since run against him or his heirs.

Enoch Johnson, however declares in his report to the court that adverse possession does not run against the government and that the law provides that property left without heirs shall escheat to the government. Here he holds that the Attorney General should be notified and that Smith’s “estate” is escheated to the government.

“I have to disagree with the conclusions of law set forth in the opinion” says Judge Weaver in his decision filed yesterda. “I am of the opinion that the applicant shows a prima facie case of title. The Territory of Hawaii has no title in the lands by reason of the law of escheat, for the reason that no ‘inquest of office’ has been had to take possession of the land. The abstract of title shows that the applicant is entitled to a fee simple title subject to a life interest in C. M. Cooke and his wife, Anna C. Cooke, as set forth in their deed to Charles M. Cooke, Limited.”

(Hawaiian Star, 6/23/1904, p. 8)

HawaiianStar_6_23_1904_8.png
The Hawaiian Star, Volume XII, Number 3824, Page 8. June 23, 1904.

Mango jam? Sounds ono, 1936.

BUSINESSMAN HAS OWN RECIPE FOR RIPE MANGO JAM

With mango trees loaded with fruits its almost a crime to let all the luscious fruit go to waste.

That’s the opinion of Robert F. Lange, Honolulu businessman, who is no mean chef himself when it comes to stirring up tempting dishes.

Mr. Lange suggests that more island housewives use the ripe mangoes for making mango jam, which is easily made and delicious to eat.

Here’s his easy recipe.

To each pound of sliced mangoes, use one pound of sugar. Use mashed lemon or shredded pineapple, to each pound and one half of mangoes. Cook together until thick, pour into glases and seal.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 8/5/1936, p. 1)

HokuoHawaii_8_5_1936_1.png
Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXI, Number 14, Aoao 1. August 5, 1936.