One year after Pearl Harbor, 1942.

This Makes a Full Year

Monday last was a year since the bombing of Puuloa by the those who carried out the coup and stole the lives of people thinking that is what will give them victory.

The 7th of December is a day we probably will never forget for all times, for while the navy and the land of America were enjoying their time, the raider carried out his work which was planned ahead of time, to fly to America to the path of Puuloa, and let down messengers of destruction to cripple the condition of the military of the United States of America.

With America being secretly attacked, that served as a needle poking at the side of the Americans like a spur [kui ke-pa] being thrust into the underside of a horse.

In response to these actions by the raider and assassin, the one who stirred the coals that are burning in the hearts of true Americans, and it became something that inflamed the thoughts of Americans. Continue reading

Less than four months before Pearl Harbor, 1941.

Shadow of War Spreads Over the Pacific

With Japanese troops reported invading southern Indo-China and threatening Thailand (1), better known as Siam, American naval officials engage in a last-minute checkup of the great Hawaiian Naval base at Pearl Harbor (2). This map shows the areas controoled by the U. S., Britain and Russia, which are cooperating in the war on Fascism, and by Japan.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 8/20/1941, p. 6)

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The Star of Hawaii, Volume XXXVI, Number 17, Page 6. August 20, 1941.

Road to hell is paved with gold, 1915.

GIVES UP PLAN TO RESTORE OLD HAWAII TEMPLES

C. R. Forbes Warned from Undertaking by John G. Stokes; Will Put Up Markers

Plans that Charles R. Forbes, superintendent of public works, has had for the restoration of the heiaus on Hawaii will probably be abandoned as a result of a letter received by him recently from John G. Stokes, curator at the Bishop museum.

Mr. Stokes objects to having the heiaus built up again to a semblance of their original shape, as was the plan proposed by Superintendent Forbes, by taking rock that had fallen and resetting it in its old position. Mr. Stokes’ contention is that this would be an unwise thing to do, even in the interest of preserving the old relics. His statement is made after a careful study of them. Continue reading

Hannah Baker in Hilo starting Hawaiian quilting clubs, 1941.

A FINE THING FOR HAWAIIAN MOTHERS

Here in Hilo is Mrs. Hannah Baker now, and she established some Hawaiian Quilting Associations. The first of her Associations was established at the YWCA Building and the second in Keaukaha.

From what was said, there are many who joined these clubs because they were interested in how to quilt Hawaiian blankets, and others perhaps because they wanted to obtain the knowledge of how to cut patterns of all sorts. Continue reading

S. K. Maialoha sent to Kalaupapa, 1905.

LEAVES THE LAND

SEES THE LAND OF SUFFERING AS A STRANGER.

O Swift Messenger of the communities of Hawaii, floating all the way foreign lands, Ke Aloha Aina Newspaper. Greetings:—

On the 12th of this September, in the morning hours, there was crying as people walked outside of the grounds of that hallowed castle, and at 8 o’clock or so was when our belongings were readied. The wailing was heard of women for their husbands, men for their wives, parents for their children, children for their parents, family for family.

And at 11 o’clock, the patients were called to board the car; a veil was spread, and people could no more see us; the cars left the grounds, and great mourning was heard; your writer saw his dear mama and our child for the last time; and the writer heard the calling of my beloved Ape, “O Papa, come back to me.” Continue reading

Jules Tavernier, 1885

[Found under: “NA NU HOU HAWAII”]

Illustrations by Tavernier were sent, a great many of his drawings of the storied places [wahi pana] of Hawaii nei, to the illustrated newspaper Harper’s of New York, with the hopes that they will be engraved in stone and arranged in the newspaper.

[Jules Tavernier not only did these illustrations for Harper’s Magazine, but he did spectacular paintings as well. Click here for the latest post from Nanea Armstrong-Wassel on a painting by Tavernier.]

(Ko Hawaii Paeaina, 3/21/1885, p. 2)

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Ko Hawaii Paeaina, Buke VIII, Helu 12, Aoao 2. Maraki 21, 1885.

Timoteo Haalilio, 1845.

SOME THINGS PERTAINING TO HAALILIO.

Koolau, Oahu, was where he was born; his parents were prominent people. His father died when he was a youth, and thereafter his mother (that being Eseka who is still living) became Governor of Molokai. When he was 8 years old, he joined the family of the King, Kamehameha III, and lived with them. They were at Hilo at this time. When he was 13, Haalilio entered the school of Bingham [Binamu] in Honolulu, and he studied English and…

(Elele, 4/25/1845, p. 13)

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Ka Elele, Buke I, Pepa 2, Aoao 13, Aperila 25, 1845.

Continue reading