Edwin M. Desha fights for Ka Hoku o Hawaii, 1938.

Eddie Desha is Trying All Means to Save “Ka Hoku o Hawaii”

An effort to perpetuate the Hawaiian language and a Newspaper published in that language is being made in Hilo.

Eddie Desha, the nephew of the late Senator Stephen L. Desha Sr., is making this determined effort, with the courage and persistence which characterized his uncle, one of Hawaii’s noted orators and legislators.

Besides a small monthly magazine published by the Hawaiian Board of Missions [Ka Hoaloha], there now remains only one weekly newspaper printed in the native Hawaiian language of Hawaii. It is Ka Hoku o Hawaii (Star of Hawaii), published in Hilo by the Star of Hawaii Publishing Co., Ltd., of which W. H. Beers, Hilo attorney, is president, and Edwin M. Desha is treasurer and manager. Continue reading

Revealing what was lost, 2021.

La Hanau

EDWIN M. DESHA

O Edwin M. Desha, ka  Lunanui o Ka Hoku o Hawaii, ke hoomanao ana i kona la hanau ma keia Poalima iho, Okakoba 18.

Mawaho ae o kona kulana he boki nui no ka Hoku, he kakauolelo o Mr. Desha na Lunahoomalu Samuel M. Spencer of ke Kalana o Hawaii. He lala ku maikai oia no ka hui Liona o Hilo, a pela nohoi me kekahi mau ahahui e ae. Ma kekahi olelo ana ae, he kanaka paa loa oia i ka hana a aole he loaa iaia ka manawa no ka lawe ana i kona hoomaha, a pela nohoi ma kona la hanau.

Me na upu maikai ana no ka la hanau hauoli e Eddie, mai ka papa pa’i holookoa o ka Hoku.

[Did you check out the new “Nūhou Monday” post out from Bishop Museum’s He Aupuni Palapala group? It talks about you can actually see a picture of Edwin M. Desha in the original of this newspaper! Click here to get taken to the page.

P.S. I am amused with the phrase “he boki nui”.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 10/16/1940, p. 1)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 25, Aoao 1. Okakoba 16, 1940.

Looking back to the Hawaiian football champions of 1895, 1926.

WINNERS OF FIRST MAINLAND — ISLAND GRID TILT

Here is the Honolulu team, island champions and victors over the Navy champs from Philadelphia. Top row, standing, left to right—Billie Cornwell, Chris Holt, Louis Singer. Continue reading

Remembering, 1909.

PARADE COMMEMORATED ON MEMORIAL DAY

Because Memorial Day [ka la Lu Pua] fell on this Sunday, therefore the parade was postponed until the following Monday; there were not that many people who went to watch the events of the day.

If this Monday was the actual Memorial Day, then there would have been a lot of spectators; such as by strewing flowers on graves and then return and watch the parade as they marched up for Maemae Cemetery. Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

Death of Sam P. Lohiau of Okoe, 1905.

This made me think back to Kamuela Kumukahi.

nupepa

Great Sorrow!

My favorite Aloha Aina, allow me some space. At 3 o’clock in the afternoon, this past Friday the 26th of May, the breath of my dear Sam P. Lohiau. He was born from the loins of Mr. and Mrs. Kawaa Lohiau, at Okoe, South Kona, and it is the sister of his mother who is writing. He entered Lahainaluna School in the year 1900, and in this coming July he was to graduate from that school.

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What a disappointment, 1867.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Huikau.”]

It will not be seen after all.—We reported in Issue 4 of our Newspaper, “the moon will be eclipsed o n the 13th of September, and it will be seen here in Hawaii.” The Famous School Teacher of Punahou proclaimed to us that the moon will indeed be eclipsed on that day, Continue reading