Donations, 2017 and beyond.

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Aloha all,

I have been asked where donations for this blog should be sent. I am not asking for money. I am just doing this blog on the side when time permits. What would be worthwhile is if you think the posts are worth anything to anyone you know, to pass it on, whether by reposting them electronically on Facebook, Twitter, your own blog, or by email; or printing them and handing them off; or the old-fashioned way, by talking about them.

However, if you indeed want to make donations, please consider making them to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Library and Archives! They hold much of the newspapers that I get my information from. They also are the caretakers of journals and letters and books containing historical information that cannot be found anywhere else. Do not forget to designate that your gift is to go to the Library and Archives.

Mahalo,
http://www.nupepa-hawaii.com

Death of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani, 1917.

Edward K. Lilikalani Left this Life Behind

On the Fourth of last week, Edward K. Lilikalani left this life at sixty-eight years of age at his home on 415 Queen Street, and on this Sunday his body was carried from Williams’ place [mortuary] for the cemetery of Kawaiahao where the last service will be held over his body by the kahu of Kawaiahao, H. H. Parker. Continue reading

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Kalakaua, the firemen’s king! 1875.

Burning of the Ship Emerald.—At half-past two o’clock on Monday morning an alarm of fire was sounded by the watchmen in the bell-tower, which proved to be for the ship Emerald, at anchor in the roadstead. Fire brigades, about two hundred officers and men, were immediately dispatched from the Pensacola in port, which took off two or three of the patent fire extinguishers. The city firemen also turned out promptly, with their machines, hose carts and ladders, ready to assist whenever ordered. At early dawn, the ship was towed into the harbor alongside the steamboat wharf, where the firemen and engines could get access to her. The fire was first discovered soon after midnight, but when the naval force reached the ship the hole was so full of smoke that the fire extinguishers could could not be successfully applied, and little could be done towards checking the fire until the engines could be brought to bear on it. From six oʻclock, the firemen, mariners and citizens worked faithfully till after noon, when the fire was apparently subdued, and the firemen returned home. Continue reading

Response on interview by Jule de Rytiler, 1897.

The ex-Queen has evidently been playing to the gallery and has enlisted in her broken cause some hysterical women. Among these is Julie de Rytiler. This may be a pseudonym, however, for the ever present Julius. He may have changed his sex in print. For mawkish sentiment the interview cannot be beat. When an interviewer writes such stuff as this she insults the lady she is interviewing. The ex-Queen is represented as having read “Aloha Oe” to this double distilled idiot and she writes “I do not know one word of Hawaiian, and yet so feelingly and expressively did this lovely woman read these songs that I felt sure I understoods it all.” It reminds one of the old lady in one of Marryat’s novels, who spoke of the extreme comfort of that “Blessed word Mesopotamia” was to her. The interviewer must be the kind of woman that can get a great deal of comfort out of “Mesopotamia,” or “Aloha Oe.” Hysterical persons like this do harm to the person they wish to do good to and certainly take away from the dignity of the ex-Queen.

(Hawaiian Star, 3/31/1897, p. 4)

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The Hawaiian Star, Volume III, Number 1235, Page 4. March 31, 1897.

On the 100th anniversary of the passing of Queen Liliuokalani, 1917-2017.

[Found under: “LILIUOKALANI. A Published Interview With Her.”]

The Hawaiians are my people, and I am still their Queen. To the Hawaiians I shall always be Queen while I am alive, and after I am dead I shall still be their Queen—their dead Queen. But Hawaii is not in the hands of its people. From other countries all kinds of people have come—some wise, some foolish, some good, some very mean. They found fortunes in my county under the protection of my fathers, and then they robbed me of my throne.

[This quote is taken from an interview by Jule de Rytiler originally published in the American Woman’s Home Journal. For the entire interview as published by the Independent, see here.]

(Independent, 4/1/1897, p. 4)

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The Independent, Volume IV, Number 547, Page 4. April 1, 1897.

 

Hawaii State Archives collection of Queen Liliuokalani photographs now online, 2017.

Queen Liliuokalani Photograph Exhibition

In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of Queen Liliʻuokalani, Hawai‘i’s last reigning monarch, the Hawaiʻi State Archives is pleased to announce the digital release of the Queen Liliʻuokalani Photograph Exhibition.

[Go check it out here!]

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Hawaii State Archives, Photograph Collection, PP-98-13-019