Maori newspaper, 1875.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Te Wananga.–This is the title of a New Zealand newspaper of sixteen pages which we obtained. The words within are of New Zealand [Maori] with some paragraphs in English. Taking a look, it was joyful to see firsthand that the New Zealand language is very similar to our language, the Hawaiians.

(Kuokoa, 10/23/1875, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIV, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 23, 1875.

Hawaiian woman returns from Europe after many years away, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Hawaiian Woman in Europe.–Early morning on this past Thursday, Kahula (woman) returned from Germany, on the foreign Laura & Louise. She lived many years away from her home lands; she left perhaps in 1857. She said she went to America, Britain, Germany, and her life was comfortable, living with her employers, that being L. H. Anthon, Esq. (Luika), that foreign language speaking haole who lived in Hawaii before.

(Kuokoa, 10/25/1862, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Okatoba 25, 1862.

News from 160 years ago, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

From Okasi.–This past Tuesday, the whaler Othello came to port, and that is the very first ship from Okhotsk [Okasi], and it was from it that the news about ships in that area. Fine were the things heard about the ships in that sea. There are many whales [kohola] there and there are no great storms. All the barrels on this ship were full, and on the 23rd of September it left that place. The ships this season are very blessed, and that is a good thing, for us all.

(Kuokoa,10/25/1862, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Okatoba 25, 1862.

Joseph Puni writes to the father of Diamond Kekona, 1916.

LETTER FROM BRITAIN.

Opera House,
Dudley, England,
Nov. 4, 1916.

To my true friend, Dick Kekona,

Aloha oe:–Perhaps you are surprised receiving this letter. I have tried all means to release your beloved son Diamond from the British armed forces. I appeared before the American Consul in the countryside here in England, telling them that Diamond is an American. They responded that they will put my request before the head consul in London. On the 17th of September, I went to the Consulate in London, they told me that the consul could not order the British government to release Diamond because he is 25 years old; only those below 20 years old, if they are American citizens. These past days, I decided to have your daughter-in-law (Amy Kekona) to come to see me, and get together with her to think of a way to release her husband; for these good reasons, I ask that you send me his birth certificate, or to go to the governor of Hawaii to write to the Hawaiian Delegate Mr. J. K. Kalanianaole in Washington D. C., to go to the State Department in Washington and have the American Ambassador in London investigate the circumstances of his enlisting in the armed forces, and you verify that your first-born son is a true Hawaiian. He had a document in the city of Paris, France, from the office of the American General, written on the 13th of February, 1914, attesting to the fact that he is a Hawaiian. If he finds these documents, he will be victorious. Do not neglect this, for I am still regretful not having his acting. He has much knowledge in this area, and his showing this to the world would bring fame to the Hawaiian Lahui. I will organize everything here and send it to London. With our sleuthing, I believe everything will progress; may God watch over and keep safe the life of your child until we meet again, amen.

With aloha to your family and the Hawaiian Nation.

JOSEPH PUNI.

Write me at your daughter-in-law’s, c/o 143 Baxter Ave., Kidderminister, England.

(Aloha Aina, 1/19/1917, p. 3)

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 3, Aoao 3. Ianuari 19, 1917.

Too much news today, 1880.

Knowledge Seeking Youths.

We received letters from the youths who traveled in search of knowledge. They are in the city of Cincinnati, State of Ohio, on the past 9th to the 16th of September. They tell of how their travels are going well, the beauty of everything, and their joy and that they are full of hope. We want to tell everything in full pertaining to these Hawaiian youths, but our paper is full, therefore wait for another when we receive letters from them again.

[These youths are Robert Wilcox, James Booth, and William Boyd.]

(Elele Poakolu, 10/6/1880, p. 5)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke I, Helu 5, Aoao 5. Okatoba 6, 1880.

Death of Waikohu, 1854.

A SUDDEN DEATH!!

On the 13th of September, a man named Waikohu died, at Maemae, Honolulu, Oahu; he died suddenly and intestate. This is why he died: he went to plant banana shoots on the sides of the taro loʻi, he fell in the taro patch, and someone saw him in the loʻi and saw that he was dead; his face and mouth were covered with mud from the loʻi, and men came and fetched him and carried him to the house.

O All you reading this in the Elele Hawaii newspaper, let us consider the consequences of this death. Our life is but vapor, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away, so says the Holy Scripture.

Aloha to you all. S. Kanakaole,
Kawaiahao, Sep. 14, 1854.

(Elele Hawaii, 10/1/1854, p. 59)

Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 9, Pepa 15, Aoao 59. Okatoba 1, 1854.

Honolulu, aka Na Lani Ehiku, 1886.

[Found under: “Kela me Keia.”]

We hear that the name of a new daily appearing today is Honolulu. It has four pages and sixteen columns. Another name we hear for it is Na Lani Ehiku.

[Have you seen any issue of this newspaper?]

(Kuokoa, 10/16/1886, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXV, Helu 42, Aoao 3. Okatoba 16, 1886.

Kamehameha V’s Cabinet, 1872.

The True Ministers.—It pleased his Majesty on the 10th of September, to appoint those below as ministers of his nation:

Ferdinand W. Hutchison, Minister of Interior.
Stephen H. Phillips, Attorney General.
Robert Sterling, Minister of Finance.

The positions of Foreign Affairs and War are unfilled. But for now, their duties are given to His Ex. F. W. Hutchison to perform until the positions are filled.

(Kuokoa, 9/14/1872, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XI, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 14, 1872.

On the new Lahainaluna buildings, 1905.

Pertaining to Lahainaluna.

The school these days is not of that stature of days past, in its functions, and the condition of the dorms, and where they are to be taught.

The school this day, [something here seems to be missing], like something the former principal [Alatau Tamchiboulac Atkinson] stated in his speech on the day the opening of the buildings, “Lahainaluna school is the college for the poor.”

Those words are true, and it is still so today.

These are beautiful buildings, and the rooms are supplied with beds and pillows; the children are to supply a pillowcase, and sheets, and a blanket to sleep with; they have no need to worry about a mosquito net, for each room is furnished with metal mosquito screening, and the lights are electric.

The school begins on Monday, the 4th of September, 1905, and it is desired that the students arrive earlier than that, and if some come late, they will be left without a room.

So too with the new students, arrive before the beginning of school to receive a room. Students from 14 years old and up are wanted.

The Principal,
C. A. McDonald.
Lahainaluna School, July 28, 1905.

(Kuokoa, 8/11/1905, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 32, Aoao 5. Augate 11, 1905.