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Aloha kakou,

People continue to ask where donations for this blog should be sent. The answer still remains the same. What would be worthwhile is that if you think these posts are worth anything to anyone you know, to pass them on, whether by reposting them electronically on Facebook, Twitter, your own blog, or by email; or by printing them out and handing them off; or the old-fashioned way, by talking about them.

However, if you indeed want to make donations, please consider making them to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Library and Archives! They care for much of the newspapers from which I get my information. They also are the caretakers of journals and letters and books containing historical information that cannot be found anywhere else. Do not forget to designate that your gift is to go to the Library and Archives.

Me ka oiaio no,

www.nupepa-hawaii.com

The Queen’s Protest. 1893.

KUKALA KUE A KE ALIIAIMOKU.

“O wau, Liliuokalani, ma ka lokomaikai o ke Akua, malalo o ke Kumukanawai o ke Aupuni Hawaii, Moiwahine, ma keia ke hoike paa nei i Ko’u kue i kekahi hana a mau hana paha a pau i lawelawe ia e kue ana Ia’u iho a me ke Aupuni Kumukanawai o ke Aupuni Hawaii e kekahi poe e koi ana ua kukulu lakou he Aupuni Kuikawa no ka manawa no keia Aupuni.

“Ke ae wale nei no Au mamuli o ka mana oi ikaika o Amerika Huipuia nona hoi ke Kuhina Elele Nui, ka Meamahaloia John L. Stevens, ua kauoha aku i na koa o Amerika Huipuia e hoopae ia mai ma Honolulu, a ua kukala ae e kokua no oia i ua Aupuni Kuikawa ’la no ka Manawa i oleloia.

“Nolaila, i mea e kaupale aku ai i na hookuia ana o na puali i hoolawa ia me na lako kaua, a malia paha o hoopoino ia ke ola; nolaila, malalo o keia Kuahaua Kue a i kauhola ia hoi e ua mana ikaika ’la, ke ae wale nei no Au e panee aku i Ko’u Mana a hiki i ka manawa a ke Aupuni o Amerika Huipuia, mamuli o na mea oiaio e waiho ia aku ai imua ona, e hoololi ai i na hana a kona Luna Aupuni a e hoonoho hou Ia’u maluna o ka mana A’u e koi nei ma ke ano Aliiaimoku o ka Paeaina Hawaii.”

“Hanaia ma Honolulu, i keia la 17 o Ianuari, M. H. 1893.”

“[Kakauinoaia:]

LILIUOKALANI, R.

Samuel Parker,
Kuhina o ko na Aina E.

Wm. H. Cornwell,
Kuhina Waiwai.

Jno. F. Colburn,
Kuhina Kalaiaina.

A. P. Peterson,
Loio Kuhina.

“Ia S. B. Dole a me kekahi poe e ae o ke Aupuni Kuikawa no ka Manawa o ka Paeaina Hawaii.”

[I Liliuokalani, by the grace of God and under the constitution of the Hawaiian Kingdom, Queen, do hereby solemnly protest against any and all acts done against myself and the constitutional Government of the Hawaiian Kingdom by certain persons claiming to have established a provisional government of and for this Kingdom.

That I yield to the superior force of the United States of America, whose minister plenipotentiary, His Excellency John L. Stevens, has caused United States troops to be landed at Honolulu and declared that he would support the said provisional government.

Now, to avoid any collision of armed forces and perhaps the loss of life, I do, under this protest, and impelled by said force, yield my authority until such time as the Government of the United States shall, upon the facts being presented to it, undo the actions of its representatives and reinstate me in the authority which I claim as the constitutional sovereign of the Hawaiian Islands.

Done at Honolulu this 17th day of January, A. D. 1893.

Liliuokalani, R.

Samuel Parker,
Minister of Foreign Affairs.

William H. Cornwell,
Minister of Finance.

John F. Colburn,
Minister of the Interior.

A. P. Peterson,
Attorney-General.

To S. B. Dole and some others of the Provisional Government of the Hawaiian Islands.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/18/1893, p. 2)

HawaiiHolomua_1_18_1893_2.png

Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 141, Aoao 2. Ianuari 18, 1893.

 

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Protest, 1893.

SOVEREIGNTY GIVEN.

Because of the support of the American Minister for the provisional government to exist, Queen Liliuokalani relinquished her nation, with a statement protesting these actions. At this time she await the voice of redress and justice from the nations of Great Power of this world. God will lead us until we attain peace.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/19/1893, p. 2)

LOKL_1_19_1893_2.png

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 625, Aoao 2. Ianuari 19, 1893.

“Annexation movement is practically unanimous,” 1893.

TO SPEAK FOR SPEEDY ANNEXATION.

William Brewster Oleson of Hawaii Talks of the Situation at Home.

William Brewster Oleson, principal of the Kamehameha (Hawaii) Manual Training School, was in the city yesterday on business. He left Honolulu four weeks ago to transact private business. Before returning he will go to Washington to do what he can to create a sentiment among Congressmen in favor of annexation. Continue reading

Aloha Aina, 1893.

THE SCHOOLS OF SAINT LOUIS AND KAMEHAMEHA.

We reported that the students of Saint Louis School were forbidden from wearing annexation ribbons upon their chests. That is patriotism. And we also reported that the students of Kamehameha School were ordered to wear annexation ribbons at the urging of the teacher. How lamentable for the Hawaiian youths that are pushed in to giving up their land of birth.

(Hawaii Holomua, 4/13/1893, p. 2)

HawaiiHolomua_4_13_1893_2.png

Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 200, Aoao 2. Aperila 13, 1893.

Steadfast behind the Lahui, 1896.

LISTEN, O PUA O HAWAII¹.

As a spokesperson for the people, and being that we are all angered by the contemptuous words of the people who stole our beloved land; we continue to protest these acts to this day; therefore, we speak on something we saw which is stealing once again; and that is this:

October 24, Bulletin Newspaper²; the newspaper stated:—Professor Berger of the Government Band [Bana Aupuni] has put a request before all the members of the National Band [Bana Lahui Hawaii] for the boys to agree to give time to teach his musicians to sing; time to sing will be made between the first and second parts and so forth.

And being the boys of the National Band will join with the “Peacock government [aupuni Pikake]³” Band, it shows those on the outside that the two sides have joined together and the disagreements have become as naught.

That is the gist of this report which we saw; and those rights of yours, O Hawaii, will be stolen once again.

Continue reading

Names not to be forgotten, 1893.

THE NATURE OF THE HAWAIIAN FLAG.

The Hawaiian Flag is one of the most glorious Flags, and it is so pleasant to look upon, and like the nature of the Flag, so too the People.

The brown-skinned [ili ulaula] Hawaiian Lahui are a kind People, are modest, treasure malihini, are welcoming, have open hearts, and so forth.

But even if the Hawaiian Flag and her People are kindhearted, they have been trampled upon by the descendants of the missionaries, and are being paid back with poisonous words, even more so than the Auhuhu.¹

It is being said that they are a Lahui that is stupid, know nothing, pagan, idol worshiper, and on and on.

That is what we the Hawaiian People get in return.

But despite all of their abuse, we are not full of hate at the actions of these missionary descendants.

The people who tried to grab our beloved land; and their names shall not be forgotten by this Lahui.

They being: Albert Francis Judd [Alapaki F. Kauka]; William Richards Castle [W. R. Kakela]; Lorrin Andrews Thurston [L. A. Kakina]; Amos Francis Cooke [F. Kuke]; William Brewster Oleson [W. B. Olesona]; Henry Martyn Whitney [H. M. Wini]; Dr. Charles M. Hyde [Kauka Hai]; Sereno Edwards Bishop [Kahunapule Bihopa], who was raised by a Hawaiian woman at Kona, Hawaii; Sanford Ballard Dole [S. B. Dole]; William Owen Smith [W. O. Smith]; the Emerson brothers [na hoahanau Emekona]; William W. Hall [Wile Holo]; and some others.

All of them is who brought down our Flag, by lowering it and raising the American flag in its place.

However, under God’s benevolence, our flag has been returned to its rightful place.

So therefore, O Hawaiian People, we are prepared to lay out before you the full list of names of these great transgressors.

¹Auhuhu is a plant that was used in fishing as a fish poison.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 10/13/1893, p. 2)

KE KULANA O KA HAE HAWAII.