Donations, 2017 and beyond.

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Aloha all,

I have been asked where donations for this blog should be sent. I am not asking for money. I am just doing this blog on the side when time permits. What would be worthwhile is if you think the posts are worth anything to anyone you know, to pass it on, whether by reposting them electronically on Facebook, Twitter, your own blog, or by email; or printing them and handing them off; or the old-fashioned way, by talking about them.

However, if you indeed want to make donations, please consider making them to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Library and Archives! They hold much of the newspapers that I get my information from. They also are the caretakers of journals and letters and books containing historical information that cannot be found anywhere else. Do not forget to designate that your gift is to go to the Library and Archives.

Mahalo,
http://www.nupepa-hawaii.com

On sacred stones, 1921.

THE STONE FISH GODDESS “MALEI” TO BE RETURNED TO MAKAPUU

Hawaiians have not forgotten the story about the stone goddess called “Malei,” a stone deity cared for and worshiped by the Hawaiian fishermen in the olden days; the great fish that the stone deity always brought to shore was the uhu, as is seen in the story of Hiiaka:

“Aia la o ka uku kai o Makapuu,
He i’a ia na Malei na ka wahine e noho ana i ka ulu a ka makani,
I Koolau ke ola i ka huaka’i malihini,
Kanaenae a Hiiaka i ka poli o Pele,
E Malei e, i halekipa ke aloha, e uwe mai!’

[There are the uhu of Makapuu which swim in procession,
Fish of Malei that dwells in the rising winds,
In Koolau lies the sustenance for the unfamiliar travellers,
Hiiakaikapoliopele prays,
O Malei, welcome us in love; let us weep!]

Continue reading

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Aloha is a reciprocal thing, 1779, 1867 and beyond.

[From: S. M. Kamakau’s “Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I: Ke Au ia Kalaniopuu A. D. 1779. No ka Make ana o Kapena Kuke, Oia Hoi o Lono.”]

Kalaniopuu treated Captain Cook generously, and gave him pigs, taro, sweet potato, bananas, and other things; he also gave him ahuula capes, mahiole, kahili, feather lei, fine wooden bowls, various fine kapa, ahu ao mats from Puna, and garments of hinalo—Captain Cook gave Kalaniopuu some rubbish—(It is said that the hat that Captain Cook gave to Kalaniopuu is in the head of the kaai of Keaweikekahialiiokamoku.)

(Kuokoa, 2/2/1867, p. 1)

Kuokoa_2_2_1867_1.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 5, Aoao 1. Feberuari 2, 1867.

Hooulu lahui, 1872.

[Found under: “NA OLELO HOOLAHA.”]

TO HAWAIIAN PARENTS.

IN ORDER to encourage Hawaiian parents to take good care of their children, and to assist in the growing of the people of this Archipelago, I do certify that I will pay

A PRIZE OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS

to each and every child born in Waikapu, Maui, after this day. These are the conditions of this Agreement. It is a child born in Waikapu proper, Continue reading

“E mau ka maluhia o nei Pae Aina,” 1872.

[Found under: “NA OLELO HOOLAHA.”]

Hawaiian National Anthem.—THIS MELE composed by the Hon. Mrs. Lilia K. Dominis has come in; there are many copies of this famous mele from San Francisco, and it can be had for the low price of a quarter, at the Book Shop of H. M. Whitney [H. M. Wini].

(Kuokoa, 12/14/1872, p. 3)

Kuokoa_12_14_1872_3.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XI, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 14, 1872.

The grand celebration of the 64th birthday of Princess Ruta Keelikolani Keanolani Kanahoahoa Muolaulani Keikiheleloa Keanohalia Kaleonahenahe Kohalikolani at her newly completed Keoua Hale, 1882.

Birthday of Her Royal Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.

Her Royal Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani celebrated, on Thursday last, her sixty-fourth birthday by a luau, or banquet in native Hawaiian fashion, given at H. R. H.’s new mansion in Emma-street, followed on the evening of Friday by a Reception and Ball. The occasion was indeed adopted for the “house-warming” the handsome and beautifully decorated house being only just ready for occupation. The event has been long talked of, and looked forward to, and has been the chief topic of conversation during the past week, almost to the exclusion of all others, causing the exciting events of the previous week to fall quite into the background.

The Mansion which was the scene of these festivities is situated on the land known as Kaakopua, which has a long frontage to the Ewa side of Emma-Street. It is a handsome structure of two main stories, on a high basement with an attic story and turret above. On the main floor on the mauka side of the house, are two drawing rooms which communicate with one another by a wide arch. Continue reading

Anapuni, land of John Papa Ii, to be sold, 1879.

GUARDIAN’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE.

HAVING BEEN DULY LICENSED BY Hon. L. McCully, Justice of the Supreme Court, to sell the Real Estate hereinafter described, the property of my ward, Miss Irene H. Ii, a minor; Continue reading