Donations, 2018 and beyond.

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Aloha kakou,

People continue to ask where donations for this blog should be sent. The answer still remains the same. What would be worthwhile is that if you think these posts are of value, to pass them on, whether by reposting them electronically on Facebook, or Twitter, or your own blog, or by email; or by printing them out and handing them off; or the old-fashioned way, by talking about them.

However, if you really want to make a donation, please consider making one to the Library & Archives at the Bishop Museum! They care for much of the newspapers from which I draw my information. They also are the caretakers of journals and letters and books and oh so many photographs containing historical information that cannot be found anywhere else. Remember to specify that your donation is to go to the Library & Archives.

Me ka oiaio no,

www.nupepa-hawaii.com

Mourning for Mataio Kekuanaoa, 1868.

Mataio Kekuanaoa passes on a hundred a fifty years ago.

nupepa

The Kawaiahao Choir:—We heard that tonight, this choir will go to the grounds of Iolani Palace [not the one standing today], where they will mourn for Kaimihaku who silently passed on:

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Young Hawaiians’ Institute established, 1894.

The Institute.

The entertainment at the Y. M. C. A. Hall last night was a great success. The Young Hawaiians Institute is a most deserving organization. The concert with which the boys inaugurated their club was greatly appreciated and proved the abilities of the members of the new society, and their friends. The following is the list of the officers: Continue reading

The Young Hawaiians’ Institute, Hui Hoonaauao Hawaii Opio, 1896.

The Agenda of the Young Hawaiians’ Institute for 1896.

Through the kindness of the Hui Hoonaauao Hawaii Opio of this town, the Editor of this paper has acquired the Agenda of that Institute for this year forth, it being topics being read monthly (except for September) by those who were given the subject. It begins this like this:

February—Old Hawaiian History.
Solomon Meheula.

March—The Origin of the Hawaiian Archipelago.
J. M. Poepoe.

April—The Profession of Kahuna.
J. K. Kaulia.

May—The Crusades.
J. N. K. Keola.

June—The Profession of Farmer.
S. M. Kanakanui.

July—The Profession of Fisherman.
M. K. Nakuina.

October—The Origins of the Hawaiians.
J. M. Poepoe.

November—The State of the Native Hawaiians of Today.
Charles Wilcox.

December—The Old Religion of the Hawaiians.
S. M. Kanakanui.

Following the reading of the topics, the members of the Institute will consider the true value within the topics. The Committee that organized this Agenda is, S. M. Kanakanui, Chairman [Lunahoomalu]; J. K. Kaulia, J. N. K. Keola, M. K. Nakuina, Charles Wilcox.

(Kuokoa, 1/10/1896, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXV, Helu 2, Aoao 3. Ianuari 10, 1896.
Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXV, Helu 2, Aoao 3. Ianuari 10, 1896.

Mary Kawena Pukui’s ʻŌlelo Noʻeau back in print! 2018.

I just saw in the Bishop Museum online newsletter the following announcement!

‘Ōlelo No‘eau Available For Preorder

We’re thrilled to share with you that one of our most beloved titles, Mary Kawena Pukui’s ʻŌlelo Noʻeau: Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings, has been reprinted in partnership with the Dolores Furtado Martin Foundation—and preorders are available NOW online at Bishop Museum Press!

Museum members can utilize their membership discount on the Press website by entering the promo code MEMBER20 prior to checkout.

Copies will be available for pickup and/or purchase in Shop Pacifica starting Monday, December 10, 2018.

Learn More

Timoteo Haalilio in the words of William Richards, 1845.

Haalilio was born in 1808, at Koolau, Oahu. His parents were of respectable rank, and much esteemed. His father died while he was quite young, and his widowed mother subsequently married the Governor of Molokai, an island dependent on the Governor of Maui. After his death, she retained the authority of the island, and acted as Governess for the period of some fifteen years. Continue reading

The return of the aloha aina, 1845.

The Montreal, from Boston, arrived off our harbor on Sunday last, at day break.—Her ensign was noticed to be half-mast, and various conjectures began to circulate through the town, when William Richards, Esq., H.H.M.’s Commissioner to the U. States and Europe, whose arrival has been so long and anxiously awaited, landed and proceeded directly to the palace, where he immediately made known to their Majesties the melancholy news of the death of his fellow Commissioner, Mr. T. Haalilio, who died at sea on the 3d Dec. ult. Continue reading