Young’s Fish Market beginnings, 1951.

KALUA PIG every Saturday

Fresh Laulaus—every day

Poi—Fresh Fish—Chinese & Hawaiian Continue reading

Does anyone have more information on this photographer? 1866.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

New Pictures.—With the return of J. Valentine, the haole photographer who sailed to Kauai some months ago, he has printed some of his pictures which he showed as lantern slides [kana mau kii i hoolele aku ai]. Continue reading

O ku, o ka, o ku, o ka… 1908.

[Found under: “Ka Moolelo Kaao o Hiiaka-i-ka-Poli-o-Pele”]

Then Hiiaka replied, “If you really want to go with the two of us, you can take your young pig. There is but a short distance before you reach the crater. The crater is right there upland. You will find us in no time.”

“It is a tribute, like an uku, a fish from Kahoolawe,” replied Wahineomao, continuing on, “But there is one problem. Maybe when I get back, I will not find the two of you.”

“No. You will find us,” answered Hiiaka. “And when you are making the climb, say o ku o ka, o ku o ka, and keep doing that until you reach the crater. Continue reading

Plea for explanations of Hawaiian terms, 1899.

HAWAIIAN WORDS

Under this heading [Huaolelo Hawaii], desired are native words of all sorts, and also the descriptions of those words, but send them to the Office of “Ka Loea Kalaiaina” in Honolulu. Being that amongst the Learned Nations of this world, cared for by them are numerous Books explaining their Language [Olelo Kumu], and Thus this effort is asking of the intimates and friends living all over the Archipelago, Continue reading

On the state of the Hawaiian Language, 1920.

101 years ago…

nupepa

PERTAINING TO THE HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE.

Mr. Editor of the Nupepa Kuokoa, Aloha oe:—In the Kuokoa of Friday, May 21, 1920, I saw your thoughts supporting Mr. Coelho on the Hawaiian Language, and about the lack of use of the Hawaiian language in some churches and Hawaiian organizations when they meet; English is what is spoken in meetings; not because Hawaiian is not understood, but because of their great embarrassment in speaking Hawaiian; there is English and it is attractive to speak, yet all the while they understand that it is not appropriate at all to be speaking in English.

It isn’t in some churches and Hawaiian associations that it is not spoken, but in markets, on streets, in homes in which true Hawaiians live, and all around this island of Oahu, only a very tiny fraction of true Hawaiians speak the Hawaiian language; most of the men, women, and children…

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