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Aloha all,

I have been asked where donations for this blog should be sent. I am not asking for money. I am just doing this blog on the side when time permits. What would be worthwhile is if you think the posts are worth anything to anyone you know, to pass it on, whether by reposting them electronically on Facebook, Twitter, your own blog, or by email; or printing them and handing them off; or the old-fashioned way, by talking about them.

However, if you indeed want to make donations, please consider making them to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Library and Archives! They hold much of the newspapers that I get my information from. They also are the caretakers of journals and letters and books containing historical information that cannot be found anywhere else. Do not forget to designate that your gift is to go to the Library and Archives.

Mahalo,
http://www.nupepa-hawaii.com

A mele composed by Mary Jane Montano for the fourth anniversary of the Outdoor Circle, 1916.

HONOLULU, OUR FAIRY LAND

A feature of yesterday’s birthday luncheon of the Outdoor Circle was the reading of a Hawaiian poem, written by Mrs. Mary Jane Kulani F. Montana [Montano], author of the verses of “The Old Plantation,” and dedicated to the Circle. The original verses and an English translation were read by Mrs. Webb. These were:

HONOLULU AINA KUPUA.

I.

I ka puu wau o Manoa,
I ka wai ola a Kanaloa,
E kilohi i ka nani punono
O Honolulu Aina Kupua.
Ua nani mai ka uka a ke kai
He mele aloha i ana ka puuwai,
Me he ala e i mai ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua.

II.

Ua kini a lau na pua,
Kumoana la i kanahele,
Kanahele ohai pua ala,
I kanu ia e na lima aulii.
Aloha i ke oho o ka niu,
I ka holu nape i ke ehu kai,
Me he ala e i aku ana,
Honolulu Aina Kupua. Continue reading

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A name song for Lawrence M. Judd by Mary Padigan, 1929.

Chant For Judd Will Be Feature Of Inauguration

Original Tribute In Music Sings Praises of Next Governor

A feature of the musical program to be given at the reception on the day of the inauguration of Lawrence M. Judd as governor of Hawaii will be the singing of a chant composed in Judd’s honor by Mrs. Mary Padigan.

The chant will be sung in Hawaiian by the Johanna Wilcox singing girls. The English of the chant was written by Miss Johanna N. Wilcox, assisted by David Kalauokalani, George P. Mossman, Charles K. Notley, Eben P. Low, William E. Miles and Simeon Akaka. The Hawaiian and English versions follow:

HE INOA NO KAUKA

Kaulana mai nei oe e Kauka
Keiki hanau o ka aina.

Na ke kalaunu o Hawaii nei
Hapai ae a kau i ka hano.

Hanohano o Kauka e ku nei
Ika pane poo o ke aupuni.

Ua like a like me kauwila
Kaanapu i ka maka o ka Opua.

A he pua nani oe no ka aina
A ka lehulehu ae lei mau ai. Continue reading

Liliu’s National Anthem reaches New York, after a fashion, 1875.

Their National Hymn.

The words and music of the Hawaiian national anthem are both the composition of Mrs. Lila K. Dominis, the sister of King Kalakaua. The first part of the hymn we transcribe for the edification of our readers:

HE MELE LAHIU HAWAII.

Ka Makua Mana Loa,
Malin wai ia wakou,
E haliu aku rei.
We wa hian haahan,
E wan ka waluhia
O rei Pae Alna,
Wal Hawaiia Nuhan,
Mololo o Kou Malu. Continue reading

Graduation at Honokaa, 1941.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU HAMAKUA AME KOHALA”]

Honokaa: Last week in the evening of Tuesday, in the hall of Honokaa High School, the graduation ceremony was held for the children who numbered 46, from the 12th grade of the High School of Honokaa. The girls wore white, and the boys wore white pants, black coats, and blue shirts; large bouquets of gardenias were in their hair of the girls, and for the boys, in the collar of their coats. The parents and friends of these children were welcomed by the ushers with paper programs showing the schedule of events of that evening.

At half past seven, the instruments of the Glee Club of the School sounded, at which point the boys and girls marched in pairs into the hall led by their Principal Herman Lasgaard and Mr. Abraham Poepoe. After all the children took their seats, and after everyone was quiet, Mr. Poepoe prayed thanking God for this great assembly and asking God to bless each of the children graduating from the school and to bless them with jobs that will benefit their lives and their parents, and in their areas.

The decoration above this place was beautiful, with flowers and the words “ALOHA” CLASS 1941, with akulikuli flower fashioned on ti leaves. The hall was also filled with parents and friends, totaling some 500 or more perhaps.


On Tuesday at half past one, 81 children graduated from the ninth grade of that school. The hall was filled once again with parents and friends. Seen were gifts of flowers and other presents brought by the parents and friends for their children to give them joy for their graduating from this grade of the school.

Some of the Hawaiian children who properly graduated from the 12th grade of the High School were Daisey Lindsey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Lindsey of Kamuela; Betty Herrman, daughter of Mrs. Camella Hermann of Haina; Henry Keomalu Jr., son of Mr. Henry Keomalu, teacher at Kaapahu School, and residing at Kalopa.


At 11 o’clock on this past Friday, the electric bell of Honokaa School sounded, telling the teachers and the all of the children of the school that the time for school was over, and that it was vacation. That song was sung, “What ALOHA Means.” And the children were dismissed to go home. A number of teachers got in their cars and went to Hilo to get there before the plane for Honolulu left. They went off to San Francisco to attend as Representatives to the Great Teacher Conference of America. Some teachers remained at home to vacation.

[Congratulations to all the keiki graduating this year (and their families) in Hamakua and across the archipelago! Be safe out there.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/11/1941, p. 1)

HokuoHawaii_6_11_1941_1.png

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVI, Number 7, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1941.

 

 

Mother’s Day in Lahaina, 1941.

[Found under: “Na Hunahuna Mea Hou O Maui”]

A celebration of Mother’s Day [La o na Makuahine] was held at Wainee Church last Sunday with singing of some beautiful songs by the choir and Rev. L. B. Kaumeheiwa said some words pertaining to “MAKUAHINE.”

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/14/1941, p. 1)

HokuoHawaii_5_14_1941_1.png

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVI, Number 3, Aoao 1. Mei 14, 1941.