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E na makamaka heluhelu,

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Me ka oiaio no,

nupepa-hawaii.com

News of Kapoina Dandridge heading back to Hawaii, 1900.

FORTUNE

For Colored Woman.

Will Go to Sandwich Islands.

Disappearance of a Barberton Man. [unrelated story]

(Special Correspondence.)

Barberton, Oct. 5.—Mrs. Smith Dandridge, an estimable colored lady, who formerly resided here, until a year ago, and also in Akron, has gone to the Sandwich Islands to obtain a fortune, which has been willed to her. Continue reading

Francis Hyde Ii Brown (lengthy) political ad, 1926.

Francis H. Ii Brown

(Ii of Kahalelaukoa)

A Republican

SENATORIAL

Candidate

Give Your Ballot for Him

“A True Descendant of Yours, O Hawaii”

Make Him Your Servant

IT IS RIGHT TO SUPPORT HIM AND TO ELECT FRANCIS II BROWN AND THAT HE BECOME A SENATOR FOR THE ISLAND OF OAHU.

The great question that the voter will give his thought to before giving his support and vote, that is understanding and knowing first what is right; and when knowing what is right, then the support and votes will be gotten, but if it is known and understood that it is not right, then the person running for a position will lack support and votes. This is a long-standing lesson and it is something that is well fixed, something that one cannot avoid; some people have reasons why they give their support to some candidates running for some positions, while the thoughts of some voters wander about looking to arrive at a place of all the truths, and who is most appropriate to give their support and vote to so that they are voted into the various posts they are after. Continue reading

Passing of Margaret Kapoina Dandridge, 1926.

Following an illness, Mrs. Maggie Kapoina Dandridge, the mother of Mrs. J. K. Mokumaia, grew weary of this life in the morning of this past Tuesday at the age of 77.

(Kuokoa, 10/28/1926, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXV, Helu 43, Aoao 5. Okatoba 28, 1926.

Death of a different George Makalena, 1878.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Death of G. C. McLean.—This past Tuesday, Keoki Makalena [George McLean], a haole very familiar to there people here in Honolulu, died; and he was the one who owns the Shop called, “Ka Halekuai Bolabola.”*

[Oftentimes foreign people were given Hawaiianized names like Makalena for McLean, Wilikina for Wilson, or Poe for Boyd. I have started tracking some of these names, because I think it would be helpful when doing research in Hawaiian language documents. See the list by clicking here.]

*George Christie McLean was also known to Hawaiians as Bolabola. His store seems to have been known in English as George C. McLean’s Store.

(Kuokoa, 12/14/1878, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVII, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 14, 1878.

George Makalena and others with the Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show want to come home, 1899.

Hawaiian Rough Riders

Four of the Hawaiians who were with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show are at San Francisco rooming in a big building opposite the Occidental on Montgomery. The boys, who hope to get off for home by Manoa, are: K. Nakea, Hoapili, Kipi and Makalena. Continue reading

John Kulia Mokumaia holds party for Buffalo Bill’s sister, 1928.

POI LUNCHEON GIVEN—J. K. Mokumaia was host recently at a poi luncheon at his home in Moanalua in honor of Mrs. Julia Cody Goodman, sister of the late Col. William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill). Front row, seated, Mrs. Walter Goodman, Mrs. Abbie M. Andrus of Los Angeles, and Mrs. Samuel R. Damon. Middle row, seated, Mrs. Goodman and Mrs. Lahilahi Webb. Back row, George Makalina [George Makalena], J. K. Mokumaia, Walter Goodman and Samuel R. Damon.—Bert G. Covell photo.

(Star-Bulletin, 8/4/1928, p. 10)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXXVI, Number 11415, Page 10. August 4, 1928.

Julia Cody Goodman, sister of Buffalo Bill, arrives, 1928.

BUFFALO BILL’S SISTER TO BE HONORED HERE

Honoring Mrs. Julia Cody Goodman, sister of the late William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill), a program of Hawaiian dances, songs and ceremonies, is being given this afternoon at the home of W. F. Goodman, 2680 Kaaipu Ave., a son of Mrs. Goodman.

Mrs. Goodman arrived in Honolulu last Saturday for a visit with her son. She is 85 but still active.

The program for today was arranged by J. K. Mokumaia, foreman of the capitol building force, who was a member of the famous Buffalo Bill show during a mainland tour in 1898. There were seven Hawaiians in the company at that time, of whom two survive.

(Star-Bulletin, 6/22/1928, p. 1)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXXV, Number 11,378, Page 1. June 22, 1928.

Return of Margaret Kapoina (Maggnett) Dandridge after more than 40 years! 1901.

BACK TO HAWAII NEI AFTER OVER FORTY YEARS ABSENCE

MR. AND MRS. DANDRIDGE.

FOURTY YEARS away from Hawaii and now returned, is the story of Mrs. Dandridge given below:

Mr. and Mrs. Dandridge arrived in Honolulu on the Sierra two weeks ago. Mrs. Dandridge is a Hawaiian and forty years ago, when about twelve years of age, she was taken to the States by Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Lewers, her parents being dead at the time. Her native name is Kapoina. Continue reading

Educator Mrs. Clara M. Mokumaia retires, 1940.

Mrs. Mokumaia Will Retire After 35 Years as Teacher

By MAY DAY LO

Mrs. Clara M. Mokumaia, principal of Kaloaloa school, was busy checking upon details for a Boy Scouts’ party when we found her for an interview. The sandwiches were being made, cookies were baked and 10 gallons of punch had been ordered. She had put some flowers in the school auditorium to spruce it up a bit for the party.

She had had a busy school day but she was going to return in the evening to make sure that her Boy Scouts had a good time.

“I’m strong for Boy Scout work,” she explained. “Some people object to the Scouts using the school buildings because they might damage them a little but I would rather have better boys than beautiful buildings. It is more than important to have a boy’s life clean and fit.” Continue reading