Plant a tree! 1910 / 2016.

KA LA KANU LAAU!

This is the day to plant trees as proclaimed by the Governor last week. On this day, the school teachers across the Territory will take the trees set aside for their schools and plant them in designated places.

On this morning Dr. Hobdy will speak before the students of Punahou College at Pauahi Hall pertaining to this effort. During this time, Mrs. L. Moses will speak before the female students in Bishop Hall pertaining to caring for ones health. The new school will also follow on the same path, that being the College of Hawaii.

[Click here for the Arbor Day Hawaiʻi website to see what is going on in celebration of Lā Kanu Lāʻau this year!]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 11/11/1910, p. 1)

KHR_11_11_1910_1.png

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke VIII, Helu 45, Aoao 1. Novemaba 11, 1910.

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Long live the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum! 1892.

A Visit to the Museum.

President Hosmer and the boarders of Oahu College paid a visit to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum at the Kamehameha School last Saturday afternoon. Prof. W. T. Brigham, curator, showed the collegians almost every article on exhibit at the museum, and his visitors were very much impressed with the relics of the barbaric age of Hawaii nei, only one hundred years ago. Mr. Brigham knows the history of almost everything placed in the museum, and he entertained the students for over two hours with the pedigree of the various exhibits.

[I wonder if the students of Punahou are still visiting the museum today!]

(Advertiser, 10/17/1892, p. 3)

PCA_10_17_1892_3

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVI, Number 3203, Page 3. October 17, 1892.

The importance of mele, 1860.

Pertaining to Mele!

O PEOPLE THAT KNOW FINE MELE AND the old Mele, I want you all to send those Mele in, and some will be published in the Hae [Ka Hae Hawaii]; and some will be kept; for those things are valuable. The Philomathian Society [?? Ahahui ma na mea naauao]  at Punahou is wanting old Mele to put into their archives to be looked at at a later date. S. C. Armstrong [S. C. Limaikaika].

Editor of the Hae.

(Hae Hawaii, 3/21/1860, p. 203)

No na Mele

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 4, Ano Hou.—Helu 51, Aoao 203. Maraki 21, 1860.

Kamehameha vs Punahou, 1919.

THIS IS A PICTURE OF THE FOOTBALL GAME BETWEEN THE BOYS OF KAMEHAMEHA AND PUNAHOU ON THIS PAST SATURDAY; IT WAS ONE OF THE MOST INTENSE GAMES SEEN; THE BOYS OF PUNAHOU RAN OFF WITH THE WIN FOR THEIR SIDE, AND THE CHAMPIONSHIP FOR THAT SPORT WENT TO PUNAHOU THIS YEAR.

(Kuokoa, 11/21/1919, p. 1)

O KE KII KEIA...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 47, Aoao 1. Novemaba 21, 1919.

Swim to be held at Punahou, 1922.

A Scene from Preparations for a Swim at Punahou

The picture above [below], beginning from the left is of Duke P. Kahanamoku, the world champion swimmer, Mrs. David Wark Griffith, Oscar Henning, the manager of Kahanamoku, and Dad Center. Mr. Kahanamoku entered into a contract for him to perform some astonishing feats to be made into a movie under the direction of Mr. Henning for the success of that endeavor, and it is believed that a company will be started here to produce Kahanamoku’s movies.

(Kuokoa, 2/10/1922, p. 5)

He Hiona no ka Hoolalaia Ana o Kahi Auau ma Punahou

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 6, Aoao 5. Feberuari 10, 1922.

Schools in Hawaii nei, 1844.

[Found under: “KA AHAOLELO MISIONARI.”]

II. The Schools. Lahainaluna College: there were 135 students enrolled in the school just recently. Six of them are studying the apostles of God with Dibela [Dibble]. In April, 30 students graduated, four died, three went home because of illness, and three were expelled for rule violations; that leaves 97 remaining at the school.

They are being taught by three teachers, Dibble, Emesona [Emerson], and Alekanedero [Alexander], in penmanship, in music, math, geography, algebra, surveying, theology, philosophy, composition, and speech. Some study in English, others study in the word of God.

College at Wailuku. The teachers at the school are Bele me kana wahine [Mr. and Mrs. Bailey] and Mi. Okana [Miss Ogden]; there are 47 students living there and eight are married. At the school is taught reading, penmanship, geography, math, philosophy, theology, spirituality and actual work.

Boarding School at Hilo. Laimana laua me kana wahine [Lyman and his wife] are the teachers. There are sixty students at the school; 37 of them have become members in the church. The instruction is like that of the Colleges at Wailuku and Lahainaluna; however they are not progressing far in the difficult subjects like at Lahainaluna.

Girls’ School at Hilo. Koanawahine [Mrs. Coan] is the teacher; most of the food is donated by the church members in Hilo. There are 26 students; there of them are married to husbands, 21 of them have joined the church.

Boarding School of the Alii. Kuke laua me kana wahine [Cooke and his wife] are the teachers. They are instructed only in the English language. The government sponsors this school, and supplies all necessities. It is doing well currently: the students are obedient and are progressing in their knowledge.

Missionary School at Punahou. Dola [Dole] and Kamika wahine [Mrs. Smith] and Rise laua me kana wahine [Rice and wife] are the teachers. There are 24 students at the school. This school is solely for the American missionaries.

Select Schools. There is one in Waioli under Ioane [Johnson]. There are 63 students. It is not a boarding school. The students put effort into working, and it is from this that they get their supplies, and the church members give assistance as well.

In Hilo is another select school. There are 70 students, and Wilikoke [Wilcox] is the teacher. But he might have gone to Waialua to live.

In Kohala is another. Bona [Bond] is the teacher; there are 12 students; there is schooling for teachers there also.

There is a select school at Hana. Rice was the teacher, but he has returned to Punahou now. There were recently 30 students.

Small Schools. In these Islands there are 330 schools; 270 teachers; 12,762 students; 4,000 children can read, 2,100 can write; 5,800 can do math; 1,850 know geography.

[The state of the schools in Hawaii nei was part of what was discussed at a missionary conference held in 1844. This description starts with “II.” because i left the first part of the discussion out which was “I. Pertaining to the Church“.
It would be very helpful if there was online a “comprehensive” list of all variant names for people, like these for many of the missionaries which was published in the Elele Hawaii in 1848.]

(Nonanona, 7/9/1844, pp. 35–36.)

II. Na Kula.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 35. Iulai 9, 1844.

Ma Hilo...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 36. Iulai 9, 1844.

Opening of Punahou School, 1842.

THE SCHOOL AT KA PUNAHOU.

On the 11th of this July, this school began; there were 5 boarders and 12 day schoolers. Its work is currently progressing well.

On the 12th of July, Emerson folks left for Lahainaluna to live.

(Nonanona, 7/19/1842, p. 16)

KE KULA MA KA PUNAHOU.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 4, Aoao 16. Iulai 19, 1842.