54 years after their arrival, the old gannenmono are taken for a joyride, 1922.

The Newest and the Oldest

The three old gannenmono go on a joyride in a Cadillac in 1922.

There was coverage in this column last week about Dr. Eijiro Nishijima purchasing the newest 1922 model four-passenger Cadillac (Phaeton) from the American Hawaiian Motors Company, but there is a story about the group of Hawaii’s oldest [Japanese] men sightseeing within the city in this newest car. That is, last Wednesday, the three old men, [Sentaro] Ishii, [Yonekichi] Sakuma, and [Katsusaburo] Yoshida were invited to the Youth Association’s Thursday  luncheon, and on their way home, in front of the Nishijima Clinic on Kukui Street, through the introduction of an accompanying reporter of this paper, Mrs. Nishijima thought it would be nice to give the old men a ride, and with their pleasure, Shuichi Hirano of the aforementioned car company who was present personally took the wheel, and drove the three old men straight down Beritania Avenue. The car was great, the road was great, and Manoa Valley, beautiful. Continue reading

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Experiment of Japanese laborers, 1868.

NOTES OF THE WEEK.

Arrival of Japanese Emigrants.—The British ship Scioto, Captain Reagan, arrived yesterday, 33 days from Yokohama, Japan, with the first instalment of Japanese laborers, selected and shipped to the Hawaiian Government by its Consul Mr. Van Reed. These laborers are in charge of Dr. D. J. Lee and Mr. A. D. Baum, who have taken special care to preserve the health of the passengers, and they have arrived in excellent condition. Continue reading

More news about the gannenmono, 1868.

The Yaconin [Yakunin].—The Board of Immigration have placed Saburo [Tomisaburo Makino], (the Japanese official who came with the laborers in the Scioto), at school at Punahou. It was a condition imposed by the Tycoon [? shogun], in the permission given to our Consul, Mr. Van Reed, to send the Japanese to these Islands, that a Yaconin should accompany them, and remain until the expiration of their contracts. Saburo, therefore, while clothed by his own Government with a responsibility to look after his countrymen, during their voyage hither, and residence here, now that the laborers are distributed to their various places for work, and the call for his services in the management is infrequent, desires to improve his time in the study of the language and the books of the foreigners among whom his lot is cast for three years. We shall have in Saburo an opportunity to send back to Japan an educated man, acquainted with our ways, customs and country, and hereafter to be of service, we hope, in our father relations with Japan. Continue reading

Japanese laborers, 1868.

Japanese.—Dispatches from Consul Van Reed inform us, that he has engaged and will ship for Honolulu 180 picked Japanese for laborers. Their contracts are for three years are $4.00 per month, found and medical attendance, to be taken to Honolulu and returned at end of contract, free of expense. Continue reading