Thomas Square inauguration, 1887.

Inauguration Concert at Thomas Square

Thomas Square has at last been successfully inaugurated as a public square by the Hawaiian band giving one of its entertainments to a large audience on Thursday evening last. This plot of ground, about seven acres, was donated by the Hawaiian Government as a public square some fifteen years ago, and was named Thomas Square in honor of Admiral Thomas of the British navy, who, in a kindly manner, undid the act of taking possession of these Islands by Lord George Paulet, the British Government endorsing the former and censuring the latter. Shortly after the square was enclosed and trees planted, which was about all that was done until late years, when the Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, who takes a lively interest in such matters, Continue reading

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Shark fin, sea cucumber and tree ear trade, 1864.

Sea Cucumber [Loli];—Tree Ear [Pepeiaolaau]—and Shark Fin [Lala Mano.]—In today’s newspaper, there is printed an Advertisement by Akuwai, one of the Chinese merchants of Honolulu nei, calling for all people to bring in Loli, Pepeiaolaau, and Lala Mano, to their Shop on Nuuanu Street, makai sdie of the store of A. S. Cleghorn [Ake], and right in front of the Hawaiian hotel, that being Haleola. Therefore O Friends near the sea, you should all go and bring in Sea Cucumber, Tree Ear, and Shark Fin, so that you get rich off of the money of Akuwai and company. Be quick! Be quick, lest you be too late.

(Kuokoa, 4/23/1864, p. 2)

Kuokoa_4_23_1864_2

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 17, Aoao 2. Aperila 23, 1864.

Hauoli La Hanau, e Kaleiohawaii! 1877.

Held with much celebration was the birthday of the Princess Victoria Kaiulani Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaleiohawaii, the first-born daughter of Her Highness the Alii the Princess Miriam Likelike and Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, on her second birthday, on this past October 16th, at Waikiki Kai, by way of the holding of a banquet laden with much food.

This day was greatly honored by the arrival of the Alii, the King, and by the great attendance of the Officers from foreign nations, the Captains of the warships, the domestic Officers, and the prominent ones of Honolulu nei. Also present was the band of the King, which entertained folks with their songs.

(Kuokoa, 10/20/1877, p. 2)

Ua malamaia ma ke ano hoomanao mahuahua loa...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVI, Helu 42, Aoao 2. Okatoba 20, 1877.

Marriage of Maud Knudsen and Herbert Garstin, 1892.

[Found under: “NU HOU HAWAII.”]

On the evening of the 5th of this December, in the Episcopalian Church [St. Andrew’s Cathedral] at Honolulu, joined in marriage by the Rev. A. Mackintosh were Mr. Herbert Garstin and Miss Maud Knudsen, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Valdemar Knudsen of Kauai. The Alii, the Queen graced this marriage gathering, accompanied by the Governor and the Chamberlain, and a lady-in-waiting. On the next steamship to California, the couple will return to California, the place they wish to make their home, where they will spend their future days.

(Kuokoa, 12/10/1892, p. 3)

I ke ahiahi o ka la 5...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXI, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 10, 1892.

Princess Kaiulani returns home, 1897.

PRINCESS KAIULANI.

This past Tuesday, the 10th of Nov., with the arrival of the steamship Australia, the “Princess” Kaiulani, and her birth father [luaui makuakane], Hon. A. S. Cleghorn returned. Her attire carried the “alii” colors of Hawaii nei, that being the yellow of mamo feathers and the red [“pai-ula”] of the oo. Upon her head was a lei of carnation “poni-moi” [coronation]. She was in fine health, and has the stature of a well-educated lady.

Before the ship docked, the wharf was filled with people of all of the different lahui among us; the most however were Hawaiians. And when the ship came of to the dock, she was clearly seen, and some sobbed at her sight. This was not the body of Kaiulani eight years ago, but this was Kaiulani at twenty years old. When she left the shores of her land of birth, she was bight a child [“kama”] of 10 or 12 years of age, and she looked very much like the picture below:

THE YOUNG PRINCESS.

Her features and Her demeanor in the days of Her youth.

But upon this return, she is a woman that is a full-grown adult, and invested upon her are all the qualities of an adult. Among the words she gave to the people who met with her aboard the ship, she expressed her joy in stepping once again on the sands of her birth. She stood on the ship for almost a half an hour being detained by the many friends who hugged her. “Aloha—aloha to the alii,” are the words from the mouths of the kanaka maoli. Thereafter, she stepped of of the ship, accompanied by her birth father, along with Miss Eva Parker and the “Prince” David Kawananakoa, and she stepped into the car. While the car headed up from the dock, the sides of the street were filled with spectators who gave their aloha to her, and the “young Alii” nodded to each one on both sides of the road at the places which expressed their aloha.

She left for her home in Waikiki.

TIMES TO SEE THE YOUNG ALII.

The young “Alii” Kaiulani is at her residence in Ainahau, Waikiki. She will have audience with the Hawaiians on Saturdays from 10 in the morning until 4 in the afternoon; and the others on each day at the hours set aside. On this Wednesday, she went into the uplands to the Crypt of the “Alii” up in Nuuanu.

THE PRINCESS KAIULANI

This Picture is taken from a lime-light picture [? kii hoolele aka] taken of her in London, a few months ago.

[It is good to be wary of the loyalties of the newspaper (just as it is today) when reading coverage of events. The Kuokoa seems to be at this time pro-annexation and anti-monarchy. This is reflected in their use of quotation marks around words like “Princess” and “Alii”.]

(Kuokoa, 11/12/1897, p. 1)

KE KAMALIIWAHINE KAIULANI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVI, Helu 46, Aoao 1. Novemaba 12, 1897.

More on the birth of Princess Kaiulani, 1875.

Letters of Congratulation.

At Lahaina, on the 21st inst., on the news being received from Honolulu of the birth of a daughter to the Princess Likelike Cleghorn, the citizens held or public meeting at the Court House, presided over by Gov. Kapena, and adopted the draft of letters of congratulation to His Majesty, and to the parents of the young Princess. The following is a translation of the address to His Majesty:

“To His Majesty Kalakaua, Sire: Permit us in the name of the people of Lahaina to present our sincere congratulations on the birth of a new Princess. The birth of a new scion of the ancient family of Chiefs of which Your Majesty is the head, affords new cause for rejoicing among Your people. Our prayer is that Heaven may shower its choicest blessings on the infant Princess, that she may be granted a long liife, and become an honor and a blessing to the Royal Family of Hawaii nei.”

Signed by the Committee.

J. M. Kapena, Chairman,  G. W. Napaepae,
A. Pali,  J. O. Kawela,
D. Kahaulelio,  D. Mamaki.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/30/1875, p. 2)

LETTERS OF CONGRATULATION.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XX, Number 18, Page 2. October 30, 1875.

The birth of the new princess, Kaiulani, 1875.

On Saturday morning last, the 16th instant, Her Royal Highness the Princess Miriam Likelike, sister to His Majesty the King, and wife of the Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, was safely delivered of a daughter. At four P. M. all the bells of the city rang a merry peal in honor of the infant Princess.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/23/1875, p. 2)

On Saturday morning last...

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XX, Number 17, Page 2. October 23, 1875.