New clothes at Afong and Achuck’s, 1869.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

New Chinese Clothes.—Afong [Afona] and Achuck [Akaka], Chinese merchants of this town, Continue reading

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Fish prices regulated, 1918.

PRICES FOR FISHES ARE SET BY THE FOOD COMMISSIONER, CHILD.

This past Saturday, the rules of the food commissioner of Hawaii nei, Child, went into effect, in that the prices for different fishes will be set, not like before when fish was so expensive that some people could not afford fish for them and their families. Continue reading

Shark fin, sea cucumber and tree ear trade, 1864.

Sea Cucumber [Loli];—Tree Ear [Pepeiaolaau]—and Shark Fin [Lala Mano.]—In today’s newspaper, there is printed an Advertisement by Akuwai, one of the Chinese merchants of Honolulu nei, calling for all people to bring in Loli, Pepeiaolaau, and Lala Mano, to their Shop on Nuuanu Street, makai sdie of the store of A. S. Cleghorn [Ake], and right in front of the Hawaiian hotel, that being Haleola. Therefore O Friends near the sea, you should all go and bring in Sea Cucumber, Tree Ear, and Shark Fin, so that you get rich off of the money of Akuwai and company. Be quick! Be quick, lest you be too late.

(Kuokoa, 4/23/1864, p. 2)

Kuokoa_4_23_1864_2

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 17, Aoao 2. Aperila 23, 1864.

Death of Capt. Alexander Adams, 1871.

The death of Kapena A. Adamu.—On this past Friday, Oct. 27, here in the town of Honolulu, Captain Alexander Adams [Alekanadero Adamu] died at 91 years and 10 month of age on this earth. He was born in Scotland in 1780, and he died on the sands of Kakuhihewa [Oahu]. He first came to Hawaii nei in the year 1810. Not long after, he was soon under the employment of Kamehameha the great. He was the Captain who sailed the double-masted ship Kamehameha to China with a cargo of sandalwood [iliahi], and that wood from Hawaii was heavily taxed. That was the first haole and pilot who entered the port of Kou [Honolulu]. He lived in Hawaii for 61 years becoming a local.

(Kuokoa, 11/4/1871, p. 2)

Ka make ana o Kapena A. Adamu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke X, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Novemaba 4, 1871.

Fish market prices, 1943.

Prices Set

The Office of Price Administration [Mahele Kau Kumukuai] set the top price of fishes for the island of Hawaii, and it is seen here below:

Some fish prices rose a little, and some decreased.

Mahimahi, Ono and Ulua rose from 55 to 60 cents. (This is per pound.)

Kalekale went from 55 to 65 cents.

Opihi went from 30 to 40 cents.

Awa, fillet, from 45 to 50 cents.

Ulua over 20 pounds, from 55 to 45 cents.

Aku fillet, ocean anae, papiopio, whole ulua under 20 pounds, 55 cents per pound.

Ahi fillet, and moi from 55 to 50 cents.

A’u fillet, kalekale, moano, opakapaka, u-u, from 55 to 45 cents.

Aholehole, from 50 to 45 cents.

Whole aku, kupipi from 40 to 35 cents.

Opelu from 45 to 35 cents.

Humuhumu from 35 to 25 cents.

Pond anae, from 60 to 55 cents.

Kole from 40 to 18 cents. Palani, Pualu, from 35 cents to 18 cents. Akule from 50 cents to 35 cents.

We see that the price of some fish are indeed low while some are higher. We have no criticisms about some, and over some we will just keep our mouths shut, for that is under their control.

Know you fishermen the prices shown above, so that you know the prices of all the different fishes, lest you go beyond it and end up without profit.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/22/1943, p. 1)

Kau Ia Maila Ke Kumukuai

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVIII, Number 22, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 22, 1943.

Bags to ship sugar to be woven of lauhala or akaakai? 1873.

Wanted.

Here is something that is much sought after by the producers of sugar. Bags that are woven with strips [ko-ana] of bulrush [akaakai] or lauahala perhaps, to put brown sugar [ko-paa eleele] in and ship to Australia or America. The previous week, a schooner brought 15,000 bags of this type from New Zealand, and the haole traders greatly appreciated them. The length of the bags are 33 inches, and 17 inches wide. If bags like these are woven here at a reasonable price, and a thousand are made, they will be sold out in a year. Continue reading