Death of Kumuhonua, 1865.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Died at the sugar mill.—An announced was made to us by John Kapuahewa of Waioli, Kauai, about the death of Kumuhonua at the sugar mill, on the 25th of May.

(Kuokoa, 6/8/1865, p. 2)

Kuokoa_6_8_1865_2

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 23, Aoao 2. Iune 8, 1865.

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Record-setting sugarcane, 1903.

Tallest Sugarcane in the World.

Located in the Sugarcane Plantation of Ewa, Island of Oahu, there was found a tall cane understood to be the single tallest sugarcane from all around the world. This was cane was found in the cane field. Continue reading

The latest from Hilo, 1898.

THE NEWS FROM NORTH HILO.

Mr. Editor of the Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian People:

Aloha oe:—Please include this bit of news from here in North Hilo.

On the first of this month, Pakele, Iaukea, Laika, Kalei, and Lahapa went to go pick opihi on the shore of Waipunalei, and upon their return, they climbed up the pali. Lahapa was the first to climb up and the rest followed. When they reached the midpoint up the pali, a rocked dislodged and hit Lapaha square on the chest and he rolled down the pali, and because of the love of God, he was caught on a pandanus tree that was burned earlier in a fire. It was 40 feet high from where he tumbled from to where he was caught. Therefore, O my sisters and brothers and younger siblings, don’t go pick opihi again and return upland of the pali, lest you end up dying. Continue reading

Lai Toodle? 1878.

From Kawaiulailiahi.—In a letter from S. D. W. Kawaiulailiahi of Kanahena we saw that a Chinese laborer of the Captain Makee & Co. was beaten by a supervisor [luna hana], and when he decided to go to bring charges before the Judge of the Honuaula district, he was found by the boss [haku hana], and was beaten again. He will also complain about how the luna of that sugar plantation make them work.

(Kuokoa, 10/26/1878, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 26, 1878.

The latest from Kohala, 1879.

News of the Apaapaa Winds.

To My Constant Desire, Ka Nupepa Kuokoa.

Aloha oe:—On this past 11th of Oct., fire engulfed more or less 15 acres of Robert R. Hind’s.

This is the cause. The fire jumped from the property of J. W. Keohokii, Esq., while he and his workers were burning the leaves of the sugarcane.

And it was extinguished because of all of those assisting. The luckiest thing was that the cane was all ready to be milled.

While the smoke was billowing, the Fly Wheels of the two Mills spun, that being Haui Mill [Hawi Mill] and Union Mill,  hoping to quickly take care of that burning cane. Because of the terribly wild winds that day, it was not put out quickly.

On that very day of the fire, a Handwritten Newspaper at Kaiopihi under the editing of Joseph Poepoe was issued.

The name of that paper is “Hoku o ke Kai.” When we examined it, the discussions were outstanding.

On the past 16th of this month, at 6 o’clock in the evening, the sugar plantation people of the district of Kohala, from Niulii to Kaauhuhu, met at the Court House. And this is what happened at that meeting.

The officers were chosen first. J. Wight, President; Dr. Thompson, Vice President; H. B. Montgomery, Secretary; D. S. Kahookano, Hawaiian Secretary; Charles Hapkins [Charles Hopkins], Translator.

After this, Henry Johnson explained the purpose of this meeting.

1. Pertaining to the laborers. 2. Pertaining to the wages of the laborers. 3. The work hours per day. This was left to a committee.

D. R. Vida, Esq., asked that a Committee be selected to  form a constitution, laws, and rules; the motion was passed.

H. Johnson, Esq. put forth the name of this organization, that being “Hui imi pono a hooholomua o ka poe mahiko a Wili o Kohala” [Association seeking rights and progress for the workers of the plantations and Mills of Kohala].

The meeting was adjourned until the 30th of Oct. to hear the report of the Committee.

Yesterday afternoon, Oct. 17, a brick fell between the Boilers of the Mill of R. R. Hind, Esq., but there were no serious injuries.

Those were a few news items from here in the Back areas.

Charlse N. Pulaa.

Honomakua, Kohala, Oct. 18, 1879.

(Kuokoa, 10/25/1879, p. 3)

Na Anoai o Ke Apaapaa.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVIII, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Okatoba 25, 1879.