George J. Fern starts a poi business, 1917.

Mr. George J. Fern

HAS OPENED

a Poi Shop at the Market. Go and see him and His Delicious Poi. Liliha and Kukui.

(Puuhonua o na Hawaii, 5/25/1917, p. 3)

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Ka Puuhonua o na Hawaii, Buke IV, Helu 21, Aoao 3. Mei 25, 1917.

Advertisements

A Hawaiian Co-Op, 1918.

KA “HUI LOKAHI O NA HAWAII” KAUPALENAIA.

These passing day, Hawaiians like Mayor Joseph J. Fern, David Kalauokalani, Samuel C. Dwight, James L. Holt, Hon. William P. Jarrett, Hon. C. P. Iaukea and a number of other Hawaiians are joining together to establish a company that will deal in the sale of poi, beef, salmon, dried fish, and so forth; with the intent to help Hawaiians in all ways that will lessen their household expenses; because it is very clear these days that because the poi factory of Kalihi is not making poi now, the current poi manufacturers are greatly raising the price of poi to five cents per pound; this is a price not seen in the past ten years or more; so too with the price of beef; the Chinese are buying very fine beef from the company of C. J. Waller [Wala], but the Chinese are charging Hawaiians 35 cents per p0und; it is an exorbitant price which has never been seen before; and it is heard from the talk of the Chinese that they will raise the price of poi once again to 6 cents a pound; it was this that encouraged the Hawaiians to establish a company that could hold back the severe increasing of the prices of our foods, O Hawaiians, by the Chinese.

The establishing of a company amongst Hawaiians is important and crucial; but if we Hawaiians do not implement an endeavor that will help ourselves, there will  be no one else who will help us.

If we turn back and look at the history of Hawaii nei, we will see that the dissension amongst us Hawaiians was what wrenched away small businesses from us Hawaiians as well as all the other endeavors. Continue reading

Hasn’t the time come that Hawaiians try to help in the economic endeavors of their own people? 1914.

Announcement

KA HUI KUAI POI O KALIHI (“KALIHI TARO AND LAND CO., LTD.”)

To those who read this.

With aloha:—Whereas all of the shares of the Company named above has been acquired by W. C. Achi and some Hawaiians, and being that they are the only Hawaiians carrying out the growing of taro and the selling of poi, the food of our kupuna and makua; therefore, they humbly ask you, O Hawaiians, that you give them your assistance, by you buying your poi from their group.

The production of the poi at their poi factory is truly sanitary, and your orders will be filled with great haste.

Hasn’t the time come that Hawaiians try to help in the economic endeavors of their own people? Continue reading

Kalihi Poi Factory advertisement, 1916.

TASTY POI!

Orders for poi from all over the Territory will be filled. The cost is reasonable and the production is hygienic. Isn’t it right that Hawaiians should assist in the efforts of Hawaiians?

Send in your Orders.

KALIHI POI FACTORY

Telephone Number 1586

HONOLULU, T. H.  11-2716

(Aloha Aina, 4/15/1916, p. 4)

AlohaAina_4_15_1916_4

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXI, Helu 27, Aoao 4. Aperila 15, 1916.

Mrs. Akioka passes away, 1928.

A LOVING SENTIMENT FOR OUR MAMA, MRS. AKIOKA

Mr. Editor of Ka Hoku o Hawaii:

Aloha oe—

Please allow to include this sad parcel in some space in your newspaper to be published this week, in the issue of this new year. Our beloved mother left us, her children and family to grieve for her.

She was born in Canton, China, in 1857, in the month of April 23, and left her homeland when she was thirty-two years old and came to the Hawaiian Islands. She lived patiently with her husband in the beautiful valley of Waipio working under a poi company for several years. After this, her husband started his very own poi company. His capital was a single mule, some leased land, and a hired hand.

He did well for five years, and at that point, the two of them grew until the other poi companies dropped off. Today, it is one of the big poi factories of this beautiful valley supplying on the average 8,000 pounds of poi every week, feeding the workers of the ranches of Hawaii nei. Her husband (our father) died three years ago.

We are her children

Ernest Akioka

Edward Akioka

Herbert Akioka

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/17/1928, p. 3)

HE MANAO ALOHA NO KO MAKOU MAMA MRS AKIOKA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXI, Helu 33, Aoao 3. Ianuari 17, 1928.

Mr. Akioka, a Chinese taro farmer/poi maker, dies, 1922.

AKIOKA PASSES AWAY.

MR. AKIOKA (CHINESE)

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha kaua:—Please kindly allow me an open space of your newspaper, for our loved one, our father has left us, his children and his wife; he has peacefully left for that realm we must all go to.

He had a swelling sickness, and the doctor was fetched, but he did not get any relief and died.

Our father was born in the “land of flowers,” China, on the 30th of November, 1851, and he left us on the 18th of May, 1922; he was over 71 years old. Continue reading