S. K. Maialoha sent to Kalaupapa, 1905.

LEAVES THE LAND

SEES THE LAND OF SUFFERING AS A STRANGER.

O Swift Messenger of the communities of Hawaii, floating all the way foreign lands, Ke Aloha Aina Newspaper. Greetings:—

On the 12th of this September, in the morning hours, there was crying as people walked outside of the grounds of that hallowed castle, and at 8 o’clock or so was when our belongings were readied. The wailing was heard of women for their husbands, men for their wives, parents for their children, children for their parents, family for family.

And at 11 o’clock, the patients were called to board the car; a veil was spread, and people could no more see us; the cars left the grounds, and great mourning was heard; your writer saw his dear mama and our child for the last time; and the writer heard the calling of my beloved Ape, “O Papa, come back to me.” Continue reading

Leprosy patients wanting to be reexamined, 1909.

NOW 171 LEPERS KNOCKING AT THE DOOR OF HOPE

There are 171 inmates of the Leper Settlement who desire reexamination to decide whether they are now afflicted with the disease.

They will be examined at Kalaupapa by Dr. W. J. Goodhue, the resident physician, and Dr. J. T. Wayson, a member of the Board of Health. These doctors are the people’s own choice.

How it came that there are 171 wishing to avail themselves of the chance to be discharged comes about this way: When President E. A. Mott-Smith of the Board of Health was writing directions to Superintendent J. D. McVeigh regarding the examination of the nineteen named in Senator Harvey’s resolution and six or eight others who became applicants later, it occurred to him to have the superintendent ascertain if there were any other wanting to undergo the tests. The result is the list of 171 including the nineteen whose reexamination the Legislature ordered.

As reported in this paper last week, the applicants then on the list, having been asked to name the physicians they wished to examine them, all but five chose Dr. Goodhue. The five wanted Dr. O’Day, but on account of departure he was unavoidable. Another choice was offered the whole number, when Drs. Goodhue and Wayson were elected.

It was originally intended to bring the applicants to Honolulu for examination at the Kalihi receiving station, but this was found impracticable owing to the lack of accommodation. Dr. Wayson will go to Molokai at an appointed time to conduct the examination with Dr. Goodhue.

(Hawaiian Star, 8/24/1909, p. 1)

HawaiianStar_8_24_1909_1.png

The Hawaiian Star, Volume XVII, Number 5426, Page 1. August 24, 1909.

Partial list of those to be released from Kalaupapa? 1909.

LIST OF NAMES OF THE LEPROSY PATIENTS.

To the Editor of the Messenger of the Lahui, the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha no: Please allow some me some space in your delicate body, and it will be you that takes it about, so that the many friends may see that these are the parents, children, elders, grandchildren and the great grandchildren, returning back home. Perhaps not all named will leave this grave, perhaps but a fraction.

The writer was told that there were 108 names but all that was given him were 55 names, leaving 53 names. These are their names and the name of their doctor:

Continue reading

Building for movies and entertainment to be built in Kalaupapa, 1915.

ANNOUNCEMENT

Because of the benevolence of the Board of Health [Papa Ola], by them taking up the building of a Movie and Entertainment House for the Patient Colony [Kahua Ma’i] here, we therefore revoke our Requests put out by us to the Fundraising Committees which were approved by us. As for the Committees that collected money for this endeavor, please send it to the Secretary of the Committee, Mr. Joseph Aiona, or to the Superintendent [Lunanui] of this Patient Colony, Mr. J. D. McVeigh.

By way of the Committee, the people of the Patient Colony send their boundless thanks to the Fundraising Committees [Komite Ohi Dala] for this work, and to all those who gave their donation. May God bless us all in the Name of Jesus, Amen.  JOSEPH AIONA,

Secretary.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/30/1915, p. 3)

OLELO HOOLAHA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 10, Helu 30, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 30, 1915.

John Shorland Wilmington retires as postmaster of Kalaupapa, 1925.

THAT HAWAIIAN LEFT HIS POST FLAWLESSLY

This past May, John Shorland Wilmington turned in his resignation, requesting in that letter to leave the position as Postmaster of Kalaupapa, Molokai, on the 30th of June 1925.

The resignation was accepted with much regret, and Mrs. Augusta Nascimento was selected and Postmaster in his place, but because the new Postmaster was not prepared to immediately assume the position, Mr. Wilmington continued at that position until the 30th of September 1925, whereupon everything was given into the hands of the new Postmaster, and Mr. Wilmington put aside the Postmaster position which he held for 25 years and 4 months.

Wilmington was chosen as Postmaster for Kalaupapa, Molokai on the 1st of June 1900, and on the 1st of June 1925, he held the position of Postmaster of Kalaupapa for 25 years.

The Post Office of Kalaupapa was constantly rated “Excellent,” the highest rating attainable for a Postmaster for his good, accurate, and respectable carrying out of his work.

During the past great war, while War Stamps were being sold, Kalaupapa was the only Post Office in the Union that was allowed to purchase War Stamps on Credit; all of the other Post Offices were to send in the money first and then receive the Stamps; this showed that Mr. Wilmington had the full trust of his supervisors in the Department.

In the month of July 1916, Wilmington was losing his sight, but he continued at his job until he formally left the position.

KALAUPAPA

(Hoku o Hawaii, 11/10/1925, p. 2)

WAIHO IA OIWI HAWAII I KA OIHANA ME KA MAEMAE

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Novemaba 10, 1925.

John Kaalouahi dies at Kalaupapa,1924.

REV. JOHN KAALOUAHI HAS GONE.

He was born at Koae, Puna, Hawaii, in March 1858. He died at Kalaupapa, Molokai, on the morning of Wednesday of last week, Aug. 13, 1924.

He was 66 years old when he left behind this life.

He served as reverend for Halawa, Molokai for 30 or more years, and it was this sickness of body that took him away from his church, and he resided at Kalihi Hospital for one year and then was taken to Kalaupapa. He spent 6 months at Baldwin Home in Kalaupapa, and he passed away. He leaves behind 8 children who grieve for him, 2 boys and 6 girls, along with grandchildren. Five are here in Honolulu, two on Molokai, and one in Hilo, Hawaii.

With grief,

SAM KAALOUAHI.

(Kuokoa, 9/4/1924, p. 6)

REV. JOHN KAALOUAHI, UA HALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 36, Aoao 6. Sepatemaba 4, 1924.