Getting kalo grown in Waipio to the market, 1920.

[Found under: “KELA AME KEIA”]

The farmers in Waipio are putting in the effort to grow their huli, but the problem of these people who are patiently planting kalo Continue reading

On huli and planting and the ebook coming out from Bishop Museum Press, 1857/2020.

[Found under: “NO KA MAHIAI.”]

Not all kinds of huli are suitable for planting in wet patches. If the corm has been too closely cut off from the bottom of the huli and the huli itself is too small, it is not good for planting. If the taro has rotted and only a third remains good, Continue reading

Kalo planting and an ebook from Bishop Museum Press, 1922/2020.

[Found under: “KE ANO O KE KALAIAINA.”]

On  making loʻi if it was not done previously. I learned to make wet patches for four years at Lahainaluna. If it was desirable to convert a piece of dry land into a wet patch, they looked to see how water could be brought to it, because water was important. . . . If the patch was 20 fathoms long and 10 fathoms [anana, arm span] wide, we made them with shovels and the few pickaxes that we had. The soil near the banks was tossed up on them. The banks were made well, they were solid and thick. In digging with the shovel from the upper to the lower end and from one side to the other there was no part of the patch that was not dug. It looked level and even. Then the water was run into it and then the uneven places were seen, some deep, some high. The deep places were filled in. When it was seen that it was level then water was allowed to run in. We brought the oxen, that pulled the carts over the plains, and put them into the newly made patch and the oxen trampled on the earth up and down, to-and-fro. If we wanted some fun like the oxen, we increased the water in which to play. . . . Continue reading

A Hawaiian Co-Op, 1918.

KA “HUI LOKAHI O NA HAWAII” KAUPALENAIA.

These passing day, Hawaiians like Mayor Joseph J. Fern, David Kalauokalani, Samuel C. Dwight, James L. Holt, Hon. William P. Jarrett, Hon. C. P. Iaukea and a number of other Hawaiians are joining together to establish a company that will deal in the sale of poi, beef, salmon, dried fish, and so forth; with the intent to help Hawaiians in all ways that will lessen their household expenses; because it is very clear these days that because the poi factory of Kalihi is not making poi now, the current poi manufacturers are greatly raising the price of poi to five cents per pound; this is a price not seen in the past ten years or more; so too with the price of beef; the Chinese are buying very fine beef from the company of C. J. Waller [Wala], but the Chinese are charging Hawaiians 35 cents per p0und; it is an exorbitant price which has never been seen before; and it is heard from the talk of the Chinese that they will raise the price of poi once again to 6 cents a pound; it was this that encouraged the Hawaiians to establish a company that could hold back the severe increasing of the prices of our foods, O Hawaiians, by the Chinese.

The establishing of a company amongst Hawaiians is important and crucial; but if we Hawaiians do not implement an endeavor that will help ourselves, there will  be no one else who will help us.

If we turn back and look at the history of Hawaii nei, we will see that the dissension amongst us Hawaiians was what wrenched away small businesses from us Hawaiians as well as all the other endeavors. Continue reading

A description of Honokohau, Maui, 1872.

The Features of Honokohau.

O Nupepa Kuokoa; Aloha oe:

May it please you and your Editor to insert this bundle of aloha in some open space of your depository, and it will be for you to share it amongst our masses.

Looking at the lay of the land, it is a beautiful place indeed; there is a deep river, and there is much taro; the area planted with kalo is approximately 5 miles long.

Pertaining to the evenness of the land.—The flat lands here are on the east side of the river, that being the famous plains of Kalaulaolao, and a mele for this fame is written of by the people of old.

Pertaining to the crops.—Things that are planted grow stuntedly [kakanalii] because of aphids [Eleao]; talk of the Eleao is all over Hilo Paliku. Continue reading

Hui Makaainana Hawaii and the farming of kalo, 1939.

Planting Taro

THE ORGANIZATION HAS STARTED THIS EFFORT

The Hui Makaainana Hawaii has Begun to Work on Land at Kapiolani

The idea of farming of kalo thought up by the Hui Makaainana Hawaii is now being carried out, according to Johnson Kahili, the chairman of the managing committee [komite hoohana].

The organization received approval to do this on government land near Kapiolani School [ke Kula o Kapiolani], and should the work go well, then perhaps some twenty acres of undeveloped land, nearly four acres, will be farmed, according to him. Continue reading