Band of Kalaupapa, 1893.

Correspondences

PERTAINING TO THE

Gift to the Band of Kalaupapa.

Honolulu, May 15, 1893.

Mr. Ambrose Hutchison,
Kalaupapa, Molokai.

Aloha oe:

The Hawaiian Gazette Company (Kuokoa Printing Company) has taken a collection and has made $207 from donations made by the few friends of the leprosy patients for the benefit of the Leprosy Band as per the list of names also sent. This sum of money is intended for purchasing uniforms if desired, along with caps, and to refurbish the instruments or to purchase new ones as necessary.

This sum of money is given to the President of the Board of Health, Hon. W. O. Smith, to hold for the purpose it was donated.

And we those who donated the money join together with us in joy in being able to help by supplying the things that will bring happiness to the leprosy patients on Molokai, by donating to the band some things that give them great enjoyment while they live a life of suffering.

However, we think that the band should give two performances every week when and where your local authorities [luna kuloko] decide, so that everyone can rejoice in the music. That is the desire of many of the donors.

Your true friend;

H. M. Whitney,
Manager of the Hawaiian Gazette Co.

———- Continue reading

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Hui Aloha Aina o Kalawao me Kalaupapa, 1898.

[Found under: “LOKAHI IO NO KA LAHUI.”]*

Kalaupapa, Mar. 4, 1898.

Miss Lucy Peabody,
Treasurer for the Funds of the Hawaiian Delegates.

Honolulu,

Aloha oe,

We are sending by your hand thirty dollars ($30.00). That being $25.00 from the Patriotic League of Kalawao and Kalaupapa, and a $5.00 gift from the Angel Society, “Hui Anela” of Kalaupapa, with hopes that the sum reaches your hand in entirety. Continue reading

Donation from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, 1898.

ASSISTANCE FOR THE DELEGATES.

The Treasurer of the Delegates’ Funds, Miss Lucy Peabody, received from the Head Secretary of the Patriotic League [Ahahui Aloha Aina] of the Hawaiian Archipelago, fifteen dollars ($15.00) from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, Molokai.

[Even fifteen dollars was a great sum of money during those days.]

(Aloha Aina, 2/26/1898, p. 5)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 9, Aoao 5. Feberuari 26, 1898.

Aloha Aina! 1898.

ALOHA FOR REMEMBERING.

Yes, our hearts are awed and deeply moved seeing the beloved assistance of the patients of Kalaupapa for the Delegates of the lahui. This is a great gift for us for it arrived like manna from heaven; the little amount that they sent is far greater than the thousands and hundreds from those who are prosperous.  For their living is not in luxury, nor in joy, but in constant grief, sorrow, and anguish. And as there was encouragement to all Patriots urging them to give assistance to our Delegates, a feeling of excitement awoke in the minds of these frail ones to give aloha to their fellow men who are tirelessly working in the fury of Washington for the rights of the land, the people, and the monarchy of Hawaii. Continue reading

S. K. Maialoha sent to Kalaupapa, 1905.

LEAVES THE LAND

SEES THE LAND OF SUFFERING AS A STRANGER.

O Swift Messenger of the communities of Hawaii, floating all the way foreign lands, Ke Aloha Aina Newspaper. Greetings:—

On the 12th of this September, in the morning hours, there was crying as people walked outside of the grounds of that hallowed castle, and at 8 o’clock or so was when our belongings were readied. The wailing was heard of women for their husbands, men for their wives, parents for their children, children for their parents, family for family.

And at 11 o’clock, the patients were called to board the car; a veil was spread, and people could no more see us; the cars left the grounds, and great mourning was heard; your writer saw his dear mama and our child for the last time; and the writer heard the calling of my beloved Ape, “O Papa, come back to me.” Continue reading

Leprosy patients wanting to be reexamined, 1909.

NOW 171 LEPERS KNOCKING AT THE DOOR OF HOPE

There are 171 inmates of the Leper Settlement who desire reexamination to decide whether they are now afflicted with the disease.

They will be examined at Kalaupapa by Dr. W. J. Goodhue, the resident physician, and Dr. J. T. Wayson, a member of the Board of Health. These doctors are the people’s own choice.

How it came that there are 171 wishing to avail themselves of the chance to be discharged comes about this way: When President E. A. Mott-Smith of the Board of Health was writing directions to Superintendent J. D. McVeigh regarding the examination of the nineteen named in Senator Harvey’s resolution and six or eight others who became applicants later, it occurred to him to have the superintendent ascertain if there were any other wanting to undergo the tests. The result is the list of 171 including the nineteen whose reexamination the Legislature ordered.

As reported in this paper last week, the applicants then on the list, having been asked to name the physicians they wished to examine them, all but five chose Dr. Goodhue. The five wanted Dr. O’Day, but on account of departure he was unavoidable. Another choice was offered the whole number, when Drs. Goodhue and Wayson were elected.

It was originally intended to bring the applicants to Honolulu for examination at the Kalihi receiving station, but this was found impracticable owing to the lack of accommodation. Dr. Wayson will go to Molokai at an appointed time to conduct the examination with Dr. Goodhue.

(Hawaiian Star, 8/24/1909, p. 1)

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The Hawaiian Star, Volume XVII, Number 5426, Page 1. August 24, 1909.

Partial list of those to be released from Kalaupapa? 1909.

LIST OF NAMES OF THE LEPROSY PATIENTS.

To the Editor of the Messenger of the Lahui, the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha no: Please allow some me some space in your delicate body, and it will be you that takes it about, so that the many friends may see that these are the parents, children, elders, grandchildren and the great grandchildren, returning back home. Perhaps not all named will leave this grave, perhaps but a fraction.

The writer was told that there were 108 names but all that was given him were 55 names, leaving 53 names. These are their names and the name of their doctor:

Continue reading