Smallpox on Kauai, 1881.

Letters and word arrived saying that smallpox appeared in Koolau on Kauai, upon people numbering 11. Sheriff Wilcox [luna makai Wilikoki] and his deputy acted quickly putting effort into quarantining against the spread, and immediately quarantined was all of the people living in Anahola all the way to where Bertlemann [Batelemana] lives, Continue reading

Paele was said to have jumped off Iliilikaa Cliff in Kalaupapa, 1892.

NEWS FROM  KALAWAO.

We received letters from the colony of Kalawao, island of Molokai, telling of some news from there.

MAN JUMPED OFF CLIFF.

On the 6th of this month, the Superintendent [Luna Nui] of the Colony of Kalawao received news that a man named Paele jumped off the cliff on the previous 5th. This man went to cut firewood on the Iliilikaa Cliff at Kalaupapa on the 5th of this month. And the people of the house were puzzled that he did not return that night. The following day, his dead body was found at the base of the Iliilikaa Cliff by Kaluna and Kawahauila, Continue reading

Reward for turning people in who secretly sell awa, 1869.

($20.00) REWARD!

I will give that money award to anyone who gets an Arrest Warrant and testifies before the Circuit Court Judge against the person or persons who,

SECRETLY SELL AWA,

in the District of Ewa and Waianae, and not at my Awa Shop in Waianae, Oahu.

William PINEHASA WOOD.


($10.00) REWARD

Continue reading

Duke H. Kahanamoku, father of the world-famous Duke P. Kahanamoku, passes on, 1917.

DUKE K. KAHANAMOKU LEAVES THIS LIFE BEHIND.

Thursday last week, Duke K. Kahanamoku [Duke H. Kahanamoku] grew weary of this worldly life, the father of the swimming champion of Hawaii nei, at his home at 1847 Ala Moana Road, Waikiki.

On that day mentioned, Kahanamoku went swimming at the ocean that afternoon for his health, and upon his return, he lay to rest before dinner, saying that he was feeling dizzy; and a few minutes thereafter, his life breath left him and he went to where all must go. It is said that the cause of his death was heart disease.

Duke K. Kahanamoku was born in this town on the 21st of July, 1869, and so he made 48 years old on this past 21st of July. The reason Kahanamoku was named “Duke” is because he was born on the day that the Duke of Edinburgh arrived in Honolulu nei, on that very year and day.

Duke K. Kahanamoku, who died, was employed in the police department here in Honolulu nei under William P. Jarrett as a bicycle officer, recorder of offenses, and sergeant, until he became police captain for an entire watch, and for some unknown reason, Kahanamoku left the police force and began to work once more with William P. Jarret at Kawa as a prison guard.

Duke K. Kahanamoku left behind a wife and six sons and three daughters grieving for him on this side of the dark river [muliwai eleele].

From Ke Aloha Aina, we join the family who are saddened for your loved one, but God will lighten all your burdens, for it is He who creates and He who takes away. It is His will that be done, not that of the children of man.

(Aloha Aina, 8/10/1917, p. 1)

HAALELE MAI O DUKE K. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 32, Aoao 1. Augate 10, 1917.

Duke runs for reelection as sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu, 1936.

Duke Kahanamoku Asks Sheriff Re-election On Basis of Present Record

Kahanamoku, scion of one of the few remaining full-blooded Hawaiian families in the islands, was responsible for returning the sheriff’s office, for the first 25 years of city and county government always held by a Democrat, to the Democratic fold after it had lapsed momentarily into the hands of the Republicans with results that are too well known and too well remembered by every resident of Hawaii to repeat here.

Perhaps the most famous living exponent of the Hawaiian race is Duke P. Kahanamoku, who first spread the name of the Territory over the newspapers and magazines of the world by his swimming prowess and is now seeking re-election as sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu on the Democratic ticket.

For Sheriff

DUKE P. KAHANAMOKU

The Duke first took the world by storm when, and absolutely unknown, he went to the quadrennial Olympic games as one of the American team and made a clean sweep of all the swimming events in which he was entered, establishing several world’s records that stood for many years. He repeated this performance in the following Olympic games and ruled supreme in acquatic affairs until his voluntary retirement from active competition.

On his return to Hawaii the gratitude of the citizens of the Territory was expressed in the form of a public fund which was used to provide a residence for the Kahanamoku family.

The Duke declares in his speeches that he carries on the duties of sheriff of the city and county in the clean and sportsmanlike manner which distinguished his athletic career.

Despite inadequate appropriations provided for the greatly needed new construction at the city and county jail, which is under the jurisdiction of the sheriff’s office, Kahanamoku has established an efficient record in the conduct of this institution—a record on which he is asking renomination at re-election.

“I am a man of few words,” the Duke declares. “When I was representing Hawaii against the best swimmers in the world, I never predicted that I would win any particular race—but I think I won my share. It is the same with the present race for the sheriff’s office.”

[Duke seems to have followed in the footsteps of his father. Duke P. Kahanamoku’s father, Duke K. Kahanamoku served in various positions in the police department, ultimately reaching the rank of captain.]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 9/24/1936, p. 1)

Duke Kahanamoku Asks Sheriff Re-election On Basis of Present Record

The Hawaii Democrat, Volume 9, Number 24, Page 1. September 24, 1936.

Pardons granted by Governor Pinkham, 1915.

GOVERNOR PARDONED A PRISONER.

This past Friday, Governor Pinkham forgave the punishment of a prisoner, and released for good five convicts from their imprisonment at Kawa.

The one who was pardoned was George Kealoha. He was found guilty on the 10th of this past month, November, for injuring a soldier, and the sentence he received from Judge Ashford was one year in prison.

From what was said, the reason for that the Governor ended the sentence of George Kealoha was because of a plea put before him, and in this document, it said that the wife of George Kealoha was very close to giving birth, and therefore, the Governor listened and signed his name to a document to end the sentence of that Hawaiian man.

Because of the many prisoners, they were released by the Governor; they were people who were imprisoned for some years but yet did not serve out their sentence.

(Kuokoa, 3/5/1915, p. 1)

HOOKUU KE KIAAINA I KEKAHI PAAHAO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 5, 1915.

Complaint against police officers in Kalaupapa, 1903.

RESPONSE TO THE POLICE OF KALAUPAPA.

Mr. Editor of Ke Aloha Aina,

Aloha oe:—

May it please your honorable to allow me the mouth of our cannon, and may you flash so that the honored members of the Legislature may see this:

The officers of Kalaupapa nei have made a petition asking the Legislature to increase their salary to $30 per month, being that their current pay is just $20; the asking of the officers for $30 a month is very questionable. What great work do we see them doing; is it going around to the homes of the patients and entering without search warrants, or when the Sheriff gives them orders, these officers do as they please?

They brush aside the orders from their Sheriff and return; they did not put their petition before their head, J. K. Waiamau [Deputy Superintendent], and I hear that they were all admonished; I truly believe that $20 a month is enough for them.

Here is another thing, your writer has heard that five kokua are being sent out, two men and three women. They have only two weeks to ready their belongings. Our Superintendent [McVeigh] is bristling.  I stop my pen here, and to the metal typesetting boys goes my greeting of good-bye all.

H. K. AKAMU.

Kalaupapa, Molokai, April 21, 1903.

(Aloha Aina, 4/25/1903, p. 8)

HE PANE I NA MAKAI O KALAUPAPA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 17, Aoao 8. Aperila 25, 1903.

Let the old men go forth and lie upon the roads… 1895.

“LAW OF THE PADDLE BLOW.”
[“MAMALAHOE KANAWAI.”]

This above are the initial words of the very first law promulgated in the communities of Hawaii, and those words spoken by one in authority still remain. Here below is the the law in its entirety:

“MAMALAHOE KANAWAI—Let the old men go forth and lie upon the roads; let the old women go forth and lie upon the roads; let the children go forth and lie upon the roads.”

This first law was proclaimed by Paiea (Kamehameha I) after his head was struck by some fishermen at the seashore in Puna, Hawaii, because they mistakenly thought he was someone else. When his head was struck with the blow from a canoe paddle, the men fled, there being five of them; that was when Paiea rose, picked up a rock, and made to chase after them, however, his foot was caught in a rock crevice, and his chase was cut short. The rock in his hand fell, and there was no getting it back. And it was this disappointment which caused him to proclaim these famous and powerful words in our history. The place where Paiea’s foot was caught can be seen to this day.

Here, we take what is shown on pages 94 and 95 of “Ka Buke Lapaau me na Mea Pili Kaulana” which was published by Kamaki [Thomas P. Spencer]:¹

“Soon after this battle (Kepuwahaulaula), the fishermen who years earlier struck the head of Kamehameha with a paddle near the sea were brought before him by his officers. This shameful act of theirs was made known to Kamehameha face to face, for which his officers demanded that they be killed by stoning them to death.

“The aloha Kamehameha had for his fellow man was expressed for the first time in his famous pardon by announcing:

“‘Mamalahoe Kanawai: you are prisoners of war, but you are forgiven for unwittingly striking my head–I escaped, but nearly was in trouble.’

“Here, O Reader, do recognize–love for his fellow man was the cure² for which allowed for the release of these rebels of Puna by Kamehameha, and him not giving regard to the calls by his officers to put them to death. This is a fine comparison to President Dole of the Republic; he with his Executive Powers does not come close to a hundredth of the Kanawai Mamalahoe, in his treatment of the Hawaiian prisoners of the revolution of January 17, 1895 who continue to be imprisoned albeit the lahui are united in wanting them released. That was an uncivilized time when [the men] were triumphantly released by Kamehameha, and this is a knowledge and civilization, and yet Dole has not given clemency to the Hawaiian prisoners for the fame of his name and that of his Nation.”

Our elucidation of this famous story is not like that of Spencer’s, but the basis of his explanation of Kamehameha’s forgiving those who injured him, that is what we want to make clear at this time, so that true love of one’s fellow man is seen by them.

¹This book was republished in 2003 by Bishop Museum Press as: Buke ‘Oihana Lapa’au me na ‘Apu la’au Hawai’i (Book of Medical Practices and Hawaiian Prescriptions). See here for further description.

²”Laau lapaau” [medicinal cure] is the word chosen here because this story appears in a book of traditional medicinal practices.

(Makaainana, 11/25/1895, p. 4)

"MAMALAHOE KANAWAI."

Ka Makaainana, Buke IV—-Ano Hou. Helu 22, Aoao 4. Novemaba 25, 1895.