Great Meeting of December 28, 1891 at Manamana, 1891.

MASS MEETING.

The Native Sons of Hawaii to the Front.

RESOLUTIONS AGAINST A REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENT ADOPTED.

Over six hundred people, Hawaiians and foreigners, were present at the mass meeting called by the Native Sons of Hawaii, and held at the Gymnasium on Monday evening. Many prominent natives were present and listened to the discourses of their wise leaders with attentive ears. Long before 7 o’clock streams of people were seen wending their way towards the Gymnasium. The Royal Hawaiian Band, under the leadership of Prof. D. K. Naone, was stationed on the makai end of the hall, and discoursed most eloquent music for over thirty minutes.

J. K. Kaulia, the Secretary of the Native Sons of Hawaii, called the meeting to order at 7:45 p. m.

Hon. A. Rosa was elected chairman of the meeting. On taking the chair, he said that he came as spectator only. He was not a candidate for the coming elections, and he was not a member of the society. He asked the audience to conduct the meting in an orderly manner, so that nothing would mar the success of the object in view.

Isaac D. Iaea was chosen secretary and Mr. Rosa interpreted the speeches in English.

The Chairman called upon the Rev. J. Waiamau to open the meeting with prayer which was done.

A. Rosa said: The subject for discussion this evening is, “Our denunciation against adopting a Republican for of Government for Hawaii.” You are at liberty to express your views, whether pro or con. The first speaker—J. L. Kaulukou—will speak against the Republican movement. The time allotted to each speaker is limited to ten minutes.

J. L. Kaulukou—Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: We are assembled here to-night because false rumors are being propagated abroad that we, native sons of the soil of Hawaii, are in favor of a Republican form of Government. Our bitterest enemies are doing their utmost to spread this unfounded report. It is our duty tonight at a mass meeting assembled, to notify the world at large that the aboriginal Hawaiians are body and soul against such a movement. We do not favor annexation either with America or with any other foreign power. We have called this meeting because foreigners abroad are entertaining this idea, which is most derogatory to our interests. Hawaiians are not the only one concerned in this question; foreigners, too, who have adopted Hawaii as their home; they have a right to stand up and denounce this movement. [Applause.[ A queen now reigns over us. It is our duty as loyal citizens to do our utmost to perpetuate the throne of Hawaii. England cherishes her Queen, and we should adore our Queen. Our ancestors have been accustomed to a monarchial form of government, and we, the younger generations, have been instilled with undying loyalty to our sovereign. Our forefathers considered “love of the throne, love of country and love of the people” as one, but we have divided it into three distinct persons. I will now read to you the following resolutions, carefully prepared by a committee of the Native Sons of Hawaii: Continue reading

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More on the 11th of June in Kalaupapa, 1904.

11th of June

Sports at Kalaupapa

High holiday [Kamehameha Day] was kept by the inhabitants of the Leper Settlement throughout the 11th of June. As a matter of fact the jollification began on the eve of Kamehameha Day, with a concert by the “H. H. K.’s” [Hui Hooikaika Kino] or the Kalaupapa Athletic Club, in Beretania hall. The program consisted of athletic exercises, singing, etc.

At 7 a. m., on the 11th the boys of Baldwin Home, Kalawao, headed by their band, set out for Kalaupapa to attend the day’s sports and games. The first event was a shooting match for a dinner, between teams captained by Dr. Goodhue and Superintendent McVeigh. It began at 8 o’clock. The Kalawao band played at short intervals during the match. McVeigh’s team won, so that the doctor’s side had to provide the dinner. Following is the score, ten rounds each:

PROGRAM 11TH OF JUNE SPORTS AT KALAUPAPA.

Shooting match for a dinner furnished by the losing team. The match commenced at 8 a. m. Following are the scores:

FIRST TEAM.

J. D. McVeigh ….. 43
J. K. Waiamau ….. 38
Kea Kaehanui ….. 38
M. Klammer ….. 38
J. K. Alapai ….. 36
J. S. Wilmington ….. 32
W. Bruns ….. 31
E. Van Lil ….. 31
Chas. Roth ….. 31
John Forbes ….. 31
Kalani Kaena ….. 30
Wm. Paoo ….. 20
Alex. Smith ….. 19
Punilio ….. 17
Total ….. 435

SECOND TEAM.

W. J. Goodhue …. 37
Achong Holuk ….. 36
Jas. Amaka ….. 36
Haumea ….. 34
Kaaihue ….. 34
Geo. Kanikau ….. 34
Geo. Kaaepa ….. 32
Silas Carter ….. 31
J. H. Imihia ….. 31
N. Kealoha ….. 29
I. Hoolapa ….. 29
Chas. Manua ….. 24
D. N. Nawelu ….. 17
Kaha ….. 15
Total ….. 119

The horse races began at 12 o’clock on the quarter mile track. There was a great turnout of the people and enthusiasm ran high. Drays had been sent around the Settlement to fetch all who were unable to walk. The judges were: Jas. Harvest, chairman; George Kanikau, Achong Ho Luk, Jno. K. Waiamau and John T. Unea (teacher). Following is the program of the races with the winners noted:

HORSE RACES.

1. Match Race—½ mile. Purse, $10.00. Entries: Maluikeao, by Jno. Naluai; Spanish, by S. Carter. Won by Spanish.
2. Bicycle Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $3.00. Entries: Jno. Fernandez, Kawehi, A. Galaspo. Won by A. Galespo.
3. Horse Race—½ mile. Free to all; for horses not entered in any race before. Purse, $7.00. Entries: Keahi o Wailuku, by Jno. Naluai; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter. Won by Kalaupapa Girl.
4. Relay Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $4.00. No entries.
5. Pony Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $8.00. Entries: Baltimore, by R. Kekipi; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing. Won by Kaukaiwa.
6. Wheelbarrow Race—¼ mile. Purse, $4.00. Entries: D. Ku, J. Kauhane, Kakae, Sol. Momoa. Won by Sol. Momoa.
7. Women’s Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $5.00. Entries: Lively, by Kaupali; Billy Huihui, by Punohu. Won by Billy Huihui.
8. Barrel Race—¼ mile. Purse, $1.50. Entries: J. Kauhane, Sol. Momoa, Kakae, Hamauku, Kawehi. Won by Sol. Momoa.
9. Horse Race—¼ mile. Free to all. Purse, $5.00. Entries: Maluikeao, by Jno. Naluai; Kaukeano, by S. Carter. Winner undecided. Dead heat.
10. Foot Race—¼ mile. Purse, $2.00. Entries: J. Kauhane, Kawehi, Hulihee, Sol. Momoa. Won by J. Kauhane.
11. Pony Race—¼ mile. Free to all. Purse, $4.00. Entries: Bob, by J. Moloni; Keahi o Wailuku, by Jno. Naluai; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter. Won by Kaukaiwa.
12. Saddle Relay Race—½ mile. Purse, $4.00. Entries: 1st team—Kamaka, Levi, Holokahiki, Kaena; 2nd team—Nawelu, Kahaulelio, S. Kaai, Moloni. Won by first team.
13. Scrub Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $3.00. Entries: Midnight, by J. Moloni; Bay View, by J. Kapuni; Mikimiki, by S. Carter. Won by Bay View.
14. Foot Race—½ mile. For boys under 13 years of age. Purse, $2.00. Entries: J. Hanakahi, Kelii, J. Francisco. Won by J. Hanakahi.
15. Winners’ Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $12.00. Entries: Spanish, by S. Carter; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing. Won by Spanish.

THE DINNER.

“It was a dandy dinner,” Superintendent McVeigh said yesterday, referring to the evening feast on the shooting match. All the concomitants of a first-class luau were provided, including a bounteous supply of roast pig, together with soda water and cake in abundance. About 120 of the people partook of the repast. The festivities lasted until 12 o’clock Saturday night. In the course of the luau a hearty vote of thanks was passed to the Honolulu contributors of funds for the day’s celebration, with special mention of Acting Governor Atkinson’s agency in soliciting contributions.

“There was never a better behaved crowd,” Mr. McVeigh said with reference to the sports. “At the shooting match nobody was allowed to speak while one was taking aim. They whooped it up, good and strong, after the match and at the horse races.”

PATRIOTIC DISPLAY.

A goodly display of flags was made during the day. The Stars and Stripes was flying on the schoolhouse, the storehouse, the Settlement office, the superintendent’s house and the doctor’s house.

A good day’s sport is expected at the Settlement on the Fourth of July, to consist of athletic exercises and games in the daytime and fireworks in the evening. The good-hearted Honolulu folks will no doubt make timely contributions of money and articles of values for prizes.

[This article followed the illustration by John K. Waiamau posted earlier today.]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 6/17/1904, p. 5)

11th of June

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXIX, Number 49, Page 5. June 17,

More on John K. Waiamau and others, 1893.

PERSONAL.

President Dole’s illness has been caused by an ulcerated tooth. He is now on the mend.

John K. Waiamau, the accomplished young architect is going to Chicago at the expense of his employer, C. B. Ripley to study architectural drawing.

Ornithologist Palmer returned on the Pele last evening from Makaweli, where he has been collecting birds for the British Museum.

(Hawaiian Star, 8/18/1893, p. 2)

PERSONAL.

The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 122, Page 2. August 18, 1893.

Complaint against police officers in Kalaupapa, 1903.

RESPONSE TO THE POLICE OF KALAUPAPA.

Mr. Editor of Ke Aloha Aina,

Aloha oe:—

May it please your honorable to allow me the mouth of our cannon, and may you flash so that the honored members of the Legislature may see this:

The officers of Kalaupapa nei have made a petition asking the Legislature to increase their salary to $30 per month, being that their current pay is just $20; the asking of the officers for $30 a month is very questionable. What great work do we see them doing; is it going around to the homes of the patients and entering without search warrants, or when the Sheriff gives them orders, these officers do as they please?

They brush aside the orders from their Sheriff and return; they did not put their petition before their head, J. K. Waiamau [Deputy Superintendent], and I hear that they were all admonished; I truly believe that $20 a month is enough for them.

Here is another thing, your writer has heard that five kokua are being sent out, two men and three women. They have only two weeks to ready their belongings. Our Superintendent [McVeigh] is bristling.  I stop my pen here, and to the metal typesetting boys goes my greeting of good-bye all.

H. K. AKAMU.

Kalaupapa, Molokai, April 21, 1903.

(Aloha Aina, 4/25/1903, p. 8)

HE PANE I NA MAKAI O KALAUPAPA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 17, Aoao 8. Aperila 25, 1903.

First Kamehameha class reunites, 1916.

TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

Students of the ’91 Graduate Class of Kamehameha: Those standing from the Left—Thomas N. Haae, Charles Blake, William M. Keolanui, Samuel Kauhane, Fred K. Beckley, William K. Rathburn. Those seated—Solomon Hanohano, John K. Waiamau, William O. Crowell, Charles E. King, and Samuel Keliinoi.

[There are many priceless articles on this reunion; this includes the one that accompanies the picture which can be found here from pages 1 & 3.

It is pretty awesome that we can compare the graduation portrait of the class of 1891 which is on the Kamehameha Schools Archives page with this picture from 25 years later!]

(Kuokoa, 6/16/1916, p. 3)

HOOMANAO I KA PIHA ANA O NA MAKAHIKI HE IWAKALUA-KUMAMALIMA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 24, Aoao 3. Iune 16, 1916.

 

The first Kamehameha class celebrates reunion, 1916.

The Alumni Remember

For the 25th anniversary of their graduation from Kamehameha School, the boys of the class of 1891 are looking back; it is the first class that graduated from that school, under the principal Rev. W. B. Oleson.

The 10th, 11th, and 12th of upcoming June will be set aside as time to reflect by the students still alive today.

From within the class of 14 that graduated in 1891, there are 12 of them still living, and two that passed away. Those residing in this town are: Charles E. King, Samuel Keliinoi, Frederick William Beckley, Solomon Hanohano, William K. Rathburn, and John K. Waiamau. On Hawaii island are Samuel Kauhane, William M. Keolanui, Enock Brown [Enoch Brown], and Thomas N. Haae. On Kauai is Charles Blake and William O. Crowell. The students who passed away are Robert Pahau and Moses Kauwe.

(Kuokoa, 5/12/1916, p. 1)

E HOOMANAO ANA NA HAUMANA KAHIKO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 19, Aoao 1. Mei 12, 1916.