Hawaiian birds and the law, 1865.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

KNOW YOU ALL BY THIS Announcement; prohibited totally is the catching and the killing of Oo and Mamo birds living on the personal lands of King Kamehameha V, and from this day forward, no Oo is to be injured or killed on the lands of the Monarch; not by using lime [ke kapili kepau ana], not by snaring [ka ahele puka kaula], not by shooting [ke ki pu ana]; it is totally kapu. The person or persons who go against the words above, they each can be prosecuted.

R. KEELIKOLANI,

Governor of Hawaii.

Hilo, Hawaii, August 1, 1865.

[Might any of you law people know if there were any Kingdom laws on the books that outlawed the catching or killing of native birds? I have seen laws prohibiting the killing of non-native birds, but not native birds.]

(Au Okoa, 9/4/1865, p. 4)

OLELO HOOLAHA.

Ke Au Okoa, Buke I, Helu 20, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 4, 1865.

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More on John K. Waiamau and others, 1893.

PERSONAL.

President Dole’s illness has been caused by an ulcerated tooth. He is now on the mend.

John K. Waiamau, the accomplished young architect is going to Chicago at the expense of his employer, C. B. Ripley to study architectural drawing.

Ornithologist Palmer returned on the Pele last evening from Makaweli, where he has been collecting birds for the British Museum.

(Hawaiian Star, 8/18/1893, p. 2)

PERSONAL.

The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 122, Page 2. August 18, 1893.

On Statehood, Republicans, Elepaio, and Voting Rights,1912.

STATEHOOD AND THE ELEPAIO

It has been many years during which the Republican party has held power in the governing of the Territory of Hawaii, and Hawaii has not at all been made into a state, where we’d be able to vote for our own governor, our chief justices, circuit court judges, Senators, and representatives in our legislature, and other many heads of government. However, the cry of those Republicans in their workplace to make Hawaii a State, does not cease.  It is ten years that Kuhio has been in the Legislature in Washington, and he has not put a bit of effort into making Hawaii a state. The Republicans are like the Elepaio bird who crying goes, “Ono ka ia! Ono ka ia! [I crave fish! I crave fish!]” This bird just cries out, but does not venture to the sea to catch fish. But its cry atop logs is what makes canoes bug ridden [pu-ha]. Ten years of crying “Mokuaina no Hawaii! Mokuaina no Hawaii! Mokuaina no Hawaii! [Statehood for Hawaii! Statehood for Hawaii! Statehood for Hawaii!]” But there has been no statehood at all; one session of the legislature passes by and the next comes, and then passes by, and so forth. But the Elepaio (Republican) continues to cry, “Ono ka ia! (I Mokuaina no Hawaii.) Ono ka ia! (I Mokuaina no Hawaii.) Yet they do nothing so that Hawaii would attain statehood.

(Aloha Aina, 10/26/1912, p. 2)

KA MOKUAINA AME KA ELEPAIO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 26, 1912.

Bird catching, 1866.

[Found under: “SMALL NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

Bird snaring.—We received a letter by T. P. Kaaeae of Hamakua, Hawaii, saying that the men and women of that area are joined together in great numbers in climbing into the forests to snare birds [kapili manu; kawili manu]. And the number of birds caught by a person in a day is from six to thirty. The bird being caught is the Oo of the forests.

(Kuokoa, 3/17/1866, p. 2)

Kawili manu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 11, Aoao 2. Maraki 17, 1866.