Great Meeting of December 28, 1891 at Manamana, 1891.

MASS MEETING.

The Native Sons of Hawaii to the Front.

RESOLUTIONS AGAINST A REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENT ADOPTED.

Over six hundred people, Hawaiians and foreigners, were present at the mass meeting called by the Native Sons of Hawaii, and held at the Gymnasium on Monday evening. Many prominent natives were present and listened to the discourses of their wise leaders with attentive ears. Long before 7 o’clock streams of people were seen wending their way towards the Gymnasium. The Royal Hawaiian Band, under the leadership of Prof. D. K. Naone, was stationed on the makai end of the hall, and discoursed most eloquent music for over thirty minutes.

J. K. Kaulia, the Secretary of the Native Sons of Hawaii, called the meeting to order at 7:45 p. m.

Hon. A. Rosa was elected chairman of the meeting. On taking the chair, he said that he came as spectator only. He was not a candidate for the coming elections, and he was not a member of the society. He asked the audience to conduct the meting in an orderly manner, so that nothing would mar the success of the object in view.

Isaac D. Iaea was chosen secretary and Mr. Rosa interpreted the speeches in English.

The Chairman called upon the Rev. J. Waiamau to open the meeting with prayer which was done.

A. Rosa said: The subject for discussion this evening is, “Our denunciation against adopting a Republican for of Government for Hawaii.” You are at liberty to express your views, whether pro or con. The first speaker—J. L. Kaulukou—will speak against the Republican movement. The time allotted to each speaker is limited to ten minutes.

J. L. Kaulukou—Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: We are assembled here to-night because false rumors are being propagated abroad that we, native sons of the soil of Hawaii, are in favor of a Republican form of Government. Our bitterest enemies are doing their utmost to spread this unfounded report. It is our duty tonight at a mass meeting assembled, to notify the world at large that the aboriginal Hawaiians are body and soul against such a movement. We do not favor annexation either with America or with any other foreign power. We have called this meeting because foreigners abroad are entertaining this idea, which is most derogatory to our interests. Hawaiians are not the only one concerned in this question; foreigners, too, who have adopted Hawaii as their home; they have a right to stand up and denounce this movement. [Applause.[ A queen now reigns over us. It is our duty as loyal citizens to do our utmost to perpetuate the throne of Hawaii. England cherishes her Queen, and we should adore our Queen. Our ancestors have been accustomed to a monarchial form of government, and we, the younger generations, have been instilled with undying loyalty to our sovereign. Our forefathers considered “love of the throne, love of country and love of the people” as one, but we have divided it into three distinct persons. I will now read to you the following resolutions, carefully prepared by a committee of the Native Sons of Hawaii: Continue reading

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“He make no ka ka haole, a he ola no hoi; pela no na Kahuna Hawaii.” 1872.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

LET ALL MEN know the thoughts of the Hawaiian Medical Practitioners [Kahuna Lapaau Hawaii], they who number one hundred and fifty. O Ke Au Okoa, speak their thoughts. About how we will bear this immense right of ours impeccably, without deceit. Let them be instructed to put behind these evil thing: evil sorcery [anaana], imitative magic [hoopiopio], sending spirits [hoounauna], and the deification of all evil things; Continue reading

Pressured by their teachers, 1893.

THE SCHOOLS OF SAINT LOUIS AND KAMEHAMEHA.

We were told that the students of Saint Louis School [ke Kula o Sana Lui] were prohibited from placing the ribbon of the annexationists upon their chests. And we were also informed that the students of Kamehameha

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Be vigilant. Just because someone claims to represent you, does that necessarily mean it is so? 1893 / timeless.

HOW IS IT POSSIBLE?

Yes, how can Stevens [John L. Stevens] make himself so brazen and say that his appearance, his voice, and his words—that they represent the Hawaiian people, all the while that that Stevens is in the United States? This is something that is appalling to us, but there are many things that will shock someone, and at times we just want to suppress that feeling, but we cannot, because of how blatant the examples. However, while we may be in shock, the shock of Thurston and his group will greatly surpass this, when they realize that they  met up with the spirit of the waters of Eleile that turn back ti leaves,* and they will realize that the sentiment of the Americans will turn back as well when they hear the truth.

[Many times people don’t pay attention to what is happening outside their own community because they have a job to do, or they have children to care for, or this, or that. Let us be vigilant during these upcoming years. The future generations deserve our attention.]

* See Mary Kawena Pukui’s ʻŌlelo Noʻeau: Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Saying, #1649 about the current in the pool of Eleile which turns back stalks of ti leaves thrown into it by visitors.

(Hawaii Holomua, 2/15/1893, p. 2)

HawaiiHolomua_2_15_1893_2.png

Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 160, Aoao 2. Feberuari 15, 1893.

Some advice from the past to composers of today, 1893.

ALL MELE HAVE KAONA.

Each Mele that is composed has its own nature, and there are results that follow that cannot be avoided. Should the words of the composition be good from beginning to end, then those who understand mele composition [haku mele] will say that the mele (prayer) is a good one; however, should the words be off, and syllables are dropped, and words of unfortunate nature result, those knowledgeable in haku mele will say that the pule (mele) is not good.

A mele is a prophesy in times of trouble, and it is a prayer that asks to be fulfilled. So it was in the ancient times of Miriam folks; and so it was in ancient times in Hawaii nei, and so it is today.

We publish once again the famous mele composed by Mrs. Kekoaohiwaikalani pertaining to our Hawaiian Band [Bana Lahui] who are enduring the hardships of these trying times we are living in.

[Doesn’t this sound like a call from the past to those of today?]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 9/8/1893, p. 2)

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Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 765, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 8, 1893.

Mele for the Claudine, the vessel that carried the commission of annexationists to Washington DC, 1893.

KELAUDINA SONG.

Kaulana mai nei Kelaudina
Ahailono o ka poe pakaha
Nau i lawe aku na komisina
O ke aupuni kuloko o Hawaii
Hopuhopualulu e ka hele’na
A na elele o ua aupuni nei
E ake ana e hookoia
Ka iini pakaha aina
Halawai aku nei lakou
Me kahi paele a Kalivilana Continue reading

On patriotism, 1894.

THE ARRANT COWARDS.

It is refreshing to hear the supporters of the revolutionary Americans accuse the loyal citizens of Hawaii of cowardice. The attitude on the 17th of January of the men, who boast of their patriotism and heroism, was not a proof of the qualities now claimed by them. The p. gs. remind us of the small boy standing behind his big and armed brother—and two policemen as guards—yelling to the lonely boy on the other side with no arms and no police: “Come on, come on you coward and I will fix you.”

The abject cowardice of the government was further illustrated today. A well-known contractor, a man of many years residence, and of unblemished standing in this community desired some cartridges for his revolver. He as many other civilized citizens enjoy during their stay at the Waikiki beach all manly sports, and he fishes, rows, jumps, boxes, and shoots to the target. As a law-abiding citizen he made a formal request to the fir of E. O. Hall & Son, for 100 cartridges and his requisition was returned crossed in red ink “refused by the Marshal.” Continue reading