Hoihoi! 1903.

ENGLISH IS SHUT OUT

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE PREFER THE HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE AND HAVE TAKEN TO DEBATING IN THAT TONGUE WITHOUT ANY INTERPRETATION—LONG DISCUSSION MEANINGLESS TO THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING PUBLIC. Continue reading

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Provisional Government promoting Nupepa Kuokoa Puka La, 1893.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.”]

“Ka Leo o ka Lahui,” Hon. J. E. Bush’s daily, is now under the management of Hon. Joseph Nawahi, of Hilo, Hawaii. Continue reading

Mrs. William Hall, 1893.

HAWAII.

Mrs. William Hall Tells of the Arrival of Commissioner Blount.

Disappointment Created by the Taking Down of Old Glory.

How Annexation is Viewed by the People of the Sandwich Islands.

The Daily Rumors Which Alternately Buoy the Annexationists and Royalists.

The following letter from Honolulu was written to Minneapolis friends by Mrs. William Hall, daughter of Mrs. C. O. Van Cleve, the wife of a missionary to the Sandwich islands, and has resided on the islands for the past 30 years. Mrs. Hall’s husband is also a son of a missionary. The story of the courtship and marriage is romantic, for Mr. Hall was visiting Minneapolis when he met Miss Van Cleve, and he fell in love with her at sight. He had only a short time to remain, and as Gen. Van Cleve was then out with a command,the impatient young lover made the journey to the general’s station to tell him he had laid siege to the the daughter’s heart, and that she would surrender if the father gave his consent. Miss Van Cleve afterwards went out to the Sandwich islands, where she was married and began missionary labors with her husband. The letter was written early in April, just after the lowering of the American flag on the islands.

Honolulu, April 5, 1893.

Just as we were in the midst of writing for the mail by the Australia last Wednesday, the telephone announced a United States steamer off Koko Head, supposed to be the revenue cutter Richard Rush, bringing commissioners from Washington to the Hawaiian government. This proved to be correct, and hurrying our letters, we repaired to the water front to see what was to be seen.

The streets were full of people and full of flags. Chicago will hardly fly more bunting to the square yard at the opening of the Columbian Exposition. Everyone hung out a flag of some kind, mostly American, though I noticed “The harp that once through Tara’s halls the soul of music shed,” is hanging “mute” on a green field between two brick buildings on the corner of Fort and Hotel streets, and I think likely, if the trade wind continues as vigorous as at present a few days longer, the cord (chord) will “indignant break.” But to return to our muttons, otherwise streets.

One feature of the display was a procession of native women dressed in white and bearing Hawaiian and American flags, marching down to the wharf to receive and welcome the commissioners.

The Rush entered the harbor and took her place in the naval row. The American minister, the consul, and a committee of three gentlemen boarded her from a steam launch just before she entered the harbor.

It soon became noised abroad that only one commissioner had arrived, and he would not  land for an hour or two. There was some disappointment among the natives when they heard that Admiral Brown had not been sent; others did not quite know whether to be glad or sorry that only one man had been entrusted with this mission.

Soon after the cutter anchored, Maj. Robertson, the ex-queen’s chamberlain, went on board and, presenting the queen’s compliments, offered the commission her carriage in which to ride to the hotel. The offer was declined with thanks, the commissioner had already declined several offers of the kind, preferring to ride in his private carriage. Continue reading

Vote for Hawaiians? 1893.

“STILL HARPING ON MY DAUGHTER.”

The Star is either densely stupid, or deeply dishonest, in its attitude on the question of the suffrage and of the civil and political rights of the Hawaiian, under annexation. In fact, annexation, in view of the prospects of certain early changes in our political conditions can no longer claim a place among the questions of practical politics impending over us. But, aside from that, we would again point out the weakness in the assumption of the annexation organs upon this point of Hawaiian suffrage. The Star says of the Hawaiian,—”Annexation offers him equal citizenship.” It does nothing of the kind. It offers him no citizenship at all, while robbing him of that which he has hitherto enjoyed. We challenge the organs to point to any pledge, on the part of any person, or body of men, authorized to take action in the premises, at all calculated to assure the Hawaiian of any political rights whatever, in case of annexation. Continue reading

Names not to be forgotten, 1893.

THE NATURE OF THE HAWAIIAN FLAG.

The Hawaiian Flag is one of the most glorious Flags, and it is so pleasant to look upon, and like the nature of the Flag, so too the People.

The brown-skinned [ili ulaula] Hawaiian Lahui are a kind People, are modest, treasure malihini, are welcoming, have open hearts, and so forth.

But even if the Hawaiian Flag and her People are kindhearted, they have been trampled upon by the descendants of the missionaries, and are being paid back with poisonous words, even more so than the Auhuhu.¹

It is being said that they are a Lahui that is stupid, know nothing, pagan, idol worshiper, and on and on.

That is what we the Hawaiian People get in return.

But despite all of their abuse, we are not full of hate at the actions of these missionary descendants.

The people who tried to grab our beloved land; and their names shall not be forgotten by this Lahui.

They being: Albert Francis Judd [Alapaki F. Kauka]; William Richards Castle [W. R. Kakela]; Lorrin Andrews Thurston [L. A. Kakina]; Amos Francis Cooke [F. Kuke]; William Brewster Oleson [W. B. Olesona]; Henry Martyn Whitney [H. M. Wini]; Dr. Charles M. Hyde [Kauka Hai]; Sereno Edwards Bishop [Kahunapule Bihopa], who was raised by a Hawaiian woman at Kona, Hawaii; Sanford Ballard Dole [S. B. Dole]; William Owen Smith [W. O. Smith]; the Emerson brothers [na hoahanau Emekona]; William W. Hall [Wile Holo]; and some others.

All of them is who brought down our Flag, by lowering it and raising the American flag in its place.

However, under God’s benevolence, our flag has been returned to its rightful place.

So therefore, O Hawaiian People, we are prepared to lay out before you the full list of names of these great transgressors.

¹Auhuhu is a plant that was used in fishing as a fish poison.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 10/13/1893, p. 2)

KE KULANA O KA HAE HAWAII.

John Taylor Unea, agent for “Ke Aloha Aina” in Kalaupapa, 1917.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

To all the people of Kalaupapa, Molokai, who want a paper this coming year, A. D. 1918; leave your subscription with John T. Unea, along with the money. This will be an important year for us ahead, that being the politics of the Territory, therefore, we should not live in darkness.

(Aloha Aina, 12/28/1917, p. 2)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 28, 1917.

John L. Stevens’ outrageous impudence, 1893.

HAWAII BELONGS TO THE HAWAIIANS.

The administration at Washington has the unqualified support of this magazine (The Illustrated American) in its course of conduct in the Hawaiian affair.In acknowledging the tremendous wrong committed by ex-Minister Stevens, while acting as the nation’s, representative at the Court of Queen Liliuokalani, President Cleveland and his Secretary of State have shown splendid courage and refreshing disdain of buncombe. All the facts in the case proves Stevens’ behavior while Minister at Honolulu to have been prompted by rank ignorance or complete disregard of right or decency. Stevens openly encouraged a portion of the Queen’s subjects in their preparations for rebellion and promised them every possible material assistance, the moment they furnished him with the shadow of an excuse for such a step. Continue reading