“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

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More on the leprosy patients, 1868.

The Lepers.—The active measures of the Board of Health to make another thorough examination of the Islands, for the purpose of staying the spread of leprosy, has attracted public attention to what is being done, in this matter of the public health. As the settlement at Molokai becomes thoroughly organized, and its comfortable provision for the lepers becomes better known, there is less dread and less unwillingness on the part of the suspected, to report themselves for examination. With a perseverance in the course adopted, the lepers throughout the Islands will soon be all gathered in and disposed of in the quarters assigned for their future residence. Continue reading

Kuhio talks to the Sana Lui graduates, 1918.

KUHIO EXPRESSES HIS THOUGHTS

Honolulu, July 8.—At a party given by the Saint Louis Alumni Association [Hui Haumana Mua o Sana Lui], that was in the evening of this past Sunday, Representative Kuhio was invited to speak before that banquet, and he spoke without mincing his words. He strongly criticized W. R. Farrington and Frank Atherton, the owners of the Star-Bulletin newspaper, and called that newspaper, “A newspaper for the rich,” Continue reading

Fishing using explosives, 1895.

The Blasting of Fish Prevails.

Mr. Editor:

On the travels of the Circuit Court Judge of Maui, to Kaupo, Kipahulu, Hana, and all the way to the Koolau cliffs of Maui, to ask for money for the building of Wailuku, and we were lucky in what money was collected. I was one who went along on this journey. When we reached Kipahulu, to Hakuole’s place, a policeman, with his son, Kimo Hakuole who is a school teacher; the locals were very hospitable. Continue reading

This letter to the editor of the Nuhou is interesting in so many ways. 1873.

NOT GOOD.

When I saw the newspaper Nuhou Hawaii; I was greatly gladdened to see it. When I took a close look, I was very happy. I talked with my wife, “Hey, this paper, Nuhou Hawaii, it is very good for us to subscribe to this paper.” Please don’t be upset at my bad writing. Gibson, I have much appreciation for you; at your great strength in saying that they should not give Puuloa [Pearl Harbor]. I talk in Chinese; all of Honolulu is appreciative of you. Continue reading

Memorial of Protest from the women of Hilo, 1898.

KUE MEMORIALA.

O makou o na Komite o ka Ahahui Aloha Aina o na Wahine i kohoia e ka halawai i noho ma ka la 29 o Sepatemaba 1898, ma Hilo Taona.

Ma keia ke kue loa aku nei i ka Memoriala a ka Ahahui Kuwaena o ka Ahahui Aloha Aina o na Wahine o Honolulu, malalo o na kumu kupono. Continue reading

From the Ahahui Aloha Aina Kuwaena o na Wahine, 1898.

THE UMBILICAL CORD OF THE SIBLINGS ARE CUT.

This is something we made known from the very beginning, during the days when the tender-eyed ladies of the Women’s Central Patriotic League [Ahahui Aloha Aina Kuwaena o na Wahine] were drawing away [huki laweau]; when their kindling was not placed where the flames were burning, and now we received by way of the Kinau on Saturday night, that the Women’s Patriotic League of Hilo requested to dissolve their membership under the Women’s Central Patriotic League here in Honolulu; they, who we restrained from the beginning, not to do what the majority of the nation does not want, and here is the result; the umbilical cords of the siblings are cut, by way of a Memorial from there, and that is what is below, so that it is seen by everyone without fail.

(Aloha Aina, 10/8/1898, p. 3)

AlohaAina_10_8_1898_3

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 41, Aoao 3. Okatoba 8, 1898.