Mali leo, 1893.

Equal Rights Under America.

Editor Bulletin:—

The P. C. A. [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] and Liberal are giving us a duet about the benefits we will derive from annexation. The music is very sweet, but I for one am inclined to be sceptical and want a whole ton of salt with their literary effusions. I can see where owners of Government bonds and water front lots on Pearl Harbor will get the benefits of annexation, but the planters and natives—to use a slang expression—their benefits are out of sight, the planters lose everything and get nothing, and I would like to ask the editor of the Liberal (for the P. C. A. man knows nothing about it), what grounds he has for thinking the kanaka will be any better treated than the Indian or Negro. Continue reading

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The Manihiki, “only kanakas,” 1871.

Returning Manahikians.—On Thursday last, forty-two men and women, and twenty-three children, natives of the Humphrey’s and other islands to the southward of the line, who were brought here two years ago under contracts of service, sailed in the ketch Lunalilo, to be returned to their homes. Continue reading

Commentary on annexation from a hundred and fifty years ago. 1869.

A few Independent Thoughts on Annexation.

To the Editor—Sir:—As the laws of debate require, and your liberal principles allow each side to be heard, I submit the following lines to the public.

In all speculative propositions, it is necessary to examine their basis, that a predisposing bias may not violate truth. Continue reading

“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading