And of course, rice, 1862.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

RICE.—We are overjoyed to see that rice is planted by one of our friends, S. Kamakahiki, in Hana, East Maui; there is a lot of grain and it is of good quality; why O Friends, are you dallying on planting this good source of money? We are amazed at the small number of people undertaking the growing of rice in Hana, for this is how it is, according to the letter of S. Kamakahiki, like this:

“I am the only one growing Rice here in Hana; I am harvesting the Rice and storing it at my house; I am filled with joy that I have found this good occupation.”

(Kuokoa, 2/15/1862, p. 2)

Raiki.

Cotton was grown here too, 1863.

Petaining to Cotton.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:

I am reporting to you that the Cotton [Pulupulu] (Sea Island Cotton) is sprouting well in Waimea, Koolauloa, Oahu; you will surely rejoice with my fellow Cotton planters living in other places of these Islands, who planted this thing, Pulupulu, like me.

In the month of February of this very year I planted this Cotton field; it is perhaps an Acre and a half large, and because of the strong wind and the saturating showers of those days, the sprouting was late and slow; and some of it was eaten [amu ia] by army worms [“moo that sleep in the earth”] (kupa). In the month of April, that problem was over, and now, the plants have triumphed; they are growing well; it is like grape vines that are crawling here and there, and the bolls are developing; some are almost mature; I look over their bolls with satisfaction. I am not the only one who planted Cotton here in Waimea, but there are others who planted as well, because of your encouragement.

J. M. Kalanipoo.
Waimea, Oahu, June 22, 1863.

(Kuokoa, 6/27/1863, p. 1)

Kuokoa_6_27_1863_1

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Silk worms grown in Koloa, Kauai in 1836?

1836, the beginnings of sericulture on Kauai. 1843.

SILK. NUMBER 2.

In the year 1836, Mr. Peke and Kale made ready to farm silk [silika] in Koloa, Kauai, and afterwards the two were joined by Mr. Jarvis [Mi. Javisa]. They put much effort into this without caring about money spent to make it a success. They immediately planted ilima found growing here. They went to get ilima [? mulberry] seeds from China and brought back branches of the ilima lau nui from America. Mr. Peke went to the United States of America to see silk production there, and to find what it took to raise them in this archipelago; he returned without anything lacking, with the necessary gear, and sufficient workers, but the work was difficult and did not move forward. They kept at it, and some years went by, and they gave up. Many thousands of dollars was wasted on it.

Kapena and others also came with Mr. Peke, and leased other lands in Koloa, with thoughts of raising silk there. He planted ilima, built a residence, a building to raise the worms, and a house for the workers. They began the work, but in not much time, it was a bust. Here are the reasons that it was a waste of time in Koloa: there is a strong wind so the ilima does not grow well as the leaves are torn in the strong wind and wilt, the worms don’t grow well there; and the people also, they are not eager and do not keep at the work; they come some days and slack off, are lazy and leave. Today, the ilima of those silk lands are all pulled out and sugar is planted there. So sad for those foreigners who wasted their money in this endeavor. A new enterprise almost started there to make the nation rich.

(Nonanona, 1/3/1843, p. 78)

SILIKA. HELU 2.

(Nonanona, 1/3/1843, p. 79)

...kekahi aina okoa ma Koloa...

Tobacco was not the only thing people have tried to grow here. A rubber plantation? 1907.

More on rubber cultivation in Hawaii nei. 1907.

A RUBBER ASSOCIATION TO BE ESTABLISHED ON MAUI.

MAUI. June 1.—A business meeting was held at the Kahului Baldwin National Bank [Banako Lahui a Baldwin o Kahului] by people seriously planting and raising rubber [raba] in this Archipelago, and the outcome of the meeting was the establishment of an Association called “Ka Ahahui Hawaii a ka Poe Hooulu Raba [Hawaiian Rubber Growers’ Association]”.

It seems that when looking at this, this is the first association of its kind established in the whole of the United States of America, and it is a fact that it will start and strive to push forward the planting and growing of rubber in the Archipelago.

In the meeting, D. C. Lindsay was chosen as president, and Doctor E. C. Waterhouse as vice president, Hugh Howell, the Secretary and Treasurer, and H. A. Baldwin and James L. Coke as fellow advisors.

And after consideration, Messrs. Lindsay and Coke and Pogue were chosen as members of the committee to draft bylaws and rules for the Association.

Also at this meeting was Mr. J. G. Smith of the American Agricultural Experiment Station [Kahua Hoao Houlu Meakanu o Amerika] in Honolulu and he gave some valuable advice relating to the planting and the wide distribution of rubber. At a proper time, another meeting will be held.

In the thoughts of Mr. Smith, after he searched and investigated about growing rubber in Hawaii, he found that it is a very valuable endeavor that will bring good fortune to the land and it is well that the growing of rubber in Hawaii be called a rich mine. This declaration was perhaps enough of a statement befitting the importance of this effort to raise rubber. This is a truly lucrative endeavor.

(Kuokoa, 6/7/1907, p. 5)

KUKULUIA HE AHAHUI RABA MA MAUI.

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Wahinekeouli Pa’s mele for the Kilauea Lighthouse, 2020.

Did you see yesterday’s Mele Monday post from Bishop Museum? It was a mele we previously posted a while back. Click here to see the mele (with a little variation) and translation by Mary Kawena Pukui.

Another mele for Kilauea Lighthouse, 1919.

HE MELE NO KA HALE KUKUI O KILAUEA.

HALE IPUKUKUI O KILAUEA, KAUAI.

Nani wale ka uwila i Kilauea,
E anapa mai la i ka paia lani;
Hoike mai ana i kona nani,
He malamalama oi kelakela;
Helu ekahi a o Hawaii nei.
Ma ka lihi kai o ka Pakipika;
Ua ana pono ia kona enekini,
No kanaha mile kona mamao;
Kaomi lima ia iho ke pihi,
E niniu ia no umi kekona;
Hihiu na hana a ka Puakea,
He oi pakela a ke akamai;
I hana noeau ia e Palani,
Me na waihooluu like ole;
He kinohinohi ke ike aku,
Ka anapa a ka onohi kaimana,
Ua hanaia a ku i ka nani,
Molina wai gula anapanapa;
Ka papa dala ke kahua ia,
Ka hulali a ka wai hoohinuhinu;
Ua kohu lihilihi anuenue,
Ka alohi, ka anapa ke ike aku,
Haina ia mai ana ka puana,
Hale kukui nani a o Hawaii nei.

Hakuia e MRS. W. PA.

Hanalei, Kauai.

(Kuokoa, 5/2/1919, p. 3)

HE MELE NO KA HALE KUKUI O KILAUEA.

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