Does anyone have more information on this photographer? 1866.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

New Pictures.—With the return of J. Valentine, the haole photographer who sailed to Kauai some months ago, he has printed some of his pictures which he showed as lantern slides [kana mau kii i hoolele aku ai]. Continue reading

Double wedding at the home of Samuel Parker, Minister of Foreign Affairs, 1892.

Double Wedding.

At the hour of 11 in the midday, April 26, at the festooned residence here in Honolulu nei of His Excellency [ka Mea Mahalo ia] Samuel Parker, Minister of Foreign Affairs, joined together by Rev. A. Mackintosh were Charles Maguire and Miss Mary H. Parker, the first born of the Minister, honored by the groomsman and bridesmaid [ku aoao], Palmer Woods and Miss Kamakee Cummins. At the same time and place, by that same pastor, Mr. Robert R. Hind Jr. and Miss Hannah Low were joined together, honored by the groomsman and bridesmaid, William Wright and Miss Hassinger. Amongst those who came to witness this distinguished marriage were the Alii the Queen, Continue reading

Passing of Benjamin Nalaeelua Kahalepuna, 1937.

B. N. Kahalepuna Called By Death

Was 25 Years In Employ Of Territory

Benjamin N. Kahalepuna, 58, died Monday at his home at 2310 Pauoa road after a brief illness. He was born at Kaneohe, Oahu, September 7, 1879, and had served in the territorial government for more than 25 years.

He was appointed to the bureau of conveyances in 1898 and two years later served as a school teacher. In 1907 he was appointed to a position in the sheriff’s office under Col. Curtis P. Iaukea, and was later given the position of sergeant of police under W. P. Jarrett. Continue reading

Queen Elizabeth yesterday brought to mind the good Samaritan, 2020.

Ka Samarita Lokomaikai.
Pauku Baibala, Luka 10:25–37.

25 Aia hoi, ku ae la iluna kekahi kakaolelo e hoao ana ia ia, ninau aku la, E ke kumu, heaha ka’u e hana’i i loaa mai ai ia’u ke ola mau loa?

26 A ninau mai la oia ia ia, Heaha ka mea i kakauia’i iloko o ke kanawai? Pehea kau heluhelu ana?

27 Hai aku la ke kakaolelo, i aku la, E aloha aku uoe i ka Haku i kou Akua me kou naau a pau, a me kou uhane a pau, a me kou ikaika a pau, a me kou manao a pau, a i kou hoalauna e like me oe iho. Continue reading

Christmas greetings, 1939.

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO THE READER FRIENDS OF THE HOKU O HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii

Offered and Dedicated to the Hawaiian Lahui

Star of Hawaii (Printed in English and Hawaiian)

Vol. XXXIV HILO, HAWAII, T. H. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1939 No. 34

[And Merry Christmas as well to all of the Reader Friends of this little blog!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/30/1939, p. 1)

HokuoHawaii_12_20_1939_1

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIV, Number 34, Page 1. Dekemaba 30, 1939.

Hui Manuihi formation, 1938.

Hilo Bird Lovers Form New Club

HILO, Nov. 2—Hilo’s first bird club, which is affiliated with the National Association of Audubon Societies, met last night at the Hilo Center.

Members in attendance were: Mrs. Robert Baldwin, president; B. D. Chilson, first vice president; L. W. Branch, second vice president; Miss Ethel Tomoguchi, treasurer; and Mrs. Peter Arioli, secretary. The club adopted Manuihi Society as its official name.

[I was wondering for a while what the Hui Manuihi referred to. See this earlier post about a report on the apapane given by the Hui Manuihi.]

(Advertiser, 11/4/1938, p. 4)

Honolulu Advertiser, 83rd Year, Number 18,668, Page 4. November 4, 1938.

E please mai hoi oe, e ke aloha, 1920.

Those who are in debt in paying for the life of our Hoku newspaper, please keep its life in mind for the upcoming year. The cost of the paper used to print the Hoku is rising, and it is only fair for the people who are in debt to its life remember. Please.

[The subscription rate for the Hoku remained at $2.00 per year for its entire existence. The first privately run newspapers Hoku o ka Pakipika and Nupepa Kuokoa (from the 1860s) both went for that rate as well!

With the times being how they are, first, consider giving donations to food banks and organizations that are providing help to those in need physically and emotionally, and then second, perhaps consider giving a donation to the Library & Archives at Bishop Museum who care for much of the old newspapers and so much more history of Hawaii nei.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/16/1920, p. 4)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIV, Helu 30, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 16, 1920.