Na Hoonanea o ka Manawa, 1887.

Has anyone seen a Hawaiian language story magazine called “Na Hoonanea o ka Manawa,” or “Ka Hoonanea o ka Manawa”? It was probably put out by Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe.

How many paintings did Nawahi actually do?

[Found under: “KELA ME KEIA.”]

In the window of the book store of Whitney and Robinson, there are a number of beautiful paintings drawn and painted by Hon. Joseph Nawahi of the lava that is frightening Hilo.

(Elele Poakolu, 7/6/1881, p. 1)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke II, Helu 18, Aoao 1. Iulai 6, 1881.

Stephen Reynolds, aka Lanai has passed on, 1857.

Dead.—S. Reynolds, Esq., that being Lanai, has died at his place of birth, near Boston, A. H.*

(Hae Hawaii, 9/23/1857, p. 102)

[When doing research on people in the newspapers, it is important to not only look up the given names of the person you are looking for, but also other names the person was known by. Here we see Lanai is what they called Stephen Reynolds.]

*A.H. probably stands for Amerika Huipuia (United States of America).

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou, Helu 26, Aoao 102. Sepetemaba 23, 1857.

Before there were Hawaiian language newspapers, there were over ten years of printing!

Tomorrow makes 200 years since the first printing took place in Hawaiʻi nei!

This commemorative plaque is in front of the Hale Paʻi at the Hawaiian Mission Houses in Honolulu. Tomorrow morning they are having a historic reenactment of the 1822 press pull in person and livestreamed as well!

For more information on this and other bicentennial commemorations they are holding this year, click on the images below.

Keaomelemele, 2021!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXIII, Helu 36, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 6, 1884.

It has been 137 years since the famous Composer of  Stories Moses Manu first published the story of Keaomelemele in Ka Nupepa Kuokoa. The story was translated by Mary Kawena Pukui many years ago and was first published in Hawaiian and English in 2002. It has been out of print for years.

I just heard that Bishop Museum Press has finally received reprints of the book and it is now available for purchase! Click the image below to be taken to the Bishop Museum Press page where you can order a copy today.

keaomelemele

Thanks for spreading the word about the awesomeness of the Hawaiian language newspapers!

I realize there have been no posts lately, but I have been taking a little break.

But today on the 10th anniversary since our first post(?!), I wanted to say thank you to those who have been spreading interest in the Hawaiian language newspapers. It is time that they are redigitized from the original newspapers, so an o is not confused with an e, or an m with a w, or a t with an l!

Queen Kapiʻolani’s motto was not, “Kūlia i kahi hiki.”

Kūlia i ka nuʻu.

I just saw Bishop Museum Press reprinted the Hawaiian and English Cross-Age Learning Picture Vocabulary Book, 2021.

What is New is Old, 2021 / 1938.

Did you see the announcement from Bishop Museum Press saying that the Hawaiian and English Cross-Age Learning Picture Vocabulary Book is back in print after a long time of not being available. For more information about the book and how to order copies for people you know, click the image below.

The reprint of the vocabulary book reminded me of an earlier column appearing in Hoku o Hawaii starting in 1938. It was called “He haawina i kekahi poe,” and was started to help people learn Hawaiian and to increase the number of subscriptions to the newspaper. This column would continue on until 4/19/1939. “Lesson in Hawaiian” followed from 4/26/1939 until 6/20/1945. Continue reading

I was asked once if other ethnicities put ads in Hawaiian language newspapers…

…I think if you wanted to sell your products, yes, you did.

 

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 39, Aoao 2. Feberuari 27, 1913.
The Hawaii Shokumin Shinbun, Number 484, September 6, 1912.
Hawaii Herald, Volume XVII, Number 22, Page 4. January 17, 1913.