Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society and the importing of plants and animals, 1865.

[Communicated.]

Mr. Editor:—The eminent success which has attended Dr. Hillebrand’s first consignment of plants and birds per Alberto for the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society, ought certainly to operate as a stimulus to all who feel interested in the material progress of these islands, to lend a helping hand to enable him to avail freely of the facilities and opportunities he now possesses of procuring and forwarding here the vast number of plants, &c., suitable to our climate, Continue reading

Charles H. Wilcox and Elizabeth Waterhouse perish in automobile accident, 1920.

CHAS. H. WILCOX AND NIECE DIE IN AUTO CRASH

Car Skids and Goes Over 150 Foot Precipice—Wife and Child Narrowly Escape With Their Lives.

The Wilcox party had been spending the day, Sunday, June 20, at Kokee, at the C. H. Wilcox place, and left for home early in the afternoon. They were in three cars—the Misses Wilcox in advance, the C. H. Wilcox family next, and the Crawfords and Mrs. P. L. Rice, last. Continue reading

Reminiscences of Haena,

THE STORIED PLACES OF HAENA

Some years ago, you would go by horse to see the wet caves at Haena. Now, the tourists can go easily and get to these wet caves; you travel on the pali to get to Haena.

Now cars can go and look into one of the waters called by the name Waiakanaloa.

One of these wet caves is above another wet cave; you climb up and get to where you can look down and ?????? the frigid waters like ice.

However before you reach this wet cave mentioned before, you will see a dry cave, and that is Maniniholo.

In previous times of Haena, Kakuai, some sightseers ???? into these wet caves, they boarded canoes and entered and jumped into the cold waters. Some people say that the body of the bathers turn white like snow, and the water is very cold when it touches the skin.

It is not known where the water comes from, but there is water there, it is as if these famous wet caves come up from the earth.

Maniniholo is not a wet cave; you can go in it but it is not like before when people just stood at one place, because dirt has been spread, so some places are stable, and it is filled over with sand from the beach. There are a lot of different things that are being told by those writing about storied places of these areas and the stories of the very old past. You leave these caves and you get to the cliffs where firebrands were thrown in the early days of this land. Leave there and then you see the heiau where Lohiau stayed, and now, in that place is the beautiful home of the Brown brothers [hoahanau Balaunu], the children of Mrs. Irene Kahalelaukoa [Ii] Brown before, but recently Mrs. C. S. Holloway.

That is where you see the stone foundation where Lohiau lived, and there he danced hula [???? hula ???? hele] with Hiiakaikapoliopele after Hiiaka sought to save Lohiau, and after he was revived, they left on their travels to Hawaii Island.

There are many fine things in this area of Haena along with their stories which are being greatly sought after by those writing the history of Hawaii.

[This article continues on, but it gets harder and harder to read. Hopefully the original is clearer so one day we can see what the article actually says!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/6/1931, p. 2)

HokuoHawaii_1_6_1931_2

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXIV, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Ianuari 6, 1931.

Pickled mango recipe, 1926.

PICKLED MANGOES

Syrup—

1 c. sugar; ½ c. vinegar, add a few cloves and pepper corn.

2 c. half-ripe fruit, cut into small pieces. Boil until tender.

(Advertiser, 5/28/1926, p. 7)

Advertiser_5_28_1926_7

Honolulu Advertiser, 70th Year, Number 13,990, Page 7. May 28,  1926.

Whether it be 1926 or 2020, receiving a gift of pickled mangoes is a precious thing.

Mahalo.

mango

Wahinekeouli Pa’s mele for the Kilauea Lighthouse, 2020.

Did you see yesterday’s Mele Monday post from Bishop Museum? It was a mele we previously posted a while back. Click here to see the mele (with a little variation) and translation by Mary Kawena Pukui.

Another mele for Kilauea Lighthouse, 1919.

HE MELE NO KA HALE KUKUI O KILAUEA.

HALE IPUKUKUI O KILAUEA, KAUAI.

Nani wale ka uwila i Kilauea,
E anapa mai la i ka paia lani;
Hoike mai ana i kona nani,
He malamalama oi kelakela;
Helu ekahi a o Hawaii nei.
Ma ka lihi kai o ka Pakipika;
Ua ana pono ia kona enekini,
No kanaha mile kona mamao;
Kaomi lima ia iho ke pihi,
E niniu ia no umi kekona;
Hihiu na hana a ka Puakea,
He oi pakela a ke akamai;
I hana noeau ia e Palani,
Me na waihooluu like ole;
He kinohinohi ke ike aku,
Ka anapa a ka onohi kaimana,
Ua hanaia a ku i ka nani,
Molina wai gula anapanapa;
Ka papa dala ke kahua ia,
Ka hulali a ka wai hoohinuhinu;
Ua kohu lihilihi anuenue,
Ka alohi, ka anapa ke ike aku,
Haina ia mai ana ka puana,
Hale kukui nani a o Hawaii nei.

Hakuia e MRS. W. PA.

Hanalei, Kauai.

(Kuokoa, 5/2/1919, p. 3)

HE MELE NO KA HALE KUKUI O KILAUEA.

Continue reading

On huli and planting and the ebook coming out from Bishop Museum Press, 1857/2020.

[Found under: “NO KA MAHIAI.”]

Not all kinds of huli are suitable for planting in wet patches. If the corm has been too closely cut off from the bottom of the huli and the huli itself is too small, it is not good for planting. If the taro has rotted and only a third remains good, Continue reading

Kalo planting and an ebook from Bishop Museum Press, 1922/2020.

[Found under: “KE ANO O KE KALAIAINA.”]

On  making loʻi if it was not done previously. I learned to make wet patches for four years at Lahainaluna. If it was desirable to convert a piece of dry land into a wet patch, they looked to see how water could be brought to it, because water was important. . . . If the patch was 20 fathoms long and 10 fathoms [anana, arm span] wide, we made them with shovels and the few pickaxes that we had. The soil near the banks was tossed up on them. The banks were made well, they were solid and thick. In digging with the shovel from the upper to the lower end and from one side to the other there was no part of the patch that was not dug. It looked level and even. Then the water was run into it and then the uneven places were seen, some deep, some high. The deep places were filled in. When it was seen that it was level then water was allowed to run in. We brought the oxen, that pulled the carts over the plains, and put them into the newly made patch and the oxen trampled on the earth up and down, to-and-fro. If we wanted some fun like the oxen, we increased the water in which to play. . . . Continue reading

First hula competition at Merrie Monarch Festival? 1967.

Fifth Hula Festival Scheduled Friday

The Fifth Annual Hula Festival, sponsored by the Hawaii County Parks and Recreation Department, is scheduled Friday at 7:30 p.m., at Hilo Civic Auditorium.

The Hula Pageant, under the direction of Mrs. Piilani Nahiwa, will be held in conjunction with the Merry Monarch Festival and Pageant. Continue reading