Death of Pilipo Naone, John K. Naone’s father, 1882.

PILIPO NAONE.

On the 16th of February past, Naone let out his last breath, and the man returned to his Lord whom he loved greatly, for whom he was a servant in many good works; Naone died at eighty or so years old. He was born up in Pauoa. His father was Mahi and his  mother was Hama [?? it is hard to read]; his parents were from Kauai and then resided in Pauoa; these parents had three children: Pokaakua, along with P. Naone and D. Lima; Pokaakua and Lima died ealier, and only Naone lived until old age, living for more than 80 years. Continue reading

Repost of the announcement attributed to Mrs. Maule of Waihee, 1893.

Mistaken.—I am the one whose name appears below, I show myself before the public, that I signed the aloha aina paper was not right; being that I signed my name without being explained what makes aloha aina right. And being that it was made clear to me the good and the benefits of annexation, with it right and correct in my understanding. Continue reading

“Kuhihewa,” Kuokoa, 5/6/1893, p. 2.

[This is the article referred to by Mrs. Maule in the previous post. It is hard to read because the right side of the page this appears on fell into shadow because of the binding of the newspaper into a book. Interestingly, there is another similar article that appears right above this one that is attributed to another person from Waihee, S. Hookano.]

(Kuokoa, 5/6/1893, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXII, Helu 18, Aoao 2. Mei 6, 1893.

The difference between information printed in books and information printed in the newspapers, 1834.

A Printing error.

On page four of this Ka Lama, there is a printing error. Here is what it said,

The farming stick [oo mahi] that they used in the olden times, was ule,¹ and alahee, and so forth; But this is what is correct, The farming stick that they used in the olden times was ulei,² and alahee, Continue reading

Marriage of Mikala Kamalimali, April 24, 1839.

Puawaina, May 6, 1839.

A MARRIAGE.

Hear me, O K. H. [Kumu Hawaii Newspaper]

I am telling you of something that I witnessed.

Mr. Sila* of the United States was married to a woman here in Honolulu; Mikala Kamalimali is the name of his wife, the daughter of Mamala; the 24th of April was when they were married, at the house of Bingham [Binamu], the pastor here in Honolulu. Continue reading

Vital Statistics, 1913.

Napoleon Kalolii Pukui marries Mary Kawena Wiggin on 5/9/1913!

Because of the condition of the image, you will not be able to do a search on Papakilo and find Wiggin or Pukui that will point you to this article…

nupepa

MARRIAGES.

John K. Mailua to Mrs. Hattie K. Nahia, May 3.
Napoleon K. Pukui to Mary Abbie Wiggin, May 9.
Willie A. Macy to Caroline K. Spencer, May 10.
David Oneha to Anna More, May 13.

DEATHS.

William Kahilikolo Jr., on School Street, May 7.
Kealakai Kanoa, on Kunawai Lane, Mei ?.
Hanale Napuupahee, at Leahi Home, May 10.
A baby of Moses Keaupuni, on Mokauea Street, May 10.
Edward Malaihi Holi, at Queen’s Hospital, May 10.
Charles Hanapi, at Leahi Home, May 11.
Pilemena Kalimapehu, on South Street, May 11.
William Purdy, on Ilaniwai Street, May 12.
Momona Kanohokai, on Liliha Street, May 13.

[Check out the listing under Marriages; a name that should be familiar to one and all!]

(Kuokoa, 5/16/1913, p. 4)

NA MARE. / NA MAKE. Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 19, Aoao 4. Mei 16, 1913.

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It is almost Mothers’ Day, and I just came across this article, so…, 1863.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Prizing the Lahui.—We have heard that the Honorable R. C. Wyllie is considering presenting medals to some women living on his lands at Hanalei; the reason for him doing so is because of the great number of children these women gave birth to, that being 15 children of one, and the same for the other; and a majority of the children survive. Continue reading