Drive with caution! 1917–Today.

A GIRL OF FIVE YEARS OLD DIED FROM BEING HIT BY AN AUTOMOBILE.

On the morning of this past Wednesday, a girl of five years old, by the name of Leimomi Kekaha, who lived on Auld Lane in Kapalama, was hit on King Street near Desha Lane.

The one to whom belonged the car which hit [the girl] is Charles Hubert, the person who owns an automobile stand in Iwilei.

Right after the girl was hit, she was taken to the emergency hospital [haukapila o na poe ulia], but she died soon after because of a skull fracture. Continue reading

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More on William Kanakanui, 1934.

In Command

LT. WILLIAM KANAKANUI
on guard ship

Lt. Kanakanui To Command Guard Ship For Flight

Lieut. (jg) William Kanakanui, USN, member of a well-known kamaaina family and once-famous swimmer for Punahou and the U.S. Naval academy, was given command of the minsweeper USS Tanager this week in accordance with orders from the Navy department at Washington, D.C.

Lieut. Kanakanui will be in charge of the vessel as she takes her station far out in the Pacific as a weather reporting ship for the six navy planes scheduled to hop off for Pearl Harbor from San Francisco January 12. The Tanager will be stationed at latitude 34, longitude 150, or several hundred miles north of the planes’ route.

While at the Naval academy over a decade ago Kanakanui won national recognition as a swimmer, setting several records. He was a member of the swimming team during his four years at the Academy. He had been well known in local aquatic circles while at Punahou, where he received his prep school training.

[You should always look at all sources when doing research. You never know which newspaper will give more/different information on your subject!]

(Advertiser, 1/5/1934, p. 2)

Advertiser_1_5_1934_2

The Honolulu Advertiser, 78th Year, Number 16,858, Page 2. January 5, 1934.

Law on naming, 1863.

Pertaining to Names.

Because we come across all sorts of names, and because we believe that the Law passed on the 24th of August, 1860; that being the Law called, “An Act to regulate names” [“He Kanawai e hooponopono ana i na inoa”] has not been followed, therefore, we wanted to discuss this Important matter with our friends. So that our friends do not fail to recognize this, we print the aforementioned Law, and here it is:

AN ACT
TO REGULATE NAMES.

Be it enacted, By the King, the Nobles and Representatives of the Hawaiian Islands, in Legislative Council assembled:

Section 1. All married women now living, and all that may be married hereafter on these Islands, shall, from and after the passage of this Act, adopt the names o f their husbands as a family  name.

Section 2. All children born in wedlock after the passage of this Act shall have their father’s name as a family name. They shall, besides, have a Christian name suitable to their sex.

Section 3. All illegitimate children born after the passage of this Act shall have their mother’s name as a family name. They shall, besides, have a Christian name suitable to their sex.

Section 4. All children up to the age of twenty years shall adopt the names of their fathers as a family name.

Section 5. All names so adopted shall be reported to the agents appointed to take the census of the people during the present year.

Section 6. It shall not be lawful to change any name adopted or conferred under the law. It shall also not be lawful to change any name adopted or conferred before the operation of this.

Section 7. The father or mother of any child born subsequently to the passage of this Act, shall report the name or names of such child to the Registrar of births for the district in which such child was born, within three months after the birth of such child.

Section 8. This law shall take effect from and after the date of its passage.

Approved this 24th of August, A. D. 1860.

KAMEHAMEHA,
KAAHUMANU.* Continue reading

Pass down the moolelo! 2017.

What are we doing today to carry on the legacy of that writer of moolelo? Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau and his fellow scholars at Lahainaluna were taught to do research and to write down and teach the moolelo of their people.

He says in a response to a critique that alii genealogy was very kapu and was not to be given to anyone else except their own children, “In my opinion, should Kauakahiakaola folks, the genealogists, arise from the realm of po, they will rejoice in this [my telling of chiefly genealogies], for it is gone with them, and they would be happy to see it once more.” (“He wahi ai no ka Nonanona…” Nonanona, 2/14/1843, p. 92)

Pass down the moolelo you do know to the next generation, whether they be family moolelo, or otherwise. Learn more moolelo. Pass them down.

Conclusion of Kamakau’s “Ancient matters…” 1845.

…standing. Then the Hawaiians said, “The haole said that there at Molea at Hamakua is kapu for marking fishes.” Then the Hawaiians shouted, it was as if the haole knew where the fishes were marked!

By S. M. Kamakau.

[Where would we be without Kamakau? Hauoli la hanau ia oe, e Manaiakalani!]

(Elele, 2/10/1846, pp. 180)

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Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 1, Pepa 23, Aoao 180. Feberuari 10,  1846.