Patriotism, 1893.

THE PEOPLE OF HAWAII HAVE ALOHA FOR THEIR ALII.

From ancient times, from all the way into the realm of po, from early on, from the very beginning, born was the aloha of Hawaiian Men, Hawaiian Women, and the Offspring of their loins, for their Alii, all the way until this very day; it would seem that it is greater than anything else pertaining to their sovereign, and it would seem there is no greater proof than the words pronounced by our King Kauliluaikeanuwaialeale [Kalakaua], when he went on that famous trip around the world in the year 1881, and upon his treading once more upon his birth sands; this is what he stated:

KE KAENA A KA MOI KALAKAUA.

Ua kaahele au maluna o ka ilihonua me ka moana,
A Inia mamao, a me Kina kaulana,
Hoea i na aekai o Aferika, a na palena o Europa,
A halawai me ka ikaika o na aina a pau,
A ia’u i ku ai ma ka aoao o na Poo Aupuni,
Ka poe mana maluna o ka lakou ma ka hiehie Alii,
Hoomaopopo iho la i ka uku-iki, a nawaliwali o Ko’u,
Me Ko’u Nohoalii i hookahuaia maluna o kahi puu Pele,
A ma kahi o na miliona i hooko i ka keia mau Moi,
He mau tausani wale iho no malalo o Ko’u malu,
Aka, ka upu nei loko, Na’u ke Kaena hiki,
Aia he mau nani maloko o na poai o Ko’u mau aekai—
I oi aku ka makamae i ka O’u mau hoa Moi,
Aohe O’u kumu hopo maloko o Ko’u Aupuni,
He hiki ke hui me Ko’u lahui me ka weli ole,
Aohe maka’u No’u iho, me ke kiai pili-paa ole ia,
A Na’u ke Kaena, he momi i hoounaia mailuna mai Na’u—
Eia ia’u ke aloha oiaio o Ko’u Lahui.

[The first time I heard these powerful words was from a Palani Vaughan record (and looking back, I think he is one of the many reasons why this blog exists today). I heard it and thought man, that is definitely not a boast that could seriously be claimed by any other of his fellow leaders of his time (so much less by those of today). And when I first saw Kalakaua’s words restated in this article after the overthrow, it made the statement even more profound. This, by the way, was so important that they reprinted it again on 1/21/1893!

For the English version from an article right after Kalakaua’s return, click here! Learn the stories!! Pass them forward!!!]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/18/1893, p. 3)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 141, Aoao 3. Ianuari 18, 1893.

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The Heens, and why we need to rescan the old Hawaiian newspapers, 1906.

A Festive Marriage with Honor

MR. and MRS. W. H. HEEN.

AMONGST delightful sprigs of white carnations blossoms entwined with delicate fronds of palai fern decorating the interior of the church of St. Andrew, the sacred matrimony between Miss Lily Notley and Mr. William H. Heen, Esq., of the Legal Profession of Hawaii, was held, and Rev. Fitz married the two of them in peaceful reverence. The young woman was escorted by Mrs. Leslie, and the young gentleman by his brother [hoa hanau], Mr. Afong Heen.

Charles Kahiliaulani Notley, the birth parent of the bride, gave his beloved lei upon the altar of matrimony, the foundation for one to live amongst the circle of those who live in proper and chaste families in this world.

The Gentlemen who attended to this assembly of friends were Mr. H. A. Kaulukou, associate of Mr. W. H. Heen in the legal profession; William Jordan and John Marcallino.

The woman was dressed in a wedding dress of white silk made with great skill; and the man was dressed in the usual attire for that occasion.

Continue reading

Terrorism even here? 1926.

KNIFE USED AS NAIL TO AFFIX NOTE ON DOOR

The Ku Klux Klan Association is here in this town according to Maurice Rey, the owner of a hair salon on Emma Street. According to the claim of Rey before Detective Kellett, this past Saturday, he found a warning of troubles that would be carried out upon him, and for that reason he wanted to be put under the protection of the police force, and he also asked that he be protected from wrongdoings by a group of degenerates seen often in his area.

When he went to his place of work in the morning of this past Saturday, the first thing his eyes saw was a note on the door affixed by a knife painted red, the paint still fresh on the knife. These are the words written on the note. “Mr. Freitchie, Do not let the sun set upon you in this town. BEWARE, K. K. K.”

The police department is in charge of being vigilant against this type of terroristic activity, and they will try to search out and arrest the Imperial Wizard of the Klan living here in this town.

[Stand up against cowardly acts of bullying and terrorism.]

(Kuokoa, 11/18/1926, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXV, Helu 46, Aoao 2. Novemaba 18, 1926.

The newspapers may not always report “the truth,” but they are a priceless source for historical information, 1864, Today, and Tomorrow.

The newspapers are someplace we should be looking at for other ways to look at Hawaiian history.

Newspapers, unlike books were relatively easy to come by (whether it was by subscription, or by sharing with a neighbor).

Most people could not afford to publish books, but many people had the means to purchase pen and paper and envelope and stamp, so that they could send in their thoughts to be printed. And many in fact did. They wanted the truth as they knew it to be known by all. And because newspapers were printed regularly, it was easy to immediately comment on errors appearing in the pages of the paper. There are often heated debates over everything and anything from genealogy, to mele, to why you should not lend money to that man or woman who left a marriage bed. These debates not only took place in a single newspaper title, but often ran in totally different newspapers and sometimes even in both Hawaiian and English publications.

The information given by S. W. B. Kaulainamoku appearing in the previous post for instance is contested a month later by P. S. Pakele. He says, “…it is for you all to see which one is true, with my thought that perhaps the one who published earlier is right, and perhaps not; the same with this, perhaps it is right, and perhaps not; my confidence is with you all.”

Many generations of Hawaiians contributed information to the newspapers, because they knew that the information they submitted was not only for them at the time but more importantly for Hawaiians of today and tomorrow.

Hawaiian Newspapers, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

For a long time, I was sure that anybody who was interested in Hawaiian moolelo, whether it be language, or history, or mele, or kaao, or genealogy, or education, or winds/rains, or thought would know that there are online generations and generations of newspapers available online, whether it be in English (at http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/) or Hawaiian (at http://papakilodatabase.com/pdnupepa/cgi-bin/pdnupepa?a=q). It seems that I was wrong.

If you have by chance to an opportunity to spread the word that there are available word-searchable Hawaiian newspapers that you can look through for different ways to look at history, please do.

It is time that we look at history in different ways.

J. H. Kanepuu plans to publish a book filled with genealogies of the people, 1881.

A PLEA.

I want to publish and distribute a book of Hawaiian Moolelo [Buke Moolelo Hawaii] for all the people of this lahui; and my great desire is for the questions below to be answered, so that the book can be filled with all of the genealogies [mookuauhau]. Continue reading