Death of a different George Makalena, 1878.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Death of G. C. McLean.—This past Tuesday, Keoki Makalena [George McLean], a haole very familiar to there people here in Honolulu, died; and he was the one who owns the Shop called, “Ka Halekuai Bolabola.”*

[Oftentimes foreign people were given Hawaiianized names like Makalena for McLean, Wilikina for Wilson, or Poe for Boyd. I have started tracking some of these names, because I think it would be helpful when doing research in Hawaiian language documents. See the list by clicking here.]

*George Christie McLean was also known to Hawaiians as Bolabola. His store seems to have been known in English as George C. McLean’s Store.

(Kuokoa, 12/14/1878, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVII, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 14, 1878.

The function of warships, 1856.

[Found under: “Ka Hoku Loa o Hawaii”]

What is the nature of a warship [Manuwa]?—Is it something that destroys? It is supplied with weapons of war to bring punishment upon the unethical [kolohe] lands who act unethically towards the land to whom the ship belongs. It is something that protects those who go to foreign lands to Trade, so that the way of life and trade there is protected. That is its main purpose when there is no war. Let us not be mistaken, it is something that brings destruction. Like a proper chief, it brings protection to the land, and it punishes those who are unethical in that it makes them afraid to overthrow righteousness; that is a proper warship. Continue reading

Announcing the new Hawaiian-language section of the Garden Island, 1912.

[Found under: “LEI MOKIHANA: Edited by J. M. Kaneakua and A. G. Kaulukou.”]

Something to Benefit the People

Because of the many requests that came to us to give some columns of the Garden Island newspaper in the Hawaiian language for the good and benefit of our fellow makaainana who do not know English [ike namu ole], therefore we agreed to those requests and are establishing LEI MOKIHANA Continue reading

English coverage of the marriage of Carrie Nakapuahi and Theophilus Metcalf Rowland, 1898.

ROWLAND—NAKAPUAHI.

A Very Pretty New Year’s Wedding in Puueo.

The marriage of Carrie K. Nakapuahi to Theo. M. Rowland last Sunday evening was a very happy event. Rev. S. L. Desha performed the ceremony using the beautiful service of the Episcopal Church. Continue reading

Another eulogy for William Hookano Iwiula, 1920.

Sometimes different newspapers will edit down submissions. Here is another version of the eulogy for William Hookano Iwiula, here given as William Hoomana Iwiula. This version is much more ornate and detailed. The editor of the Kuokoa probably was conserving space for other articles. Continue reading

On working together to accomplish a task that a few cannot do alone, 1866.

Work together.

“E alu like, work together” is what a man said to his grandchildren, as he greatly desired for them to work in the manner of the title of this outlook, saying, All the time you do things, work together, help one another. Look at a carriage with four driving horses; they all help each other, pulling all in one direction; that way the carriage moves quickly. If the horses did not pull in unison, then it is clear, the carriage will not go. Therefore, O Young ones, work together and help one another. Continue reading

We complain today? Kalaupapa, Waikolu, and Kalawao set aside, 1873.

Official Notifications.

Notice is hereby given, that from and after this date the Lands of Kalaupapa, Waikolu, and Kalauao, on the windward side of the Island of Molokai, set apart by the Board of Health for the isolation of Lepers, are strictly tabu, and all vessels are prohibited from touching or landing at either of them, except by special permission of the Board. Public attention is hereby called to Section 5 (A) of Chapter XXXIII of the Laws of 1870, to wit: Continue reading