Thanks for spreading the word about the awesomeness of the Hawaiian language newspapers!

I realize there have been no posts lately, but I have been taking a little break.

But today on the 10th anniversary since our first post(?!), I wanted to say thank you to those who have been spreading interest in the Hawaiian language newspapers. It is time that they are redigitized from the original newspapers, so an o is not confused with an e, or an m with a w, or a t with an l!

Queen Kapiʻolani’s motto was not, “Kūlia i kahi hiki.”

Kūlia i ka nuʻu.

I just saw Bishop Museum Press reprinted the Hawaiian and English Cross-Age Learning Picture Vocabulary Book, 2021.

What is New is Old, 2021 / 1938.

Did you see the announcement from Bishop Museum Press saying that the Hawaiian and English Cross-Age Learning Picture Vocabulary Book is back in print after a long time of not being available. For more information about the book and how to order copies for people you know, click the image below.

The reprint of the vocabulary book reminded me of an earlier column appearing in Hoku o Hawaii starting in 1938. It was called “He haawina i kekahi poe,” and was started to help people learn Hawaiian and to increase the number of subscriptions to the newspaper. This column would continue on until 4/19/1939. “Lesson in Hawaiian” followed from 4/26/1939 until 6/20/1945. Continue reading

I was asked once if other ethnicities put ads in Hawaiian language newspapers…

…I think if you wanted to sell your products, yes, you did.

 

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 39, Aoao 2. Feberuari 27, 1913.
The Hawaii Shokumin Shinbun, Number 484, September 6, 1912.
Hawaii Herald, Volume XVII, Number 22, Page 4. January 17, 1913.

On the first horses in Hawaii nei, 1852.

Who Brought the First Horses to the Islands?—In a valuable document presented by Stephen Reynolds, Esq., to the R. H. A. Society at its first meeting in 1850, the following passage occurs:—Horses.—I have not been able to find the name of him who introduced the first. It appears two were brought and presented to Kamehameha; the natives say Mr. Manine was in the vessel. Several were brought before 1823. From 1824 to 1838 many cargoes were brought from California. The horses born and reared on the islands are superior in all respects to those imported from California,—better limbs, better spirits, and tougher animals.” Continue reading

Animals introduced in Ka Lama Hawaii, 1834.

Pertaining to the Sloth [Hiamoe].

This strange animal is born and lives and dies amongst the branches of the trees. They are rare, and live in seclusion in the trees of the deep forests of South America. That is where it lives. Its front legs are long, somewhat like those of the arms of man, it does not reach a foot, its claws are long like fingers. Its hind legs are short. Therefore it cannot walk on land, it can only move by crawling. From that comes its name, the Sloth. Continue reading

What are you doing tomorrow at 2:00?

Papakilo Database on Hawaiian language newspapers!

If you are free tomorrow afternoon, check out the webinar on Hawaiian language newspapers put on by Papakilo Database and Awaiaulu. Click the image below to be taken to the registration page!

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fOxuRC5_QcyXB5Yex40Gkg

Vital Statistics, 1923.

MARRIAGES.

D. O. Mookini to Mary Hiram, Mar. 15.
Mahi Kekahaloa to Flora Waipa, Mar. 16.
Joseph Amana to Elizabeth Naeole, Mar. 17.
M. J. Rodrigues to Hattie Pupuhi, Mar. 17.
Fred K. Lee to Maria K. Kamai, Mar. 17.
J. R. Crawford to Abigail E. Voeler, Mar. 20.
Zerubabela Kapule to Kane Hanawahine, Mar. 21.
J. S. Chong to Annie Rose Kua, Mar. 24.
Homer J. Keller to Elizabeth Kaulia, Mar. 26. Continue reading

Death announcement for Zerubabela Kapule, aka Zakaria Kapule, 1923.

Did you see the Nūhou Monday post from Bishop Museum? Here is a obituary for Zerubabela Kapule who was also known as Zakaria [Zachariah].

Obituaries

ZERUBABELA KAPULE

Zerubabela Kapule, retired and pensioned member of the Hawaiian band, died last Thursday evening at his home, Continue reading