Praise for Kuhio in mele, 2021

Did you see yesterday’s Nuhou Monday post from Bishop Museum on praise for Prince Kuhio through mele? Check it out by clicking here!

What are you doing tomorrow at 2:00?

Papakilo Database on Hawaiian language newspapers!

If you are free tomorrow afternoon, check out the webinar on Hawaiian language newspapers put on by Papakilo Database and Awaiaulu. Click the image below to be taken to the registration page!

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fOxuRC5_QcyXB5Yex40Gkg

Vital Statistics, 1923.

MARRIAGES.

D. O. Mookini to Mary Hiram, Mar. 15.
Mahi Kekahaloa to Flora Waipa, Mar. 16.
Joseph Amana to Elizabeth Naeole, Mar. 17.
M. J. Rodrigues to Hattie Pupuhi, Mar. 17.
Fred K. Lee to Maria K. Kamai, Mar. 17.
J. R. Crawford to Abigail E. Voeler, Mar. 20.
Zerubabela Kapule to Kane Hanawahine, Mar. 21.
J. S. Chong to Annie Rose Kua, Mar. 24.
Homer J. Keller to Elizabeth Kaulia, Mar. 26. Continue reading

Death announcement for Zerubabela Kapule, aka Zakaria Kapule, 1923.

Did you see the Nūhou Monday post from Bishop Museum? Here is a obituary for Zerubabela Kapule who was also known as Zakaria [Zachariah].

Obituaries

ZERUBABELA KAPULE

Zerubabela Kapule, retired and pensioned member of the Hawaiian band, died last Thursday evening at his home, Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project at Bishop Museum, 2021.

Did you see the latest Nūhou Monday post from Bishop Museum? It mentions Ka Nūhou, the Hawaiian language newsletter put out by the club, Hui Aloha ʻĀina Tuahine at University of Hawaii at Mānoa. That was 49 years ago! Click here for the Nūhou Monday post from He Aupuni Palapala!

E na makua Hawaiʻi me na kupuna Hawaiʻi

…ʻO ʻoukou no na kumu helu ekahi o ka ʻolelo Hawaiʻi. Ka ʻolelo i aʻo ʻia mai ka puke mai, oʻohe no e like me ka ʻolelo mai koʻoukou waha mai.

Hawaiian parents and grandparents, you are the best teachers of the Hawaiian language.
The language taught from books is not like the language that comes from your mouths.
—A plea written by Haunani Bernardino, editor of Ka Nuhou, an English-Hawaiian newsletter.

Haunani Bernardino

Nuulani Atkins

Lurline Naone

Bill Wilson

By Arlene Lum
Star-Bulletinn Writer

Hawaiian is a living language and NOT a foreign one. And if a group of University of Hawaii students had their way, Hawaiian youngsters would be bilingual.

There are only 5,000 people in the State now who can speak the beautiful, musical language and only 150 at the University are trying to learn.

The reason?

“We were brought up feeling ashamed of our heritage,” according to Nuulani Atkins, a senior in his third year of language study. “I hated myself. I hated the Hawaiians. I felt inferior.” Continue reading

Revealing what was lost, 2021.

La Hanau

EDWIN M. DESHA

O Edwin M. Desha, ka  Lunanui o Ka Hoku o Hawaii, ke hoomanao ana i kona la hanau ma keia Poalima iho, Okakoba 18.

Mawaho ae o kona kulana he boki nui no ka Hoku, he kakauolelo o Mr. Desha na Lunahoomalu Samuel M. Spencer of ke Kalana o Hawaii. He lala ku maikai oia no ka hui Liona o Hilo, a pela nohoi me kekahi mau ahahui e ae. Ma kekahi olelo ana ae, he kanaka paa loa oia i ka hana a aole he loaa iaia ka manawa no ka lawe ana i kona hoomaha, a pela nohoi ma kona la hanau.

Me na upu maikai ana no ka la hanau hauoli e Eddie, mai ka papa pa’i holookoa o ka Hoku.

[Did you check out the new “Nūhou Monday” post out from Bishop Museum’s He Aupuni Palapala group? It talks about you can actually see a picture of Edwin M. Desha in the original of this newspaper! Click here to get taken to the page.

P.S. I am amused with the phrase “he boki nui”.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 10/16/1940, p. 1)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 25, Aoao 1. Okakoba 16, 1940.

Looking back to the Hawaiian football champions of 1895, 1926.

WINNERS OF FIRST MAINLAND — ISLAND GRID TILT

Here is the Honolulu team, island champions and victors over the Navy champs from Philadelphia. Top row, standing, left to right—Billie Cornwell, Chris Holt, Louis Singer. Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

What a disappointment, 1867.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Huikau.”]

It will not be seen after all.—We reported in Issue 4 of our Newspaper, “the moon will be eclipsed o n the 13th of September, and it will be seen here in Hawaii.” The Famous School Teacher of Punahou proclaimed to us that the moon will indeed be eclipsed on that day, Continue reading