Teach your children well, 1876.

Girl destroyed by fire.

O Lahui Hawaii: Aloha oe:—

In the morning of Friday, the 7th of July, a girl of 3 or 4 years old was burned up by fire. The reason she was burned up was because she took a match far from the house, like about 7 fathoms [7 anana], and then she immediately struck the match and her clothes was lit by the fire, and she soon felt the heat and ran to the house with the fire burning all over her body, it was then that her grandfather saw this, so he ran  and tore off the burning clothes, and when he saw what the fire did to her body, it was very dreadful, and from that time to 4 p. m., she died. Continue reading

Follow up to the Nihoa fire, 1885.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS.”]

The schooner Waiehu of the Pacific Navigation Company returned a few days ago from a special trip to the Island of Nihoa. When the schooner reached the Island she landed some twenty native passengers who remained on shore all night. Continue reading

Fire on Nihoa, 1885.

[Found under: “KA HUAKAI MAKAIKAI IA NIHOA.”]

The Alii Liliuokalani enjoyed seeing the sitting young birds of all sorts. The alii climbed the ridges and descended the valleys until reaching an area where Loulu trees leaves grew deep green.  The Alii found comfort under its shade along with some of the people who got there. When the Alii was in repose, our famous photographer J. Williams was lively at work taking photographs [hoolele aka]. The Alii Liliuokalani ate her lunch upon the twisted surface of this Island. After the meal, the Alii made ready to return to the lee of Nihoa, and some others turned back as well. At that time the whistle of the ship was heard calling to everyone to return to the ship. Continue reading

Punishment by God? 1893.

REGRETTABLE.

We received this letter below, and we were filled with pity for this tragedy encountered by our fellow man, and this is that letter:

“Hana, June 16, 1893.

“Aloha to you, O Fearless Holomua;

“Here is some news from here in the country.

“On the 31st of May, the home of J. K. Iosepa was consumed by fire; destroyed were the belongings inside of the house, the furnishings, the bed and other things, and the walls were burned, but the house remained standing as if it is made ready.

Continue reading