Teach your children well, 1876.

Girl destroyed by fire.

O Lahui Hawaii: Aloha oe:—

In the morning of Friday, the 7th of July, a girl of 3 or 4 years old was burned up by fire. The reason she was burned up was because she took a match far from the house, like about 7 fathoms [7 anana], and then she immediately struck the match and her clothes was lit by the fire, and she soon felt the heat and ran to the house with the fire burning all over her body, it was then that her grandfather saw this, so he ran  and tore off the burning clothes, and when he saw what the fire did to her body, it was very dreadful, and from that time to 4 p. m., she died. Continue reading

Follow up to the Nihoa fire, 1885.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS.”]

The schooner Waiehu of the Pacific Navigation Company returned a few days ago from a special trip to the Island of Nihoa. When the schooner reached the Island she landed some twenty native passengers who remained on shore all night. Continue reading

Fire on Nihoa, 1885.

[Found under: “KA HUAKAI MAKAIKAI IA NIHOA.”]

The Alii Liliuokalani enjoyed seeing the sitting young birds of all sorts. The alii climbed the ridges and descended the valleys until reaching an area where Loulu trees leaves grew deep green.  The Alii found comfort under its shade along with some of the people who got there. When the Alii was in repose, our famous photographer J. Williams was lively at work taking photographs [hoolele aka]. The Alii Liliuokalani ate her lunch upon the twisted surface of this Island. After the meal, the Alii made ready to return to the lee of Nihoa, and some others turned back as well. At that time the whistle of the ship was heard calling to everyone to return to the ship. Continue reading

Punishment by God? 1893.

REGRETTABLE.

We received this letter below, and we were filled with pity for this tragedy encountered by our fellow man, and this is that letter:

“Hana, June 16, 1893.

“Aloha to you, O Fearless Holomua;

“Here is some news from here in the country.

“On the 31st of May, the home of J. K. Iosepa was consumed by fire; destroyed were the belongings inside of the house, the furnishings, the bed and other things, and the walls were burned, but the house remained standing as if it is made ready.

Continue reading

Rosalia Tripp saved, 1866.

Nearly burned up by fire.—On Christmas night, last Tuesday, after the candles were lit to light the chapel, a flame of one of the candles began to burn the clothes of a girl of the Choir, her name being Rosalia Tripp. The fire did not put much effort into its work, when it was put out by someone who was standing there.

(Au Okoa, 12/31/1866, p. 2)

AuOkoa_12_31_1866_2.png

Ke Au Okoa, Buke II, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 31, 1866.

A fire to celebrate the birthday of Kamehameha V? 1868.

Commotion-Inciting Fire.—The fire bells of Honolulu rang out in the evening of this past Friday, and off went the firemen; come to find out, the fire was the work of Miss Bingham folk. The large fire that they set was purportedly to honor the birthday of the King. If this was done with good intentions, why were the members of the fire department not informed prior to this? We saw in the P. C. A. paper a clarification of their apology to the fire department; Continue reading

Curious report, 1868.

Alarm of Fire on Friday Evening.—Some young men, with more love of fun than discretion, made a bon-fire of some combustible materials in an open space makai of Kawaiahao. The bright light very naturally caused people in town to think there was a serious fire, and on the alarm being given, the Fire Department turned out with its usual promptitude, and ran towards the supposed conflagration, until it was ascertained to be a false alarm. As No. 2 was rushing along through Palace Walk with all speed on, the foreman, Mr. James McGuire, accidentally fell, and came near being run over. As it was, his trumpet was smashed under the wheels. Had he been killed, what regrets of these young men would have availed to compensate for the results of their thoughtlessness. Our fireman, or at least the heads of the department, should always be notified beforehand of any such bonfire demonstration, otherwise we may be some night in the position of the boy that cried “wolf! wolf!” when there was no wolf, and when the danger really came, nobody would pay any attention to his cries for help.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 12/16/1868, p. 3)

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Hawaiian Gazette, Volume IV, Number 48, Page 3. December 16, 1868.