Important events occurring in June, 1873.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Important days in June.—June 5, 1870, a large fire in Constantinople [Konatinopela], destroying 7000 houses. Continue reading

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Punishment by God? 1893.

REGRETTABLE.

We received this letter below, and we were filled with pity for this tragedy encountered by our fellow man, and this is that letter:

“Hana, June 16, 1893.

“Aloha to you, O Fearless Holomua;

“Here is some news from here in the country.

“On the 31st of May, the home of J. K. Iosepa was consumed by fire; destroyed were the belongings inside of the house, the furnishings, the bed and other things, and the walls were burned, but the house remained standing as if it is made ready.

Continue reading

Rosalia Tripp saved, 1866.

Nearly burned up by fire.—On Christmas night, last Tuesday, after the candles were lit to light the chapel, a flame of one of the candles began to burn the clothes of a girl of the Choir, her name being Rosalia Tripp. The fire did not put much effort into its work, when it was put out by someone who was standing there.

(Au Okoa, 12/31/1866, p. 2)

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Ke Au Okoa, Buke II, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 31, 1866.

A fire to celebrate the birthday of Kamehameha V? 1868.

Commotion-Inciting Fire.—The fire bells of Honolulu rang out in the evening of this past Friday, and off went the firemen; come to find out, the fire was the work of Miss Bingham folk. The large fire that they set was purportedly to honor the birthday of the King. If this was done with good intentions, why were the members of the fire department not informed prior to this? We saw in the P. C. A. paper a clarification of their apology to the fire department; Continue reading

Curious report, 1868.

Alarm of Fire on Friday Evening.—Some young men, with more love of fun than discretion, made a bon-fire of some combustible materials in an open space makai of Kawaiahao. The bright light very naturally caused people in town to think there was a serious fire, and on the alarm being given, the Fire Department turned out with its usual promptitude, and ran towards the supposed conflagration, until it was ascertained to be a false alarm. As No. 2 was rushing along through Palace Walk with all speed on, the foreman, Mr. James McGuire, accidentally fell, and came near being run over. As it was, his trumpet was smashed under the wheels. Had he been killed, what regrets of these young men would have availed to compensate for the results of their thoughtlessness. Our fireman, or at least the heads of the department, should always be notified beforehand of any such bonfire demonstration, otherwise we may be some night in the position of the boy that cried “wolf! wolf!” when there was no wolf, and when the danger really came, nobody would pay any attention to his cries for help.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 12/16/1868, p. 3)

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Hawaiian Gazette, Volume IV, Number 48, Page 3. December 16, 1868.