Hawaiian naval flag? 1887.

THE HAWAIIAN NAVY FLAG.

The Hawaiian Navy flag, from a design by Mrs. Strong, contains in the center, on a white back ground, a gold crown resting on a yellow shield. The shield contains a white tabu stick [puloulou], crossed by two red kahilis, Continue reading

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Commentary on Hawaiian Music and Liliu’s “Mele Lahui Hawaii,” 1867.

Hawaiian Music.—It is something to hear of Hawaiians, who but a few years ago, as a nation, possessed no other songs but the semi-barbarous Meles of their ancestors, and no other music than the montonous “ah—ah,——o—oo—u—uu,” of former years,—it is something pleasingly new to have to note the appearance of a neatly lithographed sheet of music for sale in the bookstore, both the words and music of which were composed by a Hawaiian lady. The title describes the sentiments expressed in the composition—”He Mele Lahui Hawaii,” or, in English, “A Hawaiian National Hymn.” The words are not rhyme, but read smoothly, with the euphony characteristic of the Hawaiian tongue, and the music is very sweet, the first few bars resembling those of the popular song of “Hazel Dell.” When sung by a full choir of natives, many of whom, male and female, have well managed voices of peculiar sweetness of tone, the “National Hymn,” expressing as it does both piety and patriotism, cannot fail to become popular. The lithography is very creditably done at Newcomb & Co’s book-bindery. We subjoin a translations of the words:

Almighty Father, bend thine ear,
And list the nation’s prayer,
That lowly bows before thy throne,
And seeks thy fostering care.
Grant thy peace throughout the land,
O’er each sunny sea-girt isle;
Keep the nation’s life, O Lord,
And upon our Sovereign smile. Continue reading

Expenditures of the Board of Genealogy, 1884.

Found under: “General Report of The Finance Committee to the Legislative Assembly of 1884.”]

BOARD OF GENEALOGY.

The appropriation of $10,000 for the Relief of the Board of Genealogy has all been drawn from the Treasury upon warrants by the Minister of the Interior, and the books of the department show the following persons to have been the recipients:

Her Ex. the Governess of Hawaii [Poomaikelani] ….. $6,474.37 Continue reading

Was Emalia Kaihumua not Sweet Emalia? 1906.

WIFE BEATER’S WORK UNCOVERS A SUSPECT

Emalia Kaihumua, a sister of “Sweet” Emalia, whose record with the police extends over a number of years, was severely beaten by her husband yesterday, her jaw being broken with a demijohn. The injured woman was brought to the police station, and she was given medical treatment. Continue reading

Great Meeting of December 28, 1891 at Manamana, 1891.

MASS MEETING.

The Native Sons of Hawaii to the Front.

RESOLUTIONS AGAINST A REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENT ADOPTED.

Over six hundred people, Hawaiians and foreigners, were present at the mass meeting called by the Native Sons of Hawaii, and held at the Gymnasium on Monday evening. Many prominent natives were present and listened to the discourses of their wise leaders with attentive ears. Long before 7 o’clock streams of people were seen wending their way towards the Gymnasium. The Royal Hawaiian Band, under the leadership of Prof. D. K. Naone, was stationed on the makai end of the hall, and discoursed most eloquent music for over thirty minutes.

J. K. Kaulia, the Secretary of the Native Sons of Hawaii, called the meeting to order at 7:45 p. m.

Hon. A. Rosa was elected chairman of the meeting. On taking the chair, he said that he came as spectator only. He was not a candidate for the coming elections, and he was not a member of the society. He asked the audience to conduct the meting in an orderly manner, so that nothing would mar the success of the object in view.

Isaac D. Iaea was chosen secretary and Mr. Rosa interpreted the speeches in English.

The Chairman called upon the Rev. J. Waiamau to open the meeting with prayer which was done.

A. Rosa said: The subject for discussion this evening is, “Our denunciation against adopting a Republican for of Government for Hawaii.” You are at liberty to express your views, whether pro or con. The first speaker—J. L. Kaulukou—will speak against the Republican movement. The time allotted to each speaker is limited to ten minutes.

J. L. Kaulukou—Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: We are assembled here to-night because false rumors are being propagated abroad that we, native sons of the soil of Hawaii, are in favor of a Republican form of Government. Our bitterest enemies are doing their utmost to spread this unfounded report. It is our duty tonight at a mass meeting assembled, to notify the world at large that the aboriginal Hawaiians are body and soul against such a movement. We do not favor annexation either with America or with any other foreign power. We have called this meeting because foreigners abroad are entertaining this idea, which is most derogatory to our interests. Hawaiians are not the only one concerned in this question; foreigners, too, who have adopted Hawaii as their home; they have a right to stand up and denounce this movement. [Applause.[ A queen now reigns over us. It is our duty as loyal citizens to do our utmost to perpetuate the throne of Hawaii. England cherishes her Queen, and we should adore our Queen. Our ancestors have been accustomed to a monarchial form of government, and we, the younger generations, have been instilled with undying loyalty to our sovereign. Our forefathers considered “love of the throne, love of country and love of the people” as one, but we have divided it into three distinct persons. I will now read to you the following resolutions, carefully prepared by a committee of the Native Sons of Hawaii: Continue reading

Remembering Jules Dudoit, 1866.

The Late Julius Dudoit, Esq.

Seldom does the historian of passing events have a sadder task to perform than when penning obituary notices of his contemporaries; but when the subject of his notice is a person of mark,—of innocent and upright character,—the victim of a dastardly assassin; it becomes a melancholy duty to lay a last mark of esteem upon the tomb of the outraged, especially when venerable for age, and honorable for past services. Continue reading

Might these be the feathers the Hawaiians were wearing in Salt Lake City? 1898.

CORSETS, HATS AND JEWELRY.

Some Late Fashion Hints—Philadelphia Physician Shows Women How to Lace.

A NEW PARIS COAT.

IBIS FEATHERS.

The promises of May are already being made, and tender hearts who will not have the plumage or bodies of dead songsters in their hats can this spring trim the hats with lovely ibis feathers that cost no avian lives, and are fair to look upon. Of course the purple ibis feathers from Egypt are to be classed among the costly beauties of millinery, but we have our own American scarlet ibis to borrow tail feathers from and fix in our new wide-brimmed hats.

This delicate plumage is, however, dyed many handsome colors, and, beside this and ostrich feathers, to be safely adopted by any Audubonite, we are going to have lovely hats later on trimmed so gracefully and economically with nothing but masses of shot taffeta silk cut on the bias and every edge closely pinked. This piece silk will assume, in fact, has already largely taken the place of ribbon bows for the trimming of simpler hats. Nothing can be more alluringly daring than a sapphire blue felt, with just a yard of cerise taffeta twisted about the crown, perky bows and ends starting up in every direction. Here and there the taffeta was caught down with cheap pins set with mock sapphires and rhinestones.

Nobody yet dares to assume which ways hats are going to tilt for spring wearing, but just in this midseason a tendency is making toward piling everything in front. Thake a look, for instance, at the crowning glory on the head of the model in the braided coat. It is typical of the daring frontage now used. Here the hat brim is of modes proportions; it is the mounting black and white ostrich tips that lend the stately effect. Another hat worth mentioning boasted a brim four and one-half inches wide, and this was turned directly off the face, bent into three perpendicular flutes, and over the edge of the brim, finished by puffings of black chiffon, nodded the heavy heads of half a dozen prize tall feathers.

(Salt Lake Hearld, 1/16/1898, p. 15)

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(The Salt Lake Herald, Number 49, Page 15. January 16, 1898.