Road to hell is paved with gold, 1915.

GIVES UP PLAN TO RESTORE OLD HAWAII TEMPLES

C. R. Forbes Warned from Undertaking by John G. Stokes; Will Put Up Markers

Plans that Charles R. Forbes, superintendent of public works, has had for the restoration of the heiaus on Hawaii will probably be abandoned as a result of a letter received by him recently from John G. Stokes, curator at the Bishop museum.

Mr. Stokes objects to having the heiaus built up again to a semblance of their original shape, as was the plan proposed by Superintendent Forbes, by taking rock that had fallen and resetting it in its old position. Mr. Stokes’ contention is that this would be an unwise thing to do, even in the interest of preserving the old relics. His statement is made after a careful study of them. Continue reading

Queen Liliuokalani at La Kuokoa celebration, 1896.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.”]

J. K. Kaulia, president-elect of the Hui Aloha Aina, entertained the delegates and other friends at his residence on Saturday. The Hawaiian flag was in evidence, and also hoisted on the new flag staff for the first time in recognition  of Independence. Queen Liliuokalani was present.

(Independent, 11/30/1896, p. 3)

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The Independent, Volume III, Number 444, Page 3. November 30, 1896.

Norrie-Mcgrew decision, 1893.

Norrie and the Star.

On Saturday morning Judge Foster gave his ruling on the demurer interposed by the defendant in the Norrie-McGrew libel case. It was in favor of Norrie. Judge Hartwell immediately appealed to the Supreme Court. Later in the day A. P. Peterson, the attorney for the complainant, notified the court that the case would not be prosecuted so it has been dropped from the calendar.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 6/6/1893, p. 9)

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Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXVIII, Number 23, Page 9. June 6, 1893.

Royalists and Annexationists and libel, 1893.

CAME TO BLOWS.

Annexationists and Royalists Have a Little Set-to.

There was a small-sized row between six Annexationists and twenty Royalists in the Merchants’ Exchange saloon Saturday night. Norrie, a Royalist hanger-on of the Holomua, got the contents of a spitoon, while Ned Thomas, the “anatomist,” got a beer mug along side the head.

(Hawaiian Star, 5/29/1893, p. 5)

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The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 54, Page 5. May 29, 1893.

Well before John L. Stevens aids in the overthrow of the Kingdom, look at what is printed in his own newspaper in Maine! 1892.

AMERICA’S OPPORTUNITY IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN.

Shall the Key to the Pacific Ocean Pass Into British Hands?

[From the Daily Kennebec Journal.]

It is an accepted truism that nations, as well as individuals, have their opportunities and duties, and that the neglect of them, through indolence or cowardice, surely brings retribution in one form or another.

The States and Territories which outlet on the vast Western ocean will some day have a population of one hundred and fifty millions of souls. This Pacific side of the American republic, stretching from north Alaska to south California, a coast line of four thousand miles, without including the seventeen hundred miles of shore line of Puget Sound, is to have a development of agricultural, lumber, fisheries, and mineral riches, out of which will flow streams of  commerce, which neither the imagination nor cold figures can well cover at the present time.

In the front of these vast Pacific States extends the immense ocean of the Pacific. Across this vast Pacific plain must be for all time the water roads along which will move the commerce of many hundreds of millions of people. Anchored firmly between the two great oceans, America divides with Europe the commerce of the Atlantic, Europe having the advantage by numbers, position, and prestige. But on the great Western ocean America can easily take the lead and hold it securely against all competitors. To do this she must improve her opportunities. Sloth and cowardice never win anything worth having. Time waits neither for individuals nor nations. Success is for those who dare. Continue reading

John L. Stevens represents Hawaii in America, 1893.

STEVENS AND HAWAII.

The Ex-Minister Points Out the Advantage of Annexation.

AMERICAN INTEREST LEAD

An Address Before San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, Which Passes Resolution Favoring Annexation.

San Francisco, June 1.—Hon. John L. Stevens, ex-United States minister at Hawaii, addressed the Chamber of Commerce of this city to-day on the subject of “Hawaiian Affairs and Their Relation to the Interest of the United States.” A large number of businessmen were present and gave the speaker an appreciative reception. At the close of the address a resolution was adopted favoring the speedy annexation of the islands. Mr. Stevens, in relating his first impressions upon the islands, said he had not been long in Honolulu before he perceived how thoroughly an American city it was and how predominating were all American interests on the islands. Continuing he said:

He had found an intelligent body of citizens of American and European origin supporting a semi-barbaric monarchy, dead in everything but its vices; coarsely luxuriant in its tastes and wishes and spreading social and political demoralization througout the island.

The speaker then related several incidents in the career of the deposed queen, and charges her not only with personal immorality, but also with having by unconstitutional and arbitrary methods, secured the adoption of certain measures, such as the opium and lottery bills, and recited her attempt to promulgate a new constitution, which finally aroused the respectable element of the community to action. Mr. Stevens then reviewed in detail the circumstances of the revolution and overthrow of the queen last January, and the subsequent establishment of the provisional government. He spoke of the danger of riot and incendiarism at the time of the revolution, the fact that there was no adequate police power in Honolulu, and that an appeal was accordingly made for the landing of men from the United States ship Boston. In this connection, Mr. Stevens said in part:

Under the diplomatic and naval rules, the United States minister and naval commander would have shamefully ignored their duty had they not landed men from the Boston for the security of American life and property and the maintenance of public order, even had the committee of public safety not requested the United States to do so. The Boston’s men stepped not an inch from the line of duty; they never lifted a finger in aid of the fallen monarchy on the rising of the provisional government and all assertions to the contrary, by whomsoever uttered, are audacious falsehoods.

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King Kalakaua’s 50th birthday celebration, with detailed tour of Iolani Palace, 1886.

THE KING’S BIRTHDAY.

The Palace Decorated for the Festivities.

Changes in the Pictures and Decorations Which Bring Out the Ancient History of the People.

In view of the festivities which commence this morning in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the natal day of His Majesty the King, Iolani Palace has undergone extensive preparations, the arrangements for the reception and entertainment of the guests being very complete. The balconies are bedecked in bunting embodying in bold and striking designs the colors of the Royal Standard. The principal entrance hall has been richly caparisoned at the hands of the upholsterer. Its walls have been newly hung with the valuable oil paintings, representing in life size the line of Hawaiian Sovereigns, with their consorts, from the time of Kamehameha I, downwards. The first position on the right is occupied by the portrait of the Conqueror, whose reign marked so momentous and epoch in the history of the Kingdom, and whose genius has so largely influenced its destiny. Side by side with this is the portrait of Kekauluohi, mother of King Lunalilo. Next are those of Kmehameha II and Queen Kaumaulii [Kamamalu ?]; Kamehameha III and Queen Kalama. On the left are arranged the portraits of Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma; Kamehameha V and King Lunalilo. The niches in the intervening spaces are each filled with some choice fern or other horticultural specimen. The general effect is extremely pleasing to the eye.

The throne room, in which the receptions will take place, has been newly furnished with a rich crimson carpet. On either side of the dais are suspended the Royal Orders of Kamehameha, Kalakaua, Kapiolani and the Crown of Hawaii, whilst the walls on every side are adorned with the numerous foreign decorations with which His Majesty has from time to time been invested. Each one is enclosed in a gilt oval frame, surmounted with the Royal Arms of the particular nation or empire to which the Order belongs. Leaving the throne room and crossing the central hall, one passes into the Blue room . The first object that meets the eye is a striking portrait of His Majesty in the uniform of the King’s Guard, with decorations. Facing this, to the right of the doorway, is one of Her Majesty the Queen, whilst on the left is a full length life size representation of Louis XIV of France, a work of rare value. The two former are from the brush of Charles Hasselmann. Among the many ornaments and curios is a set of vases in Benares brass ware, from India. To the rear of this apartment is the spacious dining hall, in which are displayed the massive silver table ware, each article bearing the Royal Arms in colored enamel. The furniture is early English in style, whilst some choice works of art adorns the walls. The latter include a portrait of Kamehameha IV, taken during the monarch’s boyhood, a companion pair of Napoleon I and IV, taken during that monarch’s boyhood, a companion pair of Napoleon I and Blucher; Admiral Thomas, who restored the country; the Czar Alexander II of Russia, and a graphic delineation of the crater of Kilauea by night, painted by Furneaux.

Ascending the grand staircase the upper hall is next entered, wherein the King’s Privy Council of State is usually held. The central figure is a bust in bronze of His Majesty the King; oil paintings and tasteful cabinets, containing articles of vertu,are disposed on either side, while the hall, which runs the entire width of the building, commands a magnificent vista of Pauoa Valley, the mountains, tier behind tier, with the different hues forming an effective background. The front window overlooks the Aliiolani Hale, and affords a distant view of the sea.

The private apartments of His Majesty lead off from the upper hall, and are located on the left, or Ewa, side of the Palace. In the front is the music room, in which the heavy style of furniture is discarded for a lighter and more appropriate one, the appointments being in excellent taste. In the room are a set of half a dozed water color drawings of special historic interest. They are illustrative of island scenes at a period prior to the advent of civilization, among which are representations of the large double canoes carrying the ancient idols; the heiaus or temples, both open and closed; grass houses, etc. These pictures are enlargements by R. C. Barnfield, after the originals taken on the spot by Captain Kotzbue, the Russian author of “Voyages in the Pacific.”

At the further end, facing the entrance, is a speaking likeness of Her Majesty the Queen, life size, in oil, by Furneaux. The room also contains a very fine painting of the crater of Kilauea, by Tavernier; a Belgian Princess, a daughter of the present King, together with cabinet photographs of Sir John and Lady Franklin. Less obtrusive, but of considerable interest, is a study in music, framed in a peculiarly chaste and unique manner.

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