How bad leaders and their advisers were dealt with in Kaʻū, 1890.

INCIDENTS IN HAWAIIAN HISTORY.

Before Kamehameha the First had reduced the island of Hawaii to his subjection the various districts were ruled over by petty kings or high chiefs. Anecdotes of three of these aliis who successively ruled over the large district of Kau, are still current among the natives. They are not mythical, but actual events.

Koihala the alii of Kau was about making a voyage from Kona to Kau in his fleet of canoes. He sent word to his people of Kau to meet him with supplies of food on a certain day at Kapua.

The people cooked hogs, dogs and potatoes and prepared poi, water in calabashes and other supplies in sufficient quantities for the chief and his retainers, and started afoot with their burdens to meet him. On arriving at Kapua the fleet came along but did not stop. The alii called to the people ashore to go back to the next landing towards South Point. They resumed their burdens and retraced their steps to this place, the king proceeding by sea. At this place they were told to go on still further to another landing. This was repeated several times and they were finally told to climb the steep pali and meet the king at Kaalualu around and east of South Point. The people were tired, foot sore and hungry from their wearisome travel over the lava and determined upon a different reception to their alii from what he expected. They said “we will teach these chiefs a lesson not to wear us out with their capricious whims. We are hungry and we will eat the food and give him another article of diet instead.” So they sat down and ate up the food and filled the ti-leaf containers with stones and proceeded to near the coast and sat on a slight hill to await the coming of the chief and his party. He landed and proceeded up the ascent to receive his hookupu (tribute of food). When near, the people stood up and, taking the stones from the containers, threw them at the king and his retainers saying, “Here is your pig,” “Here is your dog,” “Here are your potatoes,” etc., and Koihala was killed. The stone, a short way on the road from Kaalualu to Waiohinu is still pointed out as the exact spot where Koihala—the exacting tyrant—met his death. Continue reading

Advertisements

First Jewish Wedding in Hawaii, 1879.

Marriage Ceremony.—On Tuesday evening the 22d inst., at the residence of the bride’s uncle, M. Louisson, Esq., of Honolulu, Mr. J. Hyman of thi mercantile firm of Hyman Brothers, of this city, was married to Miss B. Frankel, niece of Mr. and Mrs. M. Louisson, in the presence of a very large company of invited guests, composing the elite of Honolulu. Everything that tae te could suggest or money procure, was furnished for the pleasure of the company. Mr. Louisson’s spacious and elegant mansion was arranged with consummate taste and liberality, and everything connected with it gotten up in the best of style. Outside the main building was erected a booth, draped with evergreens, tropical flowers, and the national flags of the United States, Hawaii and the German Empire, which gave a charming effect to the scene. The verandas and booth were brilliantly illuminated with Chinese lanterns and tastefully decorated, giving it the finest effect. In the booth was spread for the accommodation of the guests, who numbered about 200, a most sumptuous repast, gotten up under the superintendence of Mr. Herbert of the Hawaiian Hotel. At precisely 8 o’clock, the hour fixed, the bride and bridegroom filed into the parlor, where the guests were assembled, and Mr. Peck, a Hebrew and friend of the parties, who was deputized by the Jewish Rabbi at San Francisco, to perform the marriage ceremony according to the Hebrew formula which he did in the Hebrew tongue by reading from a book. The ceremony was short and solemnly performed by Mr. Peck, who concluded by pronouncing them man and wife, according to the Jewish as well as Hawaiian law. After Mr. Peck had concluded, the Rev. Dr. Damon stepped forward and presented the bride with the marriage certificate, prefacing the fact with a few appropri- and very happy remarks. Continue reading

Were they really eating loli thinking it was clams? 1909.

PROGRAM OF THE BIG ‘TISER LUAU

Here is the program for the big luau at the Peninsula tomorrow. The ‘Tiser special train will leave the depot at 8:35 pronto. All employes of the Hawaiian Gazette Company please take notice and get there on time. What, ho, you luau.

Program for the day. Committees on picnic and luau, G. G. Boisse, chairman.

Luau and transportation, Charles S. Crane, S. P. Correa; games, C. S. Crane, E. Dekum, L. H. Mesick, Jack Densham, John Traut; dance, Paul Pereira; program and printing, L. H. Mesick, G. J. Boisse; official photographer, James Williams; Music, J. Kupau; refreshments, George Seyde.

Immediately upon arriving on the grounds there will be a match game of baseball between the following teams for a valuable trophy:

Hot Slugs—H. Chillingworth; p; L. Soares, c; Alfred Williams (captain), 1b; H. Williams, 2b; S. Saffery, ss; H. Herrick, 3b; James Ii, cf; F. Correa, 1f; G. J. Boisse, rf.

Substitutes—C. Estep, M. Guerrero, C. Lutz, A. Wolff, E. Souza, A. L. Eakin.

Wrong Fonts—J. Williams (captain), p; Che Bui Farm, c; Paul Pereira, 1b; L. Makanani, 2b; J. Kupau, ss; M. Pimenta, 3b; J. Pereira, cf; G. L. Samson, rf; G. Pereira, 1f.

Substitutes—E. Pihi, E. M. Thompson, Charles S. Crane, John Traut, S. P. Correa.

Jack Densham, umpire.

A. P. Taylor, official scorer.

After the baseball game the following games will be pulled off. Events are free for all. Valuable prizes for the winners:

  1. Girls’ race.
  2. Three-legged race.
  3. Fat men’s race.
  4. Fat women’s race.
  5. Men’s race, running backwards; 50 yards.
  6. Boys’ race, under 9 years.
  7. Girls’ race, under 9 years.
  8. Boys’ race, between 9 and 14 years.
  9. Boys’ race, over 14 years.
  10. Children’s races, boys and girls.
  11. Married men’s race.
  12. Married women’s race.
  13. Poi eating match for Hawaiians.
  14. Poi eating match for Haoles.

Intermission for luau. Continue reading

Kupopolo Heiau and more, 1906.

SEEKING MORE HEIAU DATA

Mr. T. G. Thrum hopes to set out on another heiau search on this island the early part of next week, leaving perhaps on Tuesday for Waianae to Locate and investigate the principal ancient temples of that district, and gather such data relative thereto as may be obtainable at this late date, then pass on beyond Waimea to revisit for further examination the famous heaiau of Oahu, “Puu o Mahuka,” Continue reading

More on Kupopolo Heiau, 1905.

MOVE FOR RESTORATION OF HEIAU OF KUPOPOLO

A Committee From the Historical Society Views the Ruins Under the Escort of the Promotion Committee.

(BY SOL. N. SHERIDAN.)

Did it ever fall to your lot to go on a personally conducted excursion in quest of an old Hawaiian Heiau, or temple of worship? That has fallen to my lot—and it was a most pleasantly conducted excursion. It was conducted by Mr. E. M. Boyd, Secretary of the Promotion Committee, and Mr. Fred. C. Smith, General Passenger Agent of the Oahu Railway Company, and two more efficient conductors are seldom sent out in charge of one small party. The excursion, which took place yesterday, came  about in this way: A little time ago, Mr. Thomas G. Thrum, antiquarian and historian, came upon the ruins of an old Hawaiian heathen temple at a point about four miles beyond the Haleiwa Hotel, and within plain sight from the railway and the public road. This was, in many ways, a most remarkable find. It is perhaps the closest heiau to Honolulu, since the destruction of the one at Moiliili, and the wonder is that it had been lost to knowledge so long. In fact, it would not, perhaps, save for the fact that it has been taken all these years for a cattle pen. Indeed, from the line of the railway and from the public road, too, it does look precisely like a cattle pen lying back against the steep slope of the hill.

FINDING THE TEMPLE.

But, when Mr. Thrum made known the facts of his find, of course the interest of all concerned with Hawaiian antiquities was aroused. The Historical Society members talked of the matter, and the Promotion Committee took the thing up. A heathen temple of the old days, a genuine antique, was worth while as a tourist asset. And out of this various interest in the matter grew the personally conducted excursion of yesterday over the Oahu railway.

For if the heiau was to be preserved, it was essential that experts should be consulted upon its preservation. No experts could be so well advised as to the proper steps to take as those of the Historical Society. Nobody had a more legitimate interest in bringing these experts to view the heiau than the Promotion Committee. Therefore, Mr. Fred Smith was called into the consultation, and Mr. Boyd sent out his invitations for the personally conducted excursion.

REPRESENTATIVE GATHERING.

All those who had been invited could not go, unfortunately, but the gathering was representative. In the party were Dr. Sereno E. Bishop, Dr. N. B. Emerson, Thomas G. Thrum, Prof. William Alason Bryan, assistant curator at Bishop’s Museum, President Griffith of Oahu College, E. S. Dodge of the Bishop Estate and W. W. Hall, Treasurer of the Historical Society. The party gathered at the Oahu Railway Station, and was whirled away down the road, in a private car and a drizzle of rain. The car was most comfortable, having an observation platform and cosy chairs and all the comforts that go with modern railway travel. The drizzle of rain was not at all uncomfortable, serving to cool the air of what might otherwise have been a hot day, but it did not give promise for a successful excursion for purposes of observation. Which only goes to show that the weather is uncertain, even in Hawaii, for while the sun shone at not time during the day, the rain presently went away mauka, and the day became perfect for the purposes of the expedition. If it had been made to order, it could not have been better.

DOWN THE ROAD.

Away and away through the rice fields and the kiawe thickets that lie on this side of Pearl City, the special train sped fast, riding as smoothly as it might hav done on one of the big mainland railroads. You may not have noticed that the Oahu road is perfectly ballasted, and in fine order, and that its trains run with little jar at high speed. But that is the fact. Past the wide cane fields of Ewa and Oahu, and the sisal plantation, the train rushed onward, and around the mountains that come down close to the line at Waianae. They are rugged hills, opening back into a succession of beautiful valleys at the far heads of which tower cliffs serried with waterways dropping straight down, it seems for thousands of feet. And on the other hand, is the blue sea. It was a still sea, yesterday, until Kaena Point was passed. Then the rollers came dashing in upon the rocks.

ALL MEET AS EQUALS.

Still on and on sped the train, and presently the cliffs fell back for the land of Waialua and, with a sugar mill in the background, there appeared the little white targets that mark the holes of the Haleiwa golf course. The train rushed by the depot at Waialua, to the amazed wonder of a lot of little Japs and Chinese and native children, and the evident amusement of a couple of very bright looking small haole boys, who waved their hands and smiled at us, on the observation platform of the special.

“Some of your caddies?” I said to Mr. Boyd.

“Not at all. One of those boys plays a very good game of golf,” replied the Secretary of the Promotion Committee in a tone of grave respect.

I don’t know that anybody has ever said that in the love of a sport the grown up and the little chap meet on a common level, but it is true.

THE GORGE OF WAIMEA.

Past the Haleiwa, too, our train rushed, and in a few minutes we saw the Heiau of Kupopolo over against the precipitous hill on the left of the track, looking exactly like a cattle pen in the distance. But we went on past it. Mr. Fred Smith desired to show his guests the beautiful gorge through which Waimea steam breaks to the sea, and the train was run to the middle of the bridge across the river. It is a wonderful gorge, wild and beautiful, and the glimpse of the valley further up is one of the best scenic bits on this island of Oahu. The stream is beautiful, too, and yesterday it was especially fine, a tawny flood pouring into the ocean a mass of water that discolored the sea for several miles. Upon the high bluff, just across this stream, are the ruins of the temple of the priests, with which ruins are associated that old tale of the massacre of the Daedelus men. You will read all about that in the histories.

THE TEMPLE PROPER.

The train was then run back to the Heiau that we had come to see, or that the antiquarians in the party had come to see that they might discuss its restoration intelligently, and the party left the car and made its way up the slope to the old temple.

It was a walk, perhaps, of a little less than an eighth of a mmile, climbing a gentle slope all the way. Truly those old Hawaiians chose sightly places to worship in. From the temple, the countryside sweeps away to the southward in a long stretch that would joy the soul of a painter. The sea is in front, and to the northward, where the mountain range runs down to the water, there is a variation of the prospect that is pleasing.

The Heiau, so far as any living person knows, is one of which there is no record in Hawaiian tradition. It had a local name, “Kupopolo,” but no special significance attaches to that. It is a large double structure, as shown in the diagram herewith prepared by Mr. Thrum. It lies as nearly as can be ascertained by a pocket compass, north and south in its greatest dimension, the peculiar entrance being on the northwestern corner. The temple faces west. The entrance—there is trace of but one—was a narrow way, apparently, between two walls of stone masonry. Continue reading

Hawaiian naval flag? 1887.

THE HAWAIIAN NAVY FLAG.

The Hawaiian Navy flag, from a design by Mrs. Strong, contains in the center, on a white back ground, a gold crown resting on a yellow shield. The shield contains a white tabu stick [puloulou], crossed by two red kahilis, Continue reading