On the 100th anniversary of the passing of Queen Liliuokalani, 1917-2017.

[Found under: “LILIUOKALANI. A Published Interview With Her.”]

The Hawaiians are my people, and I am still their Queen. To the Hawaiians I shall always be Queen while I am alive, and after I am dead I shall still be their Queen—their dead Queen. But Hawaii is not in the hands of its people. From other countries all kinds of people have come—some wise, some foolish, some good, some very mean. They found fortunes in my county under the protection of my fathers, and then they robbed me of my throne.

[This quote is taken from an interview by Jule de Rytiler originally published in the American Woman’s Home Journal. For the entire interview as published by the Independent, see here.]

(Independent, 4/1/1897, p. 4)

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The Independent, Volume IV, Number 547, Page 4. April 1, 1897.

 

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Kaiulani Elementary School celebrates the birthday of the Princess, 1899.

KAIULANI SCHOOL

Pupils Have a Holiday Next Monday.

Exercises This Evening In Honor of the Princess’s Birthday—Program for the Occasion.

Monday being the anniversary of the late Princess Kaiulani’s birthday, the pupils of the Princess Kaiulani school will be given a whole holiday.

Exercises will be held this evening in the large hall, but owing to the lack of seating accommodation no invitations have been sent out to parents or friends this year. The program is the work of the pupils entirely. They devoted a good portion of yesterday to obtaining ilima leis and maile to decorate the picture of the late Princess. Continue reading

English coverage of the Heen/Notley wedding, with better pictures, 1906.

POPULAR COUPLE WEDDED

MR. AND MRS. WM. H. HEEN.

An impressive ceremony at St. Andrew’s cathedral last evening united Miss Lily Notley and Mr. William H. Heen in marriage. The ceremony was performed in the presence of a large number of friends. The bride was attended by Mrs. Leslie, as matron of honor, and the groom was served by his brother, Mr. Afong Heen, as best man. Rev. F. Fitz officiated.

The church was simply decorated, a border of waxy white flowers mingled with fern leaves adorning the chancel rail. The bride was given away by her father, Mr. Charles Notley. Continue reading

Katsu Goto murder trial, 1890.

AN INFORMER’S EVIDENCE.

The Testimony Given by John Richmond in the Honokaa Murder Case.

John Richmond sworn, stated—My name is J. Richmond and I live in Honokaa. I was stable man for Mr. Overend. I was there in October last; I know defendants; Mr. Steele is luna for Mr. Overend; my house i on the west side of the stable; from Overend’s house it is three or four hundred feet; October 28th last I was there; Mr. Steele came after me sometime after I was in bed and asked me to go to the Jap quarters, and told me to watch for Jap and find out where he went to, and I was to carry the information to the schoolhouse; (map shown and Overend’s house, stables and schoolhouse located. Schoolhouse where he was told to go); I do not know what time it was, I had been asleep and no one was with me; I stood by wood pile watching for Jap about half an hour; I did not know Goto; I did not know who I was watching for; I went up and saw Jap come out and get on horse and then I went up Government road to the schoolhouse; I met Mr. Steele there; I was on foot; I walked as fast as I could going up a hill; took me about ten minutes to go up and I met Steele there; I told him that the Jap had started and went towards big quarters; I then said, I will go back and he said “no, wait awhile, I may need you;” I saw him mount his horse; I stayed by cemetery fence and he told me to stop there till he called for me; I sat down then on the edge of the road; there is grass there and a fence; I could not say how long I stayed there, and I saw Jap coming on horseback. He was walking his horse up the hill; I was on the west side of the road and Jap was near that side; when Jap got there I saw Lala, Blabon and Steele rush out for the horse. Blabon and Steele pulled the man from the horse, and Lala grabbed the horse by the bridle; there was grass there; Steele grabbed the Jap by the head, back of the head and mouth, and Blabon took hold of the man’s body; Jap came off the horse kind of on his knees; he was then taken in to the opposite lot and laid on his face; I could not tell how long he was lying there; Jap in the end was hung; this was all done within an hour. Steele, Blabon Watson and Mills carried him up from the road; after they got there they tied his hands behind his back; Blabon tied his feet; I heard Jap say, Pau, pau; after he was down on his feet I did not hear anything more; heard no groan; and then after he was tied he was carried up to the Government road running through Honokaa; he was carried to the makai side of the road near trail and left; this last place is about 200 feet from telephone post; he was laid down and Mills asked me to go over to telephone post and get a rope; it was a new rope about ¾ inch thick; I found the rope at the telephone post; it lay coiled up in coil, and had a noose made on the end; it was regular hangman’s knot; other end was unrolled and one strand was cut off a short distance up; the rope was a new one. (The rope is brought in and recognized as the rope found at the telephone pole.) I gave the rope to Watson; I was gone a few minutes; I took the rope where man was lying; I gave it to Watson; Then somebody said “My God! He is dead.” I stooped down and put my hand on the man’s heart, but could not feel and pulse; I helped to carry him over; Blabon, Steele and Mills also helped; Watson came with the rope; there was no struggle on the part of the Jap after we got to the telephone pole; the rope was crossed over arm at post; Watson cast the rope; Mill’s raised the body up and cast the rope over Jap’s neck and then we pulled him up; I last saw Lala when he was taking horses up to Lyceum; he was tied to hitching rack inside the Lyceum yard; I did not see Lala any more that night.

By a Juryman—The Jap was carried to the same pole where I found rope.

By the Court—Mr. Mills pointed to the pole and said to go and get that rope.

Examination continued—Steele was on horseback; Steele’s horse was tied by Lala right near the road; tied near gate post; other end of the rope was made fast to the telephone pole; I do not know exactly who made it fast; Mill’s made the remark that they would ask the man some questions, and after they thought he was dead, Mills said: “Well, he will not sell any more goods;” the body was entirely unresisting when we carried him; Steele caught him at the  back of the head and over the mouth; Steele was afoot at the time; Goto the Jap was medium sized; kind of slim built; not a heavy man; the horse I could not say as to his weight, but he was about 14 or 15 hands high; Steele was on the same side of the horse that I was; they stopped the horse and the Jap called “Pau, pau,” and Steele caught him by the mouth; the Jap was leaning over the side a little; after the Jap was hanged we stopped around a few minutes; I was told not to tell any one who had done it; Mills cautioned me: after that I went home; the Jap was dressed in light clothes, shirt and pair of blue overalls; I think dungaree pants; I could not describe the hat; I had hold of the fee when I carried him. [Pants shown and identified as same kind that he wore; as to the shirt it was something like shirt shown.] He did not have stockings on; I did not recollect any shoes at all; hat placed I do not know where; Mills had a cap on; peaks and ear flaps to it, and had on kind of cloak. (Cap shown and identified as cap and cloak shown and identified as cloak). I know Mr. Mills, have known him about eighteen months; I have know Steele and Watson ever since I have been at Overend’s plantation; Blabon I had seen once before; I am in no doubt who the persons were that night; I do not know Lala and I have nothing to do with him, and I did not know who he was till that night; I suppose that Lala was told to told the horse; some one spoke to him; Mills called him and told him something in kanaka and he went and took the horses and tied them; Mills said that we will not say anything about it; I spoke up and said we will know nothing about it at all; others assented; after this I went home and that is all I know; I came home and went to bed; from stable to my room about twenty-five feet; I have a window in my room that I can look right out of to the front of the stable; I was woke up by hearing some talking; I saw Steele and Watson leaving the stable; I could not tell what they were saying; I had gone to bed a few minutes after 8 when Steele came and called me first; my work is to get cane tops and feed horses; I had to take care of seven horses; Mr. Steele’s horse was in the stable; the horse that Steele uses all of the time is a white horse; Lala took Steele’s horse; Overend had one white saddle horse and two black horses; horses are cleaned every night when they get through work, about 7:30; Steele’s and Overend’s horses were groomed and cleaned that night; the next morning they had saddle marks on them; that showed that they had been used during the night.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 5/22/1890, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XI, Number 121, Page 3. May 22, 1890.

Calendar featuring pictures of the commission who took the anti-annexation petition to D.C., 1898.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS”]

The Ka Ahailono o Hawaii has issued an Alamanach for 1898 which is adorned with the pictures of the Hawaiian anti-annexation commission now in Washington.

[This is just another thing I wish I could see. As of today, there are no extant copies found of Ahailono o Hawaii (which first appeared on 6/7/1897). Maybe one of these days, someone will come across some. Please be on the look out.]

(Independent, 1/15/1898, p. 3)

Independent_1_15_1898_3

The Independent, Volume VI, Number 790, Page 3. January 15, 1898.

Kamehameha III at Mokuula, 1846.

Court News. His Majesty and suite landed at Lahaina on the morning of the  17th. They were received by the new Governor and the other authorities, under the customary salute from the Fort. His Majesty proceeded to the residence of the Premier, where he rested for a short time. He then visited the large Palace now in progress, and afterwards retired to his former residence at Mokuula. Continue reading

How bad leaders and their advisers were dealt with in Kaʻū, 1890.

INCIDENTS IN HAWAIIAN HISTORY.

Before Kamehameha the First had reduced the island of Hawaii to his subjection the various districts were ruled over by petty kings or high chiefs. Anecdotes of three of these aliis who successively ruled over the large district of Kau, are still current among the natives. They are not mythical, but actual events.

Koihala the alii of Kau was about making a voyage from Kona to Kau in his fleet of canoes. He sent word to his people of Kau to meet him with supplies of food on a certain day at Kapua.

The people cooked hogs, dogs and potatoes and prepared poi, water in calabashes and other supplies in sufficient quantities for the chief and his retainers, and started afoot with their burdens to meet him. On arriving at Kapua the fleet came along but did not stop. The alii called to the people ashore to go back to the next landing towards South Point. They resumed their burdens and retraced their steps to this place, the king proceeding by sea. At this place they were told to go on still further to another landing. This was repeated several times and they were finally told to climb the steep pali and meet the king at Kaalualu around and east of South Point. The people were tired, foot sore and hungry from their wearisome travel over the lava and determined upon a different reception to their alii from what he expected. They said “we will teach these chiefs a lesson not to wear us out with their capricious whims. We are hungry and we will eat the food and give him another article of diet instead.” So they sat down and ate up the food and filled the ti-leaf containers with stones and proceeded to near the coast and sat on a slight hill to await the coming of the chief and his party. He landed and proceeded up the ascent to receive his hookupu (tribute of food). When near, the people stood up and, taking the stones from the containers, threw them at the king and his retainers saying, “Here is your pig,” “Here is your dog,” “Here are your potatoes,” etc., and Koihala was killed. The stone, a short way on the road from Kaalualu to Waiohinu is still pointed out as the exact spot where Koihala—the exacting tyrant—met his death. Continue reading