Kamehameha III’s new royal standard, 1845.

Foreign Office, May 14th, 1845.

Sir,—I am commanded by the King, to make known to you His Majesty’s thanks for the kind courtesy with which you have allowed one of your men to prepare his Royal Standard, according to the national devices arranged at the Herald’s Office, in London. Continue reading

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Hawaiian Flag Badges, 1893.

HAWAII FOREVER!!

HAWAIIAN

FLAG BADGES

—IN—

Gold and Colored Enamel!

Come early and secure one before they are all gone.

THOS. LINDSAY,

Jeweler.

McINERNY BLOCK, – – FORT STREET.

(Daily Bulletin, 8/28/1893, p. 3)

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The Daily Bulletin, Volume VI, Number 815, Page 3. August 28, 1893.

The Hawaiian flag in British waters, 1853.

A Maritime Novelty.—The arrival of the Hawaiian brig Magdalia, Capt. Taber, exhibited quite a Fourth of July novelty in our harbor. It was the first time that the royal flag of the far-off kingdom in the Pacific had ever been displayed in these waters, and a very good-looking flag it is, blending the main features of the American, British, and French national colors. The union is a mixture of St. George’s cross with some other devices which we do not understand, and look at a casual view almost identical with that of the British flag, while the body of the Kanaka ensign shows eight stripes, alternately of white, blue, and red; and, as it flung its folds to the breeze it seemed an appropriate emblem of independence, and a fitting accompaniment of our own rejoicings on the glorious day we were celebrating. Continue reading

Kahuna lapaau and the law, 1886.

AN ACT

To Regulate the Hawaiian Board of Health.

Be it enacted by the King and the Legislative Assembly of the Hawaiian Islands in the Legislature of the Kingdom Assembled:

Section 1. His Majesty the King shall appoint five native Hawaiians to be a Hawaiian Board of Health, and His Majesty the King shall appoint one of them to be President of said Board, and all of said Board shall be persons skilled in the practice of native medicine, of good character, and they shall serve during the King’s pleasure.

Section 2. It shall be the duty of said Hawaiian Board of Health to hear all applications made by native Hawaiians who wish to practice native medicine in this Kingdom for the cure of any kind of disease, or for the cure of chronic diseases or hereditary diseases, or for the cure of broken bones.

Section 3. Said Board, or a majority thereof, shall give to each applicant a certificate certifying to the Minister of the Interior the qualification of the applicant to practice native medicine in any kind of disease, or for the treatment of chronic disease or hereditary diseases, of the cure of broken bones, as may be stated in the application.

Section 4. The Minister of the Interior shall grant on the order of the said Board a license to any applicant who has received a certificate of his qualification to practice medicine in any kind of disease, upon receiving twenty dollars.

Section 5. Every person so licensed to practice medicine, as in Section 4 of this Act specified, shall keep records of his practice of medicine, and shall enter correctly in such records all the business done by him. Any person who shall practice hoomanamana, hoopiopio, anaana, or hoounauna, shall have his license cancelled immediately. Continue reading

Alexander Young Cafe, 1910.

There is more than soupcon of elegance in the meals served at the Alexander Young Cafe. It is real, from top to bottom of the menu card, and nothing is left to the imagination.

[I was just told by someone who knew the establishment that the cheese bread that came out of the bakery was the best. But she heard that the baker took the recipe with him when he passed on… And you don’t hear the word “soupçon” very often these days!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 5/1/1910, p. 18)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume VII, Number 382, Page 18. May 1, 1910.

Lydia Bingham returns to head the Honolulu Female Seminary, 1867

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

Honolulu Female Seminary.—In our advertising columns will be seen the advertisement of the Honolulu Female Academy, which is another of the schools provided by Christian benevolence for the benefit of the children of this highly favored land. This institution will, it is hoped, supply a felt need for a home for girls, in the town of Honolulu, yet not too near its center of business. It is being commenced in the substantial buildings erected many years since by the American Mission as a printing house and bindery, in connection with the premises of the Rev. E. W. Clark, Continue reading

The grand celebration of the 64th birthday of Princess Ruta Keelikolani Keanolani Kanahoahoa Muolaulani Keikiheleloa Keanohalia Kaleonahenahe Kohalikolani at her newly completed Keoua Hale, 1882.

Birthday of Her Royal Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.

Her Royal Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani celebrated, on Thursday last, her sixty-fourth birthday by a luau, or banquet in native Hawaiian fashion, given at H. R. H.’s new mansion in Emma-street, followed on the evening of Friday by a Reception and Ball. The occasion was indeed adopted for the “house-warming” the handsome and beautifully decorated house being only just ready for occupation. The event has been long talked of, and looked forward to, and has been the chief topic of conversation during the past week, almost to the exclusion of all others, causing the exciting events of the previous week to fall quite into the background.

The Mansion which was the scene of these festivities is situated on the land known as Kaakopua, which has a long frontage to the Ewa side of Emma-Street. It is a handsome structure of two main stories, on a high basement with an attic story and turret above. On the main floor on the mauka side of the house, are two drawing rooms which communicate with one another by a wide arch. Continue reading