Neutrality proclaimed by King Kamehameha III, 1854.

Proclamation.

Kamehameha III King of the Hawaiian Islands.

Be it known to all whom it may concern, that We, Kamehameha III, King of the Hawaiian Islands, hereby proclaim our entire Neutrality in the war now impending between the Great Maritime powers of Europe; that Our Neutrality is to be respected by all Belligerents, to the full extent of Our Jurisdiction, which by Our Fundamental laws is to the distance of one of one marine league, surrounding each of our islands of Hawaii, Maui, Kahoolawe, Lanai, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai and Niihau, commencing at low water mark on each of the respective coasts of said Islands, and includes all channels passing between and dividing said islands, from Island to island; that all captures and sizures made within Our said Jurisdiction are unlawful; and that the protection andd hospitality of Our Ports, Harbors and Roads, shall be equally extended to all the belligerents, so long as they respect Our neutrality. Continue reading

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Kamehameha III at Mokuula, 1846.

Court News. His Majesty and suite landed at Lahaina on the morning of the  17th. They were received by the new Governor and the other authorities, under the customary salute from the Fort. His Majesty proceeded to the residence of the Premier, where he rested for a short time. He then visited the large Palace now in progress, and afterwards retired to his former residence at Mokuula. Continue reading

Death of Kamehameha III and the accession of Kamehameha IV, 1854.

OLELO HOOLAHA.

NO KA MEA ua lawe ke Akua ola mau loa, mai keia ao aku, i ka MOI KAMEHAMEHA III, ko kakou alii aloha mamua iho nei; no ka mea hoi, mamuli o ke kauoha a ka MOI mamua iho nei a mamuli hoi o ka olelo hooholo a me ka Olelo Hoolaha a ka MOI a me ka Halealii ua kukala ia ka Mea Kiekie Liholiho, oia kona hope;

Nolaila, ke hoolaha nei ma keia olelo, o ke Alii Alexander Liholiho, oia ka MOI o ko Hawaii pae aina, a o kona inoa alii, o KAMEHAMEHA IV. Na ke Akua e malama ke Alii.

KEONI ANA,

Kuhina Nui.

(Polynesian, 12/16/1854, p. 2)

OLELO HOOLAHA.

The Polynesian, Volume XI, Number 32, Page 2. December 16, 1854.

Continue reading

Alexander Liholiho is proclaimed Kamehameha IV, 1854.

PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, it has pleased Almighty God to remove from this world our beloved Sovereign, His Late Majesty, Kamehameha III; and whereas, by the Will of His late Majesty, and by the appointment and Proclamation of His Majesty and of the House of Nobles, His Royal Highness, Prince Liholiho, was declared to be His Majesty’s Successor. Therefore, Public Proclamation is hereby made, that Prince Alexander Liholiho is KING of the Hawaiian Islands, under the style of KAMEHAMEHA IV. God Preserve the King.

KEONI ANA,

Kuhina Nui.

(Polynesian, 12/16/1854, p. 2)

PROCLAMATION.

The Polynesian, Volume XI, Number 32, Page 2. December 16, 1854.

Alexander Liholiho becomes Kamehameha IV, 1854.

OLELO HOOLAHA.

NO KA MEA ua lawe aku ke Akua ola mau loa, mai keia ao aku, i ka MOI KAMEHAMEHA III, ko kakou alii aloha mamua iho nei; no ka mea hoi, mamuli o ke kauoha a ka MOI mamua iho nei a mamuli hoi o ka olelo hooholo a me ka Olelo Hoolaha a ka MOI a me ka Halealii ua kukala ia ka Mea Kiekie Liholiho, oia kona hope;

Nolaila, ke hoolahaia nei ma keia olelo, o ke Alii Alexander Liholiho, oia ka MOI o ko Hawaii pae aina, a o kona inoa alii, o KAMEHAMEHA IV. Na ke Akua e malama ke Alii.

KEONI ANA,

Kuhina Nui.

(Polynesian, 12/16/1854, p. 2)

OLELO HOOLAHA.

The Polynesian, Volume XI, Number 32, Page 2. December 16, 1854.

Personal Lands of Kamehameha III, and Government Lands, 1848.

By the Government.

A LAW FOR THE PERSONAL LANDS OF THE KING,
AND THE LANDS OF THE NATION.

[Here is a newly passed law of the land appearing in the newspaper Elele Hawaii. One of the functions of the newspapers was to inform the nation’s citizens of new laws and proclamations from the government. This particular law establishes the Crown Lands (and Government Lands) which still holds much importance to this day.

For a translation see “A Supplement to the Statute Laws of His Majesty, Kamehameha III., King of the Hawaiian Islands, … 1848.” pp. 22–43.

What is also valuable about this listing is that it describes in 1848 what ahupuaa a certain land belonged to, and so forth.]

(Elele Hawaii, 7/14/1848, pp. 17–20.)

HE KANAWAI NO NA AINA PONOI O KA MOI, A ME NA AINA O KE AUPUNI.

Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 4, Pepa 5, Aoao 17. Iulai 14, 1848.

 

HE KANAWAI NO NA AINA PONOI O KA MOI, A ME NA AINA O KE AUPUNI.

Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 4, Pepa 5, Aoao 18. Iulai 14, 1848.

HE KANAWAI NO NA AINA PONOI O KA MOI, A ME NA AINA O KE AUPUNI.

Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 4, Pepa 5, Aoao 19. Iulai 14, 1848.

HE KANAWAI NO NA AINA PONOI O KA MOI, A ME NA AINA O KE AUPUNI.

Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 4, Pepa 5, Aoao 20. Iulai 14, 1848.