Praying with patience, 1893.

ON BENDED KNEE.

During these days of turmoil of thought and perplexity of life, we have but one sanctuary that we remind our fellow citizens of, where they can receive solace and put an end to the burdens of sadness and grief, Continue reading

Koloa, and more on Kaauhelemoa, 1871.

Duck-Shooting on Oahu.—For a country where the occupation of the sportsman is so little followed as here, those who do occasionally spend a day in its pursuit are amply rewarded by the sight of the many beauties of nature of our island. The wild duck is peculiar in its habits, and loves to haunt the lonely solitudes of the mountain fastnesses during the daytime, coming down at night to visit the streams, the taro-patches and the sea-shore for food. One of these noted haunts of the wild duck, which is very seldom visited and never has been described in print, lies far up in the bosom of the mountains, at the head of Palolo valley. Continue reading

E o, e Ka Wahine Hele La o Kaiona!

[Found under: “Local News”]

This past Tuesday [12/19/1911], the students of the Kamehameha Schools celebrated the birthday of Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop; there were a number of cars which brought them to the cemetery at Maemae; and Queen Liliuokalani was amongst the people who arrived to see the ceremonies held at the cemetery.

[And they of course are honoring her again this day!]

(Kuokoa, 12/22/1911, p. 8)

Ma ka Poalua nei i hoomanao ae...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 51, Aoao 8. Dekemaba 22, 1911.

Continuation of Theodore Kelsey’s lament, 1948.

A Hawaiian Lament
By THEODORE KELSEY
II

A little seaward of this forbidden domain the face of the father valley-ridge is sadly disfigured by a large quarrying scar, obliterating the interesting light-colored formation of Ka Upena a Maui—Demi-god Maui’s Fishnet.

Continuing down the road a short distance we come to the place where, on the upper side, the large sacred rock of Kane-hoa-lani has been split up. Continue reading

Theodore Kelsey reminisces about his life on Kauai and in Palolo, 1948.

A Hawaiian Lament
By THEODORE KELSEY
I

One of the most cherished memories of the writer’s life is that of himself as a small barefoot boy, when, with his mother, his little girl playmate and sweetheart, and others less remembered, he made a midnight visit from his home in Ke-kaha, on the enchanted island of Kau’ai, traveling in a horse-drawn, vehicle to the far-famed “Barking Sands,” at Mana’ (mah-nah’), lovingly called by the Hawaiians “Ke One Kani o No-hili—”The Sounding Sand of No-hili.” Continue reading