Charles Burnette Wilson dies, conclusion, 1926.

CHARLES BURNETTE WILSON, ADVISOR TO LILIUOKALANI DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS

(Continued from page 1)

Liliuokalani that she lost her throne due to the landing of troops from the U. S. S. Boston, the name of Marshal Wilson figured frequently. In the printed reports of Congress, containing the correspondence of Minister Stevens prior to the overthrow, his dispatches include the name of Wilson frequently in connection with the monarchy and especially refer to him as a very intimate friend of the queen. Continue reading

About Kaauhelemoa, 1895.

Kaauhelemoa.

This place remaining until this day to the north-east of Palolo valley and is surrounded by the mist of the cliffs most of the year is famous. In the old stories of Hawaii it is said that there was a supernatural champion fighting chicken of that place, and he was said to be a man-chicken and and chicken-man. He remained the victor before all of his opponents who stood before him; but there came a time that there appeared a champion chicken from Molokai (?), he was but a slim supernatural chicken, and it was he who thwarted the strength of Kaauhelemoa by actually entering the body of Kaauhelemoa, and started nibbling with his beak, and when he got out, Kaauhelemoa was in trouble, and flew to this place mentioned above, and scattered his feathers here and there, and growing there until today is a plant that very much resembles a chicken feather that is not found in other places in Hawaii nei. There is a large pool there and all varieties of kalo grow there until today. Continue reading

Leprosy patients protest against R. W. Wilcox, 1902.

LEPERS DENOUNCE WILCOX

Appeal to Voters to Elect Kuhio.

DECLARE DELEGATE NOT HAWAIIAN

Say His Act is Not That of a Friend of the People

Once more have the lepers at Kalaupapa spoken, and their voice is even stronger against Wilcox and his plans for their future than on the occasion of their resolutions which were laid before the Senatorial Commission.

The latest meeting of the lepers was held on Wednesday  last at Beretania Hall, at the settlement, and the gathering was a very large one. The speakers denounced the attempts of Wilcox to transfer them bodily to the Federal government for control, and as well they refused to listen to any explanations as to his meaning when he urges such transfer. The majority of the speakers predicted a landslide for Prince Kuhio and the Republican ticket. It was said that the lepers would now begin to lay before their friends all over the islands their fears for the future in the even of the reelection of Wilcox,and would also appeal to their people to prevent such a happening.

The resolutions which were adopted and which have been sent to prominent men on other islands as well as to Honolulu, are as follows:

An appeal to the Hawaiian people from the Leper Settlement at Kalaupapa,Molokai.

To the Hawaiian people in general; listen and consider the appeal of your unfortunates.

We, your unfortunate relatives and friends living in the Settlement where sorrow and woes abound,separated from you on account of the sickness that befell us, wish to appeal to you. You all know that the man we once trusted and in whom we put our faith, and whom we elected as our Delegate to Washington, has returned evil for good to us poor unfortunates, and to the people in general by introducing a bill in Congress which calls for the transferring of the care and maintenance of the Leper Settlement to the Federal government.

Such action by the Delegate without referring the matter to us, the unfortunate lepers, is one of the most dirty, cruel and low doings of a man toward his fellow men.

You must not think that by such giving over of our care to a stranger we would be benefited. Far from it. A stranger would not be painstaking, and moreover, have no love for the unfortunate Hawaiians, and if such a bill be passed our troubles and sorrows will be greater than we can bear.

We are willing to bear our own woes, sorrows and our heavily laden burdens cheerfully, if by so doing you will be saved, but has the intention of pitting sorrows upon sorrow any traces of love of the Delegate for us? Or is it true, then, that you also have followed the acts of the Delegate and have joined with him in heaping sorrow threefold upon us?

R. W. Wilcox stated before the Senatorial Commission “that the majority of the Hawaiian people have shown their willingness to give over our care to the Federal government.”

Is there any truth in this statement? Is it also ture that there are Hawaiians besides Wilcox who wish to put us in an oven of fire and to increase our sorrows a hundredfold? We will answer and say “no.”

Has the bond of love between husband and wife, father and children, family to family, fellowman to man, been put asunder? We think it has not, and right here we denounce Wilcox and say that he is not a true Hawaiian.

We have an old saying which goes: “See to your fellowman first, then to your dog.” It is not the same with Wilcox. He has given his aloha to a dog rather than to us.

We have sent a petition signed by 750…

(PCA, 10/20/1902,  p. 1)

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Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXXV, Number 6303, Page 1. October 20, 1902.

…names protesting against the bill, and we pray and appeal to you all to erase Wilcox’s name from your ballot as Delegate to Congress.

We the unfortunate lepers, residing in the Settlement, through our committee,

John S. Wilmington, John T. Unea, J. K. Waiamau, Charles M. Brewster, L. M. Painamu, J. C. Kiliia, J. K. Kainuwai, Moses Koahoa, H. K. Akanui, J. Kiaaina, J. D. Kahale, John Haulani, A. W. Bruns, Joel H. Mahoe, Achong Holuk, George Nakaokoo, W. K. Kalua, D. Kaialamni, Komi Naupo, J. Kiaipa, James Alenuihaha, Jaianui, Chalres K. Manua, A. M. Holopinai, Thomas K. Nathaniel, Silas Carter, James Prosser, P. Kiha, J. P. Miau, J. K. Kialoa, George J. Kanikau.

Kalaupapa, Molokai, October 16th, 1902.

(PCA, 10/20/1902, p. 4)

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Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XXXV, Number 6303, Page 4. October 20, 1902.

Joseph Kaiponohea Aea, 1901.

—It is expected that our first and nearest insular possession in the Pacific—the Sandwich Islands—will soon have a representative in the Military Academy at West Point,  in the person of Mr. Joseph Kaiponohea Aea. Mr. Aea is a young man of eighteen years, a pure-blood Hawaiian native. Continue reading

Arrests being made for disturbing the peace? 1892.

“HOOKAHI NO HAWAE LAUHUE KONA.”*

This past Friday, the Government began arresting people thought to be taking part in activities that go against the good and the peace of the Nation, and these are the names that we obtained. The Hon. Wilcox, the Hon. J. W. Bipikane, Mr. V. V. Ashford, and many others.

*An olelo noeau speaking to the wide-reaching power of a single entity.

(Hawaii Holomua, 5/21/1892, p. 3)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke II, Helu 21, Aoao 3. Mei 21, 1892.