A few days after December 7, 1941.

For the Good of Hawaiians

THE MILITARY MADE STATEMENT ABOUT FOOD AND SOME OTHER THINGS.

The military stated that it is necessary to ration food supply and some other items, and so too with medicines, gasoline, oil, and some other things, like food for animals. Continue reading

Oliver H. Kapau, Clarence J. Olds, and James Akana Ai off to Georgia, 1927.

THREE OF NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS HERE TO INFANTRY SCHOOL

Three members of the Hawaii national guard (298th Infantry), will go to Fort Benning, Ga., to attend the infantry school which will be held at that post from February 28 to May 28, according to orders received from the secretary of war by Col. Percy M. Smoot, commandant. They are Capt. Oliver H. Kapau, Capt. Clarence J. Olds and Master Sgt. James Akana Ai. Continue reading

John Adams Kalahanauokalani Kalakaua Miles, 1917.

John A. K. K. Miles

In The Service of America

The picture above is of a Hawaiian boy who is working in the navy of America at St. Pedro Los Angeles as a secretary in the department of the payroll of the military. Continue reading

I have come across this obituary a number of times, and each time, I think, “What a name!” 1921.

KING KEONAONA IAPANA OKURA HAS PASSED ON

To the Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Please insert  in your pride of the nation, our bundle of tears of sadness, about our beloved who departed this life, so that the family and many friends living from Hawaii, the Island of Keawe all the way to Kauai of Manokalanipo will know. Continue reading

Edward H. Hanapi, Jr. in Asia writes home, 1920.

Hawaiian Youths in  Siberia

To My Dear Papa

From when we left Honolulu until we reached Japan, I have been reminiscing about you and younger brother, Emperor. The first port we entered was Nagasaki in Japan, which is the port which American ships regularly enter; and from this port we went to Vladivostok. While in Nagasaki, I sent a postcard, and perhaps you have received it. In the month of February, I sent $100; I have not received a response from you, papa. I am sending another $75 by bank draft; tell me if you receive this money. Siberia is a cold land, and we have everything we need. When we arrived in this land, we were well taken care of by the group “Knights of Columbus.” Continue reading

Joseph Kaiponohea Aea, 1901.

—It is expected that our first and nearest insular possession in the Pacific—the Sandwich Islands—will soon have a representative in the Military Academy at West Point,  in the person of Mr. Joseph Kaiponohea Aea. Mr. Aea is a young man of eighteen years, a pure-blood Hawaiian native. Continue reading