The fourth anniversary of La Hoihoi Ea, 1847.

RESTORATION DAY.

The celebration of the fourth anniversary of the Restoration of the Hawaiian Flag by Rear Admiral Richard Thomas took place on Saturday last—July 31. The morning unfortunately was lowery, much rain fell in the valley, and some showers reached town. Notwithstanding this and the muddy roads, by early dawn, parties on foot and horseback were thronging the road to the King’s residence at Nuuanu, where the appointed feast was to come of.

At  the 8 o’clock signal gun from the fort the national ensigns and royal colors were raised throughout the town. Continue reading

Advertisements

Vermont hears of Restoration Day, 1843.

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

Letters from the Islands to August 5, furnish some additional particulars relating to the restoration of the native government.—The doings of Lord Paulet’s Provisional Government were outrageous, and compelled the retirement of Dr. Judd from all participation in it. The following letter is from the Boston Daily Advertiser:

U. S. Ship Constellation,
Off Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 1843.

It is probably known in the United States that in February last, his Lordship Captain George Paulet, of Her Majesty’s ship Carysfort, visit these Islands; and after urging upon King Kamehameha III., in succession, various demands, with many of which it was found impossible to comply, an making preparations to fire upon the city of Honolulu, compelled a cession of the Sovereignty to the Queen of Great Britain, and appointed a Commission of four, of which his Majesty or his deputy were permitted to be a member, for the provisional government of the Island, until her Majesty’s pleasure should be made known; which time the “existing laws, and those made at the ensuing council of the King and chiefs” were to continue in full force so far as natives were concerned,” and to for the basis of the administration of justice by the Commission between foreigns residents on these Islands, and all existing engagements of the King were to be executed and performed as if the cession had never been made.” Continue reading

Day honoring Kamehameha Paiea, 1892.

KAMEHAMEHA DAY

This 11th day of June is one of the important days for Hawaiians, cherished and greatly displayed amongst the holidays of the land. This day was established by Kamehameha V as a day of remembrance for his royal kupuna Kamehameha I, the conqueror of the nation who unified all of the islands to be governed under one alii. Continue reading

Chinese New Year celebrated in Hilo, 1883.

Island Notes.

HAWAII—HILO.

Genial showers are falling, the cane is growing, the mills grinding, and everything promises prosperity.

Yesterday the Chinese New Year, or Konohi, passed off in grand celestial style. Bales of firecrackers, Chinese bombs and Roman candles were exploded, and any amount of chickens, rice and sweetmeats were consumed. The layout was grand in every Chinese establishment. The blooming jonquils, fragrant lilies and other flowers formed the background to their loaded tables. All were welcome and hospitality was dealt out indiscriminately with a free hand. Continue reading

Chinese New Years, 1868.

Happy New Year Day of the Chinese.

Today, the 25th of January, will be celebrated by all the Chinese, as the first day of their new year.

Sometimes the first day of their new year begins in January, and sometimes in February, because the way they reckon their years is by the orbiting of the moon, and therefore, some years they have twelve months, and some years they have thirteen; and the years they have thirteen months, is a bit like our reckoning.

We  are told that in the towns of their Land, on the day before the new moon of their new year, there is a great procession on the streets and at the Eastern Gates, where the Sun rises, for their towns are secured by tall stone walls. Where the people gather outside of the wall, they build an altar and upon it they place offerings, candles, and wine [?? waina]—the Leader of the Procession kneels three times, and knocks his head nine times, along with other religious practices of theirs; that is their celebration of new year.

What they do every new year is broken down into five parts below:

Offerings to the Sun and the Earth—the worshiping of family gods—the worshiping of those who died and the ancestors—bowing before their living parents and other elders, and celebrating because of the new year.

Adults, when they visit their friends, they are given tea to drink and watermelon seeds to eat. The Chinese do not eat meat on the first day of the year, and eat food that grows from the land that beautifies the heavens and earth. And the poor, when they enter houses and give their greetings, they ask for sweets or other food. They close their Shops for some days in their own Lands. When the Chinese go to foreign Lands, the poor continue to perform the work of their parents, and they certainly never go without honoring the new year.

Amongst us here in Hawaii nei, there are many of those people, and it is their holiday. This is a lahui that does not worship Jehovah, the one true God, but they have many gods; they burn a lot of paper to them, which is the scent which carries their prayers.

Those Chinese are numerous who live amongst us, they are in many classes.

We hope that these Chinese soon understand the truth, by learning and believing in the Christian People, and they will stand equally as fine kamaaina amongst us, and not help those who follow the ways of their land.

Happy new year to you, and have a good new year.

[This year, the year of the dog begins on 2/16 (Friday). Let’s hope that that is the beginning of a good year!]

(Kuokoa, 1/25/1868, p. 3)

Kuokoa_1_25_1868_3.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 4, Aoao 3. Ianuari 25, 1868.