The death of Kaoleioku Pauli, 1874.

O PAULI, ALOHA

This past Tuesday, the 30th of December, at 7 o’clock in the evening, Kaoleioku Pauli left this earthly body and silently went on to the hidden pathway of Kanaloa; to return to the slumber of Niolopua, the eternal rest.

He was a man who was often seen in the royal courts of Hawaii nei, and he was a chief born of the land as shown in the genealogy chart below:

Keawe (m) dwelt with Lonomaaikanaka (f), begot was Kalaninuiiamamao (m); Kalaninuiiamamao (m) dwelt with Kamakaimoku, begot was Kalaniopuu (m); Kalaniopuu (m) dwelt with Ahia (f), begot was Kekuehoa (f); Kekuehoa dwelt with Kamahinakauloa (m), begot was Kaiakuilani (f); Kaiakauilani dwelt with Puumahiole (m), begot was Haumea (m); Haumea dwelt with Paaluhi (f), begot was Pauli; and he married Wakeki, but they have no offsrping. But it is sad that it was revealed that his wife is now pregnant with child, and perhaps the blood of Pauli will be begotten anew, and the name Kaoleioku Pauli will be given.

Pauli was born at Keauhou, in North Kona, Hawaii, on the 22nd of November 1836, and therefore he reached 37 years old and 1 month and 7 days.

He began playing the band during the time it was lead by William Merseburgh [?? Uilama Olelo-e], and he was the only student left from the band of the Kings, from Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III to Lunalilo, and while in that occupation, he fell. He was a man that was skilled at singing, and he was the greatest of Hawaiians in his deep knowledge of singing; and he greatly assisted in leading the choir of Kawaiahao; and he was always seen in front of song concerts with the alii Pauahi and Kamakaeha.

He was assigned by the Board of Education as a singing teacher for the government school for the district of Kona, Honolulu, and while in that position he let go of his burdens.

Pau ka lohe ana i kana ohe,
Ke kani kapalili mai i Iolani,
Pau ka lohe’a ana o kona leo,
Ma na paia eehia o Kawaiahao,
E na keiki kula, ua hele ke kumu,
Ua hele ka makua nana e ao mai,
Ma na anuu leo o na leo mele,
E Pauli e, aloha, aloha pau ole!
Imia ou mau kupuna alii,
Aia ia i ka lewanuu i ka lewa lani,
Aia ma ke ala polikua a Kane,
Imiia a loaa ou mau kini,
I hookahi ka noho’na i ka hale anuanu.

[No more will we hear wind instrument,
Its trilling song from Iolani,
No more will his voice be heard,
In the solemn walls of Kawaiahao,
O Schoolchildren, your teacher has gone,
Went is the father who taught,
The intervals in singing,
O Pauli, aloha, our never-ending aloha!
Seek out your chiefly ancestors,
They are in the sky up above, the sky in the heaven,
On the dark path of Kane,
Search out and find your relatives,
You will live as one in the cold house.

This is not the Pauli Kaoleioku who was the son of Kamehameha I and Kanekapolei.]

(Nuhou, 1/6/1874, p. 6)

Nuhou_1_6_1874_6

Ka Nuhou Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 10, Aoao 6. Ianuari 6, 1874.

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