Vital Statistics, 1921.

MARRIAGES.

W. A. P. Cathcart to Martha K. Kaapa, Jan. 13.
Barney Attwood to Hannah Dean, Jan. 22.
Lee Sa Kang to Pricilla Hao, Jan. 24. Continue reading

More on Aunty Elizabeth from Bishop Museum’s post today, 1959.

‘Aunty Elizabeth,’ Kalakaua Ave. Lei-Seller, Dies

Another familiar face in the fast-changing Waikiki scenery passed from view Saturday with the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Hoopii Delovio—”Aunty Elizabeth” to thousands.

The 54-year-old woman and two others were the first to set up a lei stand in Waikiki some 35 years ago. Continue reading

Passing of Benjamin Nalaeelua Kahalepuna, 1937.

B. N. Kahalepuna Called By Death

Was 25 Years In Employ Of Territory

Benjamin N. Kahalepuna, 58, died Monday at his home at 2310 Pauoa road after a brief illness. He was born at Kaneohe, Oahu, September 7, 1879, and had served in the territorial government for more than 25 years.

He was appointed to the bureau of conveyances in 1898 and two years later served as a school teacher. In 1907 he was appointed to a position in the sheriff’s office under Col. Curtis P. Iaukea, and was later given the position of sergeant of police under W. P. Jarrett. Continue reading

On the passing of Mileka Paia, 1920.

AN EXPRESSION OF ALOHA.

MRS. MILEKA PAIA.

To the Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, aloha nui oe:—Please may you be patient in inserting in an open space of the columns of the esteemed newspaper of the lahui so that the many intimates and friends will know, and it shall be the speedy messenger pigeon that carries to all the neighborhoods of our islands, from where the sun arrives at Haehae until where it sets at the base of Lehua, that Mrs. Mileka Paia has passed, the lehua blossom has faded; she sleeps the sleep of summer and winter; the lehua scattering rain of Panaewa will no more sprinkle upon her, the Kanilehua rain will no more mist upon her cheeks, the lehua lei of Olaa will no more adorn her; and following her are mounds of tears being cried for her constantly night and day, while trying to calm the aloha that cannot be calmed, for she is gone, no more will we see her and hear her voice. Auwe, how heart wrenching! Continue reading

Death of Mrs. Lilia Kalama, 1920.

MY DEAR MOTHER, MRS. LILIA KALAMA, HAS PASSED.

Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Please may I ask for you patience and kindness in allowing me some space in the Precious, being that I have a bundle of tears for my dear mama Lilia Kalama, and heavy burden of grief for my dearly beloved, my parent, so that the multitudes, the family, and the friends living from where the sun appears at Kumukahi to where it sets at the base of Lehua, will know.

In midday at 12:30 on Sunday, the 5th of December, the loveless angel of death visited our home in Waiakea Homestead, and took the living breath of my dearly beloved mama, Lilia Kalama, and her eyelids closed, and she slept for all times, and the words of the Holy Book were fulfilled, earth returned to earth, and the soul to God, the one who created it; and left behind us, her children, grandchildren, and family living with unforgettable memories for my dear mother who has gone. Continue reading

Death of Ida Pope, Principal of Kamehameha School for Girls, 1914.

MISS IDA M. POPE DIED IN CHICAGO

Had Been at Home About a Month

SHOCK TO BUCYRUS FRIENDS

Burial to be in Bucyrus Friday Morning, the Remains to Arrive on the Train From Chicago at 9 O’clock—Short Service at the Grave.

Bucyrus friends were shocked to receive a message announcing the death of Miss Ida M. Pope at Chicago, Tuesday evening at 8:40. Mrs. Thomas Jesson received a message from Henry Pope just after noon that Miss Pope had died, and burial would be on the family lot at Bucyrus Friday morning, the remains arriving at 9:09 and proceeding at once to the cemetery where services would be held at 10 o’clock. Continue reading