Death of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani, 1917.

Edward K. Lilikalani Left this Life Behind

On the Fourth of last week, Edward K. Lilikalani left this life at sixty-eight years of age at his home on 415 Queen Street, and on this Sunday his body was carried from Williams’ place [mortuary] for the cemetery of Kawaiahao where the last service will be held over his body by the kahu of Kawaiahao, H. H. Parker. Continue reading

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Short, sweet death announcement for Mekia Keaweamahi, 1912.

THAT OLD FRIEND HAS GONE

On the night of this past Christmas Day which dawned to the 26th, that Hawaiian who was well known by Honolulu’s people, that being Mekia Keaweamahi [Major Keaweamahi], grew weary of this life. He had a stomach ailment. He was a much trusted member of Hui Nalu of Waikiki. He was an old-time kamaaina friend of many here in Honolulu.

(Aloha Aina, 12/28/1912, p. 1)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Decemaba 28, 1912.

Hervey W. Pogue, steel guitarist and violinist, 1938.

MUSICIAN DIES—Hervey W. Pogue, famed steel guitar artist and violinist, died in New York City on September 27. He was born in Maui and was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. William F. Pogue of Haiku, Maui. The elder Pogue was chairman of the Maui board of supervisors for several terms.

(Honolulu Advertiser, 10/16/1938, p. 4)

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Honolulu Advertiser, 83rd Year, Number 18,650, Page 4. October 16, 1938.

Steel guitar teacher, Harvey W. Pogue, passes on, 1938.

EXPIRED

News from New York was received about the passing of Harvey W. Pogue or Pokue in Hawaiian, one of the boys of the Pokue family on Maui, one of the local families of that island; and for a time his father served as the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] for Maui. Continue reading

Death of Joseph Kaaua Kaaa, 1918.

MY HINANO LEI HAS GONE

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Aloha between the two of us strangers:—May it please your honor to welcome my bundle of hinano lei in a open space of your office and it will be you who carries it to the four corners of this globe, so that the family, friends, and the many people of my dear hinano lei, my husband, will know that he has passed on and that he left me and our beloved lei grieving for him in this world.

On Thursday, July 11, 1918, at 4 p. m., my dear Joseph K. Kaaa grew weary of this life and and silently moved on alone to the other side of the dark river of death, leaving me behind, burdened with our beloved lei. Auwe, how pained is my heart! No more is my dear Joseph Kaaua Kaaa, my companion for all places.

O Kukalahale Rain, you will no longer see his eyes, no more will will hear his voice, and he will not tread upon your streets.

Auwe, my sadness and grief for my dear husban who has gone afar; no more will I see his features; no more will I hear his voice; no more, no more for all times!

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Lindsay/Lindsey genealogy found in a death announcement, 1912.

MY BELOVED HUSBAND, MR. THOMAS WESTON LINDSAY, HAS PASSED ON

O Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Please include this parcel of sadness and grief in an empty space of your columns so that my multitudes will know my dear husband has passed, Mr. Thomas Weston Lindsay. Aloha no!

To all my dear family, friends, and intimates, residing from Hawaii to Niihau, from this column you will learn that my beloved kane, Mr. Thomas Weston Lindsay has gone, he left me and all of my family grieving for him with pain, and my heart filled with love for him. Continue reading

Remembering Jules Dudoit, 1866.

The Late Julius Dudoit, Esq.

Seldom does the historian of passing events have a sadder task to perform than when penning obituary notices of his contemporaries; but when the subject of his notice is a person of mark,—of innocent and upright character,—the victim of a dastardly assassin; it becomes a melancholy duty to lay a last mark of esteem upon the tomb of the outraged, especially when venerable for age, and honorable for past services. Continue reading