Hawaiian Halloween in LA, 1937.

WAIKIKI

Commencing
Saturday, Oct. 30

HAWAIIAN HALLOWE’EN
CELEBRATION–for 7 Days
–as in The Islands!

SOL HOOPII’S Orchestra

LENA MACHADO
PRINCE LEI LANI

ALOHA KAIMI Arrives from Honolulu to Join TANI MARSH in Interpretive Hulas!

NO COVER CHARGE

Hawaiian, Chinese and American
Cuisine — Special

DINNER SATURDAY $2.50
All Other Times $1.50

LA BREA AT BEVERLY               York 8183

Try a Poi Cocktail at “Noa-Noa”

(LA Times, 10/30/1937, p. 5)

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Los Angeles Times, Volume LVI. October 30, 1937, p. 5.

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Law on naming, 1863.

Pertaining to Names.

Because we come across all sorts of names, and because we believe that the Law passed on the 24th of August, 1860; that being the Law called, “An Act to regulate names” [“He Kanawai e hooponopono ana i na inoa”] has not been followed, therefore, we wanted to discuss this Important matter with our friends. So that our friends do not fail to recognize this, we print the aforementioned Law, and here it is:

AN ACT
TO REGULATE NAMES.

Be it enacted, By the King, the Nobles and Representatives of the Hawaiian Islands, in Legislative Council assembled:

Section 1. All married women now living, and all that may be married hereafter on these Islands, shall, from and after the passage of this Act, adopt the names o f their husbands as a family  name.

Section 2. All children born in wedlock after the passage of this Act shall have their father’s name as a family name. They shall, besides, have a Christian name suitable to their sex.

Section 3. All illegitimate children born after the passage of this Act shall have their mother’s name as a family name. They shall, besides, have a Christian name suitable to their sex.

Section 4. All children up to the age of twenty years shall adopt the names of their fathers as a family name.

Section 5. All names so adopted shall be reported to the agents appointed to take the census of the people during the present year.

Section 6. It shall not be lawful to change any name adopted or conferred under the law. It shall also not be lawful to change any name adopted or conferred before the operation of this.

Section 7. The father or mother of any child born subsequently to the passage of this Act, shall report the name or names of such child to the Registrar of births for the district in which such child was born, within three months after the birth of such child.

Section 8. This law shall take effect from and after the date of its passage.

Approved this 24th of August, A. D. 1860.

KAMEHAMEHA,
KAAHUMANU.* Continue reading

Pass down the moolelo! 2017.

What are we doing today to carry on the legacy of that writer of moolelo? Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau and his fellow scholars at Lahainaluna were taught to do research and to write down and teach the moolelo of their people.

He says in a response to a critique that alii genealogy was very kapu and was not to be given to anyone else except their own children, “In my opinion, should Kauakahiakaola folks, the genealogists, arise from the realm of po, they will rejoice in this [my telling of chiefly genealogies], for it is gone with them, and they would be happy to see it once more.” (“He wahi ai no ka Nonanona…” Nonanona, 2/14/1843, p. 92)

Pass down the moolelo you do know to the next generation, whether they be family moolelo, or otherwise. Learn more moolelo. Pass them down.

Conclusion of Kamakau’s “Ancient matters…” 1845.

…standing. Then the Hawaiians said, “The haole said that there at Molea at Hamakua is kapu for marking fishes.” Then the Hawaiians shouted, it was as if the haole knew where the fishes were marked!

By S. M. Kamakau.

[Where would we be without Kamakau? Hauoli la hanau ia oe, e Manaiakalani!]

(Elele, 2/10/1846, pp. 180)

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Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 1, Pepa 23, Aoao 180. Feberuari 10,  1846.

Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau, ke kakau moolelo, in his early days, 1845.

SOME ANCIENT MATTERS OF HAWAII NEI.

Lahainaluna, Dec. 10, 1845

When the islands of Hawaii were created by Kumuhonua and his wife Haloiho; when Kumuhonua slept and rose from his sleep, the earth turned and the shaking was called an earthquake [olai].

At that time, the duties were not divided, and names were not given to the many things.

Therefore all things were clarified, animals, birds, crawling things, things with wings that flew in the sky, and men.

Each thing was given its duty, and the duties were clearly divided, appropriate for each living being and the things without the breath of life; this distribution of duties was done at Umauma in Hilo Paliku.

After lands were handed out, along came Halo, who stood beside the river and asked for land for himself. “I want land for myself,” he said to the one giving out land; “You have come when all the land was given out, and there is only one land left.” “Where?” “The polapilau.” “That is my land,” and that land became the land of Halo; completed was the giving of land to those with the breath of life and without the breath of life.

At Molea in Hamakua, that is the place where all the fish of the ocean gathered, the large fish and tiny fish; it was there that all the fish were marked; the stripped ones, the red ones, the white one, the yellow ones, all the different ones in the sea; Kapuhili was the head of those who did the marking; upon all of the unmarked fish, ash was strewn and they became spotted.

All the fishes of the ocean were given its name.

Kumuhonua was the first man, and Haloiho was the first woman. The gods were Ku and Lono.

When Lono (Captain Cook) landed in Hawaii nei. The men went aboard the ship and spoke Hawaiian to the haole; the haole however did not listen to what was spoken; therefore the haole spoke in their language, refusing, without listening. “No more;” so the Hawaiians clarified, “Molea is kapu,” “no more,” “Molea at Hamakua is kapu,” and the haole nodded without under-…

(Elele, 2/10/1846, p. 179)

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Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 1, Pepa 23, Aoao 179. Feberuari 10,  1846.

Hervey W. Pogue, steel guitarist and violinist, 1938.

MUSICIAN DIES—Hervey W. Pogue, famed steel guitar artist and violinist, died in New York City on September 27. He was born in Maui and was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. William F. Pogue of Haiku, Maui. The elder Pogue was chairman of the Maui board of supervisors for several terms.

(Honolulu Advertiser, 10/16/1938, p. 4)

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Honolulu Advertiser, 83rd Year, Number 18,650, Page 4. October 16, 1938.

Steel guitar teacher, Harvey W. Pogue, passes on, 1938.

EXPIRED

News from New York was received about the passing of Harvey W. Pogue or Pokue in Hawaiian, one of the boys of the Pokue family on Maui, one of the local families of that island; and for a time his father served as the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] for Maui. Continue reading