Faith, 1893.

THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE.

The Hawaiian people have faith in the righteousness and the justice of the Americans; therefore they have great trust that Minister Willis will come and make right the outrageous offense that Minister Stevens and Captain Wiltse committed against this upright peoples. Therefore the Americans will dispense justice for Hawaii in 1893 just as Great Britain did too in 1843. Continue reading

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John L. Stevens represents Hawaii in America, 1893.

STEVENS AND HAWAII.

The Ex-Minister Points Out the Advantage of Annexation.

AMERICAN INTEREST LEAD

An Address Before San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, Which Passes Resolution Favoring Annexation.

San Francisco, June 1.—Hon. John L. Stevens, ex-United States minister at Hawaii, addressed the Chamber of Commerce of this city to-day on the subject of “Hawaiian Affairs and Their Relation to the Interest of the United States.” A large number of businessmen were present and gave the speaker an appreciative reception. At the close of the address a resolution was adopted favoring the speedy annexation of the islands. Mr. Stevens, in relating his first impressions upon the islands, said he had not been long in Honolulu before he perceived how thoroughly an American city it was and how predominating were all American interests on the islands. Continuing he said:

He had found an intelligent body of citizens of American and European origin supporting a semi-barbaric monarchy, dead in everything but its vices; coarsely luxuriant in its tastes and wishes and spreading social and political demoralization througout the island.

The speaker then related several incidents in the career of the deposed queen, and charges her not only with personal immorality, but also with having by unconstitutional and arbitrary methods, secured the adoption of certain measures, such as the opium and lottery bills, and recited her attempt to promulgate a new constitution, which finally aroused the respectable element of the community to action. Mr. Stevens then reviewed in detail the circumstances of the revolution and overthrow of the queen last January, and the subsequent establishment of the provisional government. He spoke of the danger of riot and incendiarism at the time of the revolution, the fact that there was no adequate police power in Honolulu, and that an appeal was accordingly made for the landing of men from the United States ship Boston. In this connection, Mr. Stevens said in part:

Under the diplomatic and naval rules, the United States minister and naval commander would have shamefully ignored their duty had they not landed men from the Boston for the security of American life and property and the maintenance of public order, even had the committee of public safety not requested the United States to do so. The Boston’s men stepped not an inch from the line of duty; they never lifted a finger in aid of the fallen monarchy on the rising of the provisional government and all assertions to the contrary, by whomsoever uttered, are audacious falsehoods.

Continue reading

Be vigilant. Just because someone claims to represent you, does that necessarily mean it is so? 1893 / timeless.

HOW IS IT POSSIBLE?

Yes, how can Stevens [John L. Stevens] make himself so brazen and say that his appearance, his voice, and his words—that they represent the Hawaiian people, all the while that that Stevens is in the United States? This is something that is appalling to us, but there are many things that will shock someone, and at times we just want to suppress that feeling, but we cannot, because of how blatant the examples. However, while we may be in shock, the shock of Thurston and his group will greatly surpass this, when they realize that they  met up with the spirit of the waters of Eleile that turn back ti leaves,* and they will realize that the sentiment of the Americans will turn back as well when they hear the truth.

[Many times people don’t pay attention to what is happening outside their own community because they have a job to do, or they have children to care for, or this, or that. Let us be vigilant during these upcoming years. The future generations deserve our attention.]

* See Mary Kawena Pukui’s ʻŌlelo Noʻeau: Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Saying, #1649 about the current in the pool of Eleile which turns back stalks of ti leaves thrown into it by visitors.

(Hawaii Holomua, 2/15/1893, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 160, Aoao 2. Feberuari 15, 1893.

Mele for the Claudine, the vessel that carried the commission of annexationists to Washington DC, 1893.

KELAUDINA SONG.

Kaulana mai nei Kelaudina
Ahailono o ka poe pakaha
Nau i lawe aku na komisina
O ke aupuni kuloko o Hawaii
Hopuhopualulu e ka hele’na
A na elele o ua aupuni nei
E ake ana e hookoia
Ka iini pakaha aina
Halawai aku nei lakou
Me kahi paele a Kalivilana Continue reading

More on the landing of the Boston, 1893.

Of What Are They Afraid?

Editor Bulletin:—

The Advertiser this morning says: “The landing of the troops from the Boston furnishes a guarantee that the persons and property of American citizens will be safe from violence, etc.” What are those who claim to be American citizens afraid of? From what quarter is violence expected? None whatever, except like Banquo’s ghost,¹ from the “deep shadows of cowardly and guilty consciences.” It would be well under present circumstances, for the Advertiser to come forward and state to the public who were the ones that forced the late King at the point of the bayonet to break his oath and forswear the late constitution that he had sworn to uphold?

An American.

¹Reference to Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

(Daily Bulletin, 1/17/1893, p. 3)

DailyBulletin_1_17_1893_3

The Daily Bulletin, Volume V, Number 626, Page 3. January 17, 1893.

 

 

Invasion, 1893.

The American Troops Landed.

Without knowledge of the Government, and with agreement from the American Minister [Stevens] not to land the troops from the warship while the Government is prepared to keep peace; the American Minister nonetheless ordered the troops of the Boston to be  put in service. This would appear as if it is an attack, and should the government [provisional government] listen to the truth of these actions by its official, this will be something that it will condemn.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/17/1893, p. 2)

LeookaLahui_1_17_1893_2

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 624, Aoao 2. Ianuari 17, 1893.

The U. S. S. Boston, John L. Stevens, and the Hawaiian flag, 1893.

PROTECTORATE.

At nine o’clock this morning, and since the editorial matter of The Liberal was in type, the United States flag was hoisted upon the Capitol by Captain Wiltse of the U. S. S. Boston and a United States Protectorate was proclaimed over the Hawaiian Islands in the name of the American Government, pending negotiations now going on at Washington. The troops saluted the American flag first and immediately thereafter faced about and saluted the Hawaiian flag. The following is the text of the proclamation:

TO THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE.

At the request of the Provisional Government of the Hawaiian Islands, I hereby, in the name of the United States of America, assume the protection of the Hawaiian Islands for the protection of life and property, and occupation of the public buildings and Hawaiian soil, so far as may be necessary for the purpose of specified, but not interfering with the administration of public affairs by the Provisional Government.

This action is taken pending, and subject to, negotiations at Washington.

John L. Stevens,

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States.

United States Legation, February 1, 1893.

Approved and executed by

G. C. Wiltse, Captain U. S. N.

Commanding the United States Ship “Boston.”

(Liberal, 2/1/1893, p. 2)

PROTECTORATE.

The Liberal, Volume I, Number 41, Page 2. February 1, 1893.