On kalo, poi, and life, 1901.

Kalo

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FARMING KALO.

When considering how we Hawaiians are being supplied with poi, there is not the slightest indication that the cost of our staple food will decrease, and it is also very clear that if what has happened in the past years continues on into the upcoming years, and we continue relying on the Chinese for our supply, it is obvious that the price of poi will shoot up, and we will not be able to eat poi.

As a result of the increase in the price of rice, the former taro lands are being planted with rice, and should the rice market continue to be favorable, then a majority of the Chinese will abandon taro and become rice farmers, then, the cost of kalo will skyrocket, and as a result, so too will the price of poi.

Therefore, in our opinion, Hawaiians should start farming kalo, and obtain its…

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History of Kawaiahao Church, 1885.

Are you watching what some of the influences of missionaries were on tv? 2020.
https://youtu.be/nJOTS81wErQ

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KAWAIAHAO CHURCH

The readers of the Kuokoa will probably not be unable to recognize the features of the building pictured above; it is the church of Kawaiahao. It is an old building and one that is greatly beloved by a portion of our people, this mother church of ours. Its predecessor on these grounds was a church of pili grass; and the stone building was completed in 1842, constructed by the loving hands of the alii and makaainana of times gone by. It was Kekuanaoa and Bingham [Binamu] Sr. who selected the area where it was to be built and supervised its construction, however Bingham returned to America before the completion of this building.

There were many renowned events which were done in Kawaiahao such that it is as if the building was the place to carry out grand and fine deeds of the past, of the nation and the…

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Reforesting Puu Ohia, Oahu, 1900.

Reforestation, 1900.
Happy Earth Day!

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PERTAINING TO GROWING SANDALWOOD.

On the return of Governor Dole from his travels to Hawaii, he brought back some seed of trees growing in the mountains of that island to grow here on the ridges of Puu Ohia [Tantalus]. Among these were koa and iliahi seeds. This tree, the iliahi, will be increased; it was believed no longer existing on these islands because of abuse during the days of Kamehameha I. However, it is said that there is a great number of these trees growing in the mountains of Molokai. From here forth, the government will try to care well for these ancient tree of the land.

(Aloha Aina, 8/25/1900, p. 5)

NO KA HOOULU ANA I NA LAAU ILIAHI. Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 34, Aoao 5. Augate 25, 1900.

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Lorenzo Lyons’ composition on patriotism, 1868.

Lorenzo Lyons’ mele on patriotism in 1868.

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ALOHA AINA.

THE TRUE PATRIOT.

Golden Censer.

1. Paa kuu manao aloha
Yes, yes, yes yes, yes, yes.
Paa kuu manao aloha
I ka aina hanau o’u.
Aole au e kipi,
No, no, no, no, no, no.
Aole kumakaia,
E aloha oia mau.
Kuu lima pu me kuu naau,
E lilo nona, nona mau,
Kuu lima pu me kuu naau
E lilo nona mau.

Cho.—Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes,
Paa kuu manao aloha
Yes, yes, &c
Paa kuu manao aloha
I ka aina hanau o’u;
Aole au e kipi,
No, no, &c
Aole kumakaia,
E aloha oia mau.

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Response to “uneducated Haole in the art of Hula,” 1971.

Readers Forum

Hula Festival

Editor, The Tribune-Herald:

The obviously sincere, and marvelously “uneducated Haole in the art of Hula” who took me to task (Readers Forum 5/9) should spend a little time in research and study before he seeks to comment on anything connected with the Hawaiian culture. However:

1—I did sincerely regret the time necessary to tune my guitar; my 3-year old had, apparently, been ‘helping’ me tune just prior to our performance; Continue reading