Heroes, 1966.

These four boys rescued two youths from drowning in California a week ago. They are from left, Robert L. Kuhaulua, George K. Kupihe, Melvin D. Kalahiki and Robert K. Brown.—Photo by Pan American.

Isle job corpsmen save two from drowning on W. Coast

The rescue of two Santa Rosa, California, youths from drowning at Salmon Creek Beach a week ago today was told by four returning job corpsmen yesterday.

The corpsmen, who returned with 11 others from California on a Pan American plane, were Robert L. Kuhaulua, George K. Kupihe, Melvin D. Kalahiki and Robert K. Brown. Continue reading

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Terrorism even here? 1926.

KNIFE USED AS NAIL TO AFFIX NOTE ON DOOR

The Ku Klux Klan Association is here in this town according to Maurice Rey, the owner of a hair salon on Emma Street. According to the claim of Rey before Detective Kellett, this past Saturday, he found a warning of troubles that would be carried out upon him, and for that reason he wanted to be put under the protection of the police force, and he also asked that he be protected from wrongdoings by a group of degenerates seen often in his area.

When he went to his place of work in the morning of this past Saturday, the first thing his eyes saw was a note on the door affixed by a knife painted red, the paint still fresh on the knife. These are the words written on the note. “Mr. Freitchie, Do not let the sun set upon you in this town. BEWARE, K. K. K.”

The police department is in charge of being vigilant against this type of terroristic activity, and they will try to search out and arrest the Imperial Wizard of the Klan living here in this town.

[Stand up against cowardly acts of bullying and terrorism.]

(Kuokoa, 11/18/1926, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXV, Helu 46, Aoao 2. Novemaba 18, 1926.

The newspapers may not always report “the truth,” but they are a priceless source for historical information, 1864, Today, and Tomorrow.

The newspapers are someplace we should be looking at for other ways to look at Hawaiian history.

Newspapers, unlike books were relatively easy to come by (whether it was by subscription, or by sharing with a neighbor).

Most people could not afford to publish books, but many people had the means to purchase pen and paper and envelope and stamp, so that they could send in their thoughts to be printed. And many in fact did. They wanted the truth as they knew it to be known by all. And because newspapers were printed regularly, it was easy to immediately comment on errors appearing in the pages of the paper. There are often heated debates over everything and anything from genealogy, to mele, to why you should not lend money to that man or woman who left a marriage bed. These debates not only took place in a single newspaper title, but often ran in totally different newspapers and sometimes even in both Hawaiian and English publications.

The information given by S. W. B. Kaulainamoku appearing in the previous post for instance is contested a month later by P. S. Pakele. He says, “…it is for you all to see which one is true, with my thought that perhaps the one who published earlier is right, and perhaps not; the same with this, perhaps it is right, and perhaps not; my confidence is with you all.”

Many generations of Hawaiians contributed information to the newspapers, because they knew that the information they submitted was not only for them at the time but more importantly for Hawaiians of today and tomorrow.

How bad leaders and their advisers were dealt with in Kaʻū, 1890.

INCIDENTS IN HAWAIIAN HISTORY.

Before Kamehameha the First had reduced the island of Hawaii to his subjection the various districts were ruled over by petty kings or high chiefs. Anecdotes of three of these aliis who successively ruled over the large district of Kau, are still current among the natives. They are not mythical, but actual events.

Koihala the alii of Kau was about making a voyage from Kona to Kau in his fleet of canoes. He sent word to his people of Kau to meet him with supplies of food on a certain day at Kapua.

The people cooked hogs, dogs and potatoes and prepared poi, water in calabashes and other supplies in sufficient quantities for the chief and his retainers, and started afoot with their burdens to meet him. On arriving at Kapua the fleet came along but did not stop. The alii called to the people ashore to go back to the next landing towards South Point. They resumed their burdens and retraced their steps to this place, the king proceeding by sea. At this place they were told to go on still further to another landing. This was repeated several times and they were finally told to climb the steep pali and meet the king at Kaalualu around and east of South Point. The people were tired, foot sore and hungry from their wearisome travel over the lava and determined upon a different reception to their alii from what he expected. They said “we will teach these chiefs a lesson not to wear us out with their capricious whims. We are hungry and we will eat the food and give him another article of diet instead.” So they sat down and ate up the food and filled the ti-leaf containers with stones and proceeded to near the coast and sat on a slight hill to await the coming of the chief and his party. He landed and proceeded up the ascent to receive his hookupu (tribute of food). When near, the people stood up and, taking the stones from the containers, threw them at the king and his retainers saying, “Here is your pig,” “Here is your dog,” “Here are your potatoes,” etc., and Koihala was killed. The stone, a short way on the road from Kaalualu to Waiohinu is still pointed out as the exact spot where Koihala—the exacting tyrant—met his death. Continue reading

More Hokulea past, 1975.

Keaulana: ‘It was beautiful.’

First cruise proves craft a humdinger

By BUNKY BAKUTIS
Advertiser Staff Writer

After the dust had settled from the day’s ceremony and the crew relaxed around beer coolers and luau food, Buffalo Keaulana, one of the two steersmen for the sailing canoe’s maiden voyage, summed up the brief cruise: “It was beautiful.

“It (the canoe) turned real easy. And when the paddling was right and the canoe was moving, it was a breeze to handle,” said Keaulana, who has been practicing sailing a smaller version of the double-hulled canoe this past year in preparation for the Tahiti trip.

SOME OF THE PADDLERS for yesterday’s ceremonial cruise into Kaneohe Bay also sung the craft’s praises. Continue reading

Another mele for Kilauea Lighthouse, 1919.

In the Helen Roberts audio collection at the Bishop Museum, it seems that there is an actual recording of Wahinekeaouli Pa performing this mele! [Haw 1.5a, track ] Wow.

nupepa

HE MELE NO KA HALE KUKUI O KILAUEA.

HALE IPUKUKUI O KILAUEA, KAUAI.

Nani wale ka uwila i Kilauea,
E anapa mai la i ka paia lani;
Hoike mai ana i kona nani,
He malamalama oi kelakela;
Helu ekahi a o Hawaii nei.
Ma ka lihi kai o ka Pakipika;
Ua ana pono ia kona enekini,
No kanaha mile kona mamao;
Kaomi lima ia iho ke pihi,
E niniu ia no umi kekona;
Hihiu na hana a ka Puakea,
He oi pakela a ke akamai;
I hana noeau ia e Palani,
Me na waihooluu like ole;
He kinohinohi ke ike aku,
Ka anapa a ka onohi kaimana,
Ua hanaia a ku i ka nani,
Molina wai gula anapanapa;
Ka papa dala ke kahua ia,
Ka hulali a ka wai hoohinuhinu;
Ua kohu lihilihi anuenue,
Ka alohi, ka anapa ke ike aku,
Haina ia mai ana ka puana,
Hale kukui nani…

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