Anybody try out that Duolingo yet? What do you think? Okatoba 8, 2018.

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Ah, it is “limitations in displaying the Hawaiian diacritical markings accurately on various computer operating systems,” 2018.

Due to limitations in displaying the Hawaiian diacritical markings accurately on various computer operating systems and to ensure integrity of the information, the okina and kahako used in Hawaiian words have been excluded from all copy that appears on this website. Continue reading

Words of advice from a concerned Hawaiian, 1944.

SINGING HAWAIIAN SONGS

Editor The Advertiser:

As a Hawaiian I enjoy listening to the sweet Hawaiian music on my radio from 7:30 a.m. to midnight. But I agree with many other Hawaiians who I have heard complain about our young peoples singing nowadays. Perhaps there might be a way to help these young generation and also the future generations keep up the proper way of singing our beloved Hawaiian songs and not to murder them or change them as they are being changed by jazzing or perhaps boogle them. Why not keep them as the composer intended to express their feelings. For example the song, “Kahuahuai.” It is not a war chant. It’s a love song telling of their love for each other and how they had weathered the cold together among the fragranted ferns, etc. Continue reading

Edward Kahale, new Hawaiian language instructor at UH, 1945.

Appointed to Position

We received the happy news that Rev. Edward Kahale, the kahu of Kawaiahao Church, was appointed as Hawaiian language instructor at the University of Hawaii. He will start when the Government School start in the coming Fall, and he will take the place of Professor Henry P. Judd (Kauka), who will leave the position on the last day of August of this year. Continue reading

Not just February, 1938, Today, Tomorrow.

Need to Care For

A petition was put before the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] of Maui on this past Monday, May 15, and it was about the obvious truth of the sad acknowledgement by the kamaaina of Hawaii, about the quiet decline of the Hawaiian language.

This document was sent from Molokai, one of the bastions of the old Hawaiians, and the document was written in the Hawaiian language, and it is something important taken and considered by the members of the board, the press, and others who went to observe the meeting. Continue reading

Suggests back a suggestion to Maui News, 1903.

We do not need any of your sarcasm, Mr. Man of the Maui News. It may have been well meant, yet we fail to see it in that light, for “scholarly” we do not claim to be, but surely, we are “scholarly” as far as our own mother tongue is concerned, which is something that you, aged malihini, cannot touch nor express yourself upon.

Continue reading