O Feberuari ka malama olelo Hawaii, 2019.

O Maraki kekahi, Aperila, Mei, Iune, Iulai, Augate, Sepatemaba, Okatoba, Novemaba, Dekemaba, a Ianuari hoi. O ka makahiki no a puni.

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On Hawaiianization of foreign words, 1869.

The Hawaiian language, when the Islands were first discovered by Europeans, was of course adapted only to the simple wants of the people. With the introduction of new facts to the knowledge of the people and the development of new ideas, it was necessary to get words to express them—as for instance, pepa, was merely the word “paper,” spelled on the phonetic plan. Continue reading

Ah, it is “limitations in displaying the Hawaiian diacritical markings accurately on various computer operating systems,” 2018.

Due to limitations in displaying the Hawaiian diacritical markings accurately on various computer operating systems and to ensure integrity of the information, the okina and kahako used in Hawaiian words have been excluded from all copy that appears on this website. Continue reading

Words of advice from a concerned Hawaiian, 1944.

SINGING HAWAIIAN SONGS

Editor The Advertiser:

As a Hawaiian I enjoy listening to the sweet Hawaiian music on my radio from 7:30 a.m. to midnight. But I agree with many other Hawaiians who I have heard complain about our young peoples singing nowadays. Perhaps there might be a way to help these young generation and also the future generations keep up the proper way of singing our beloved Hawaiian songs and not to murder them or change them as they are being changed by jazzing or perhaps boogle them. Why not keep them as the composer intended to express their feelings. For example the song, “Kahuahuai.” It is not a war chant. It’s a love song telling of their love for each other and how they had weathered the cold together among the fragranted ferns, etc. Continue reading