Journal of Evelyn Desha and Stephen Desha Jr., 1943.

Our Day

THE CALM SEAS OF KONA

The person who helps me in all sorts of chores at home is Nellie Kakutani. She is a pleasant girl and lively at work.

And these days what we are doing is cooking guava jelly [puhi kele kuawa]. The guava here in Kona is very ripe. There are two types of jelly we are making. One jelly is dark red, and the other is yellowish. The difference comes with the heat at which you cook it. If you want dark red, you cook with on medium heat. So you cook it for a long time. And should you want yellowish jelly, then you cook it on high heat. And you cook it for a short time.

There is a butter shortage, so this is advice to the women of the home; if you haven’t cooked your jelly, you should start these days, right.

On Thursday, the ninth of November, there was a meeting of the members of the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] and some other members of the County of Hawaii and some citizens of Kona nei, at the meeting house of Central Kona Union Church that is under the care of Rev. Stephen Desha of Kealakekua. They discussed the Appropriations [Bila Haawina] of the County of Hawaii pertaining to matters here in Kona. They decided to set aside funds for schools, hospitals, and roads. This was one of the few times where the members of the Board of Supervisors met with the citizens of Kona to talk about the well-being of this district. Praise goes to the members of the Board of Supervisors and the other members of Hawaii County.

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There are many visitors here in Kona these days. Here with us these days are Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mahi, the daughter-in-law of our elder sister, Mrs. May Haae. This is the first time that Mrs. Mahi has come to Hawaii and to here in Kona. With them came their baby son, Mosely. We took them around sight seeing.

The other day we took the two of them to Kailua and Keauhou. Yesterday we took them to Napoopoo, to our home by the sea. Mr. Mahi is adept at spearfishing, and he caught some fish. My companion caught the sweet-eyed kole. The fish were fried and eaten for lunch. We went to seethe monument to Opukahaia at the cove of Kealakekua.

Today they went to see some of their friends here in Kona.

The women of Kona held a prayer meeting called “The Church Wide Day of Prayer.” This assembly was held at the Episcopal Church, Christ Church, of Kealakekua. The Japanese, Chinese, Hawaiians and Haole participated. After the meeting, a celebration was held, and everyone joined in at the U. S. O. Hall.

[This is a series that seems to continue after another called “Ko’u La” written by Evelyn Desha. I believe that “Ko Maua La: Na Kaimalino” is also written by her about her daily life with Stephen Langhern Desha, Jr.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/4/1943, p. 1)

Ko Maua La

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVIII, Number 32, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 4, 1943.

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More on Jack Desha, 1912.

KIWINI HAS A GRANDCHILD.

Amongst the youth of Hawaii nei who are pursuing education who have gone to “Foreign Lands” [Aina E], one of them is the son of our friend, Rev. Stephen Desha. He left for Harvard College. This Hawaiian youth lived at the home of the parents of a girl by the name of Miss Agnes Reddy, in Medford, Massachusetts. This Hawaiian youth was enraptured with this young lady. With all the might in the young Desha, he asked the father of the woman who he was taken with to agree that there be the bond of holy matrimony between him and his daughter. The father of the young lady refused, that his daughter could not marry a Protestant being that this family was of the Catholic faith.

So the two young ones fled to Nashua, New Hampshire, without the parents of the woman or anyone else knowing about it. And there they were wed; then they went before her father and revealed to him of their marriage. The father told them that they must have a Catholic marriage. This was carried out. The day they were were wed was on New Year’s Day, of the year 1910, and on the 11th of Dec., 1910, they had their baby. She was named Evalina C. M. Desha.

The schoolmates of young Desha had no idea that living amongst them was a boy that was married and had a large baby; until the next New Year’s Day, when for the first time that the knowledge-seeking Hawaiian announced it outright before his schoolmates.

We hear that the young Desha will enter into Medical School.

(Aloha Aina, 7/13/1912, p. 1)

KANI MOOPUNA NO O KIWINI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII Helu 28, Aoao 1. Iulai 13, 1912.

Hawaiians at Harvard, 1908 / 2014.

A Letter From Lands Afar

Cambridge, Mass.,
Nov. 4, 1908.

My beloved father;

For a long time now I have not received a letter from you, and I assume you are in the midst of political battles. I am very interested in the results of the election over there, and I hope very much that you were elected. Please, papa, tell me what became of the elections there. There was not much of great import in the elections here being that it was known in advance that Taft would come out as the new President of America. Taft was elected victoriously, and he was far ahead of his fellow candidates, and maybe you all have heard before the arrival of this letter of mine.

The parade of the Republicans on this past Friday before election day was one of the grandest seen here in the town of Boston. Thousands of students from the colleges joined in this parade, and students from our school, Harvard were out first leading the parade, and I was one among the students marching in this parade beyond compare. We were dressed in crimson caps of the college of Harvard with the school uniform, and each student held a candle in his hand, and the old town of Boston glowed red in its light. The candle-light parade was 11 miles long. We marched on the streets of town, and when we arrived before the Governor, we removed our crimson caps and gave our greetings to the Governor. This was a great parade indeed, and everything went well. It was a Republican Governor that was elected yesterday. Continue reading

A. Kaumu Hanchett studying at Harvard, 1914.

HAWAII IS PROUD OF THIS NATIVE HAWAIIAN

At the Medical School of Harvard University, a Hawaiian named A. Kaumu Hanchett is learning Medicine; in an examination of the medical students in Boston, in order to enter one of the Hospitals of the City, and from amongst a 100 students, the Hawaiian boy ranked 3rd, and because this Hawaiian Boy wanted to once again test his competence, his Medical abilities were tested once again at a big Hospital in Providence in the State of Rhode Island, and what was revealed in that examination was that amongst 50  students who took the test, to the Hawaii boy went “Number One.” He is a brother [hoahanau] of the Deputy Sheriff [Crowell] of the District of Waimea on Kauai, and he was a Classmate of the children of S. L. Desha at Kamehameha School and Punahou School, and he entered Harvard University with a son of Desha’s. This Hawaiian boy will graduate in this coming June, and will intern for two years at one of the Famous Hospitals of America to advance his abilities in the medical field, and at the completion of his stay at the  Hospital, then he will select where he will practice his calling.

We hope that he will come back to Hawaii nei to practice this greatest of occupations in which he trained, and be the first Hawaiian to practice medicine in here in Hawaii.

[On page 295 of the Harvard Alumni Directory for 1910, you will find Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett [c 1907–10, A.B. 1911(10).] Waimea, Kauai, Hawaii.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/21/1914, p. 2)

HAAHEO O HAWAII I KEIA OIWI HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 8, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Mei 21, 1914.

Goat hunting on Kahoolawe, 1911.

Goat Hunters to go to Kahoolawe.

Aboard the Maunaloa of this Friday, Governor Frear, Attorney General Lindsey [Lindsay], and Land Commissioner Alapaki opio [Charles Sheldon Judd] left for the island of Hawaii to look at the homestead lands there. On this trip, the Governor took along an automobile for them to travel mauka side of Hawaii. They get off at Kailua and get on the car to go to Kau, and from there to the volcano until Hilo and from there to Kohala until Waimea, and in two weeks the Maunakea will be there in Kawaihae and they will return to Honolulu nei. On this tour of the Governor and his companions, they will meet with the…

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, p. 1)

NA POE KI KAO NO KAHOOLAWE.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

makaainana who want homestead lands, to ask them first-hand what lands the public desires.

Attorney General Lindsey and Alapaki will make the return trip to Honolulu while Governor Frear will get off at Lahaina, and there meet up with Eben Low, Kuhio, and Kiwini [S. L. Desha], as well as with some other people, to go to Kahoolawe to judge the damages done by the goats, and if they are found at fault, shooting will be their punishment.

The long-distance steamship, the Kaena, will go to Lahaina on the 21st of this month, and by the Kaena the selected jury will go to Kahoolawe.

[See this related story, “Brother Low Recalls 1895–1920” on Hamakua Times’ website!]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, pp. 4)

KA POE KI KAO

Kuokoa Homer Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.