Dr. Kaumu Hanchett graduates from medical school in Boston, 1916.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko.”]

Do not forget to look at the other column in our paper where you will see information about Dr. Kaumu Hanchett graduating from medical school in Boston. He will open a medical office for himself soon on Alakea Street. Go see for yourself; he is a true Hawaiian born on Kauai. Go! Go all of you!

(Aloha Aina, 12/22/1916, p. 4)

AlohaAina_12_22_1916_4.png

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 10, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 22, 1916.

More on Jack Desha, 1912.

KIWINI HAS A GRANDCHILD.

Amongst the youth of Hawaii nei who are pursuing education who have gone to “Foreign Lands” [Aina E], one of them is the son of our friend, Rev. Stephen Desha. He left for Harvard College. This Hawaiian youth lived at the home of the parents of a girl by the name of Miss Agnes Reddy, in Medford, Massachusetts. This Hawaiian youth was enraptured with this young lady. With all the might in the young Desha, he asked the father of the woman who he was taken with to agree that there be the bond of holy matrimony between him and his daughter. The father of the young lady refused, that his daughter could not marry a Protestant being that this family was of the Catholic faith.

So the two young ones fled to Nashua, New Hampshire, without the parents of the woman or anyone else knowing about it. And there they were wed; then they went before her father and revealed to him of their marriage. The father told them that they must have a Catholic marriage. This was carried out. The day they were were wed was on New Year’s Day, of the year 1910, and on the 11th of Dec., 1910, they had their baby. She was named Evalina C. M. Desha.

The schoolmates of young Desha had no idea that living amongst them was a boy that was married and had a large baby; until the next New Year’s Day, when for the first time that the knowledge-seeking Hawaiian announced it outright before his schoolmates.

We hear that the young Desha will enter into Medical School.

(Aloha Aina, 7/13/1912, p. 1)

KANI MOOPUNA NO O KIWINI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII Helu 28, Aoao 1. Iulai 13, 1912.

It seems that Jack was not all work and no play, 1912.

Desha Elopes, Weds; Keeps Secret 2 Years

Jack Desha of Hawaii, Harvard’s star baseball player, marries girl of his choice despite opposition of stern parent. Two ceremonies held, and he becomes proud father before his classmates learn the story that he has long left the ranks of single men.

—Photo by Perkins.

Harvard Hears News When He Presents a Candidate for Class Baby

Jack Desha of Hilo and Harvard, famed as a football and baseball player, is a benedict. Further than this, he entered the ranks of married men two years ago by way of an elopement with the daughter of his landlord and was married on New Year’s Day, 1910. It may also be stated that Jack Desha has been a proud father since December 11, 1910, when Evelyn C. M. Desha came into the world.

Friends of Jack Desha in the Hawaiian Islands need not feel disappointed or grieved at the fact that the young athlete failed to confide in them, for it appears that the members of his own class at Harvard, that of 1912, knew nothing about it until Desha as a candidate for the class baby, to which position she was at once elected by the class. Continue reading

Hawaiians at Harvard, 1908 / 2014.

A Letter From Lands Afar

Cambridge, Mass.,
Nov. 4, 1908.

My beloved father;

For a long time now I have not received a letter from you, and I assume you are in the midst of political battles. I am very interested in the results of the election over there, and I hope very much that you were elected. Please, papa, tell me what became of the elections there. There was not much of great import in the elections here being that it was known in advance that Taft would come out as the new President of America. Taft was elected victoriously, and he was far ahead of his fellow candidates, and maybe you all have heard before the arrival of this letter of mine.

The parade of the Republicans on this past Friday before election day was one of the grandest seen here in the town of Boston. Thousands of students from the colleges joined in this parade, and students from our school, Harvard were out first leading the parade, and I was one among the students marching in this parade beyond compare. We were dressed in crimson caps of the college of Harvard with the school uniform, and each student held a candle in his hand, and the old town of Boston glowed red in its light. The candle-light parade was 11 miles long. We marched on the streets of town, and when we arrived before the Governor, we removed our crimson caps and gave our greetings to the Governor. This was a great parade indeed, and everything went well. It was a Republican Governor that was elected yesterday. Continue reading

Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett from “The Story of Hawaii and Its Builders,” 1925.

ALSOBERRY KAUMU HANCHETT

City and County Physician

Member of a kamaaina family, Dr. A. K. Hanchett has been city and county physician of Honolulu since 1918. In practice he specializes in surgery.

Born in Lihue, Kauai, Nov. 16, 1885, Dr. Hanchett is the son of S. P. and Julia (Palaile) Hanchett. His grandfather, Salem Hanchett, located on the Island of Kauai in the early 40’s, coming to Hawaii from Massachusetts as captain of a whaling vessel.

Dr. Hanchett received his early education in Honolulu at the Kamehameha Schools. He received and A. B. degree at Harvard University in 1911, and, continuing his studies in the medical college of the same institution, took his M. D. degree in 1914. Dr. Hanchett entered private practise at Providence, R. I., remaining there for two years and returned to Hawaii in 1916. During the World War he was a major in the Medical Corps, stationed at Schofield Barracks and Fort Shafter.

Dr. Hanchett and Mary McGuire were married in Honolulu in 1917. They have four sons, Edwin Lani, William Kaumu, John Ikua and Richard Palea Hanchett. He is a member of the Medical Association of Hawaii, University and Civic Clubs of Honolulu.

[This comes from another awesome resource: The Story of Hawaii and Its Builders, with which is incorporated volume III Men of Hawaii; an historical outline of Hawaii with biographical sketches of its men of note and substantial achievement, past and present, who have contributed to the progress of the Territory, edited by George F. Nellist. Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Ltd., 1925. It is available in text form (minus the many picture portraits) here at the Hawaii USGenWeb Archives.]

(Story of Hawaii and Its Builders, 1925.)

Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett

The Story of Hawaii and Its Builders, p. 487

Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett, Kauai boy, becomes a doctor, 1914.

ANOTHER KAUAI BOY MAKES GOOD

A. H. Hanchett who is a Lihue boy, born in a house on the site of the present bowling alley, will graduate from the medical department of Harvard at the end of this month and will, on July 1, enter upon his duties as interne of a great hospital at Providence, R. I. He stood an examination, with 56 others, for that place and came out first best.

Young Hanchett’s father still lives on Kauai, at Waimea; and he is a half brother of W. O. Crowell, of Waimea. Prior to leaving the Islands, he graduated from both Kamehameha school and Oahu College. He next took a four-years course in Harvard, graduating A. B.; after which he took up the medical course, which he is now about to complete.

It is Dr. Hanchett’s hope and present intention to return to the Islands as soon as his two-year term with the Providence hospital is completed.

(Garden Island, 6/9/1914, p. 2)

ANOTHER KAUAI BOY MAKES GOOD

The Garden Island, Volume 10, Number 22, Page 2. June 9, 1914.

A. Kaumu Hanchett studying at Harvard, 1914.

HAWAII IS PROUD OF THIS NATIVE HAWAIIAN

At the Medical School of Harvard University, a Hawaiian named A. Kaumu Hanchett is learning Medicine; in an examination of the medical students in Boston, in order to enter one of the Hospitals of the City, and from amongst a 100 students, the Hawaiian boy ranked 3rd, and because this Hawaiian Boy wanted to once again test his competence, his Medical abilities were tested once again at a big Hospital in Providence in the State of Rhode Island, and what was revealed in that examination was that amongst 50  students who took the test, to the Hawaii boy went “Number One.” He is a brother [hoahanau] of the Deputy Sheriff [Crowell] of the District of Waimea on Kauai, and he was a Classmate of the children of S. L. Desha at Kamehameha School and Punahou School, and he entered Harvard University with a son of Desha’s. This Hawaiian boy will graduate in this coming June, and will intern for two years at one of the Famous Hospitals of America to advance his abilities in the medical field, and at the completion of his stay at the  Hospital, then he will select where he will practice his calling.

We hope that he will come back to Hawaii nei to practice this greatest of occupations in which he trained, and be the first Hawaiian to practice medicine in here in Hawaii.

[On page 295 of the Harvard Alumni Directory for 1910, you will find Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett [c 1907–10, A.B. 1911(10).] Waimea, Kauai, Hawaii.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/21/1914, p. 2)

HAAHEO O HAWAII I KEIA OIWI HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 8, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Mei 21, 1914.