E o, e Kauikeaouli, ka Moi Lokomaikai, 1921.

COMMEMORATING THE DAY OF BIRTH OF KAUIKEAOULI.

At Kawaiahao Church, on the morning of this coming Sunday, March 13, a memorial assembly for the birthday of King Kamehameha III (Kauikeaouli) will be held, under the direction of the Ahahui o na Mamakakaua. Continue reading

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A. Kaumu Hanchett studying at Harvard, 1914.

HAWAII IS PROUD OF THIS NATIVE HAWAIIAN

At the Medical School of Harvard University, a Hawaiian named A. Kaumu Hanchett is learning Medicine; in an examination of the medical students in Boston, in order to enter one of the Hospitals of the City, and from amongst a 100 students, the Hawaiian boy ranked 3rd, and because this Hawaiian Boy wanted to once again test his competence, his Medical abilities were tested once again at a big Hospital in Providence in the State of Rhode Island, and what was revealed in that examination was that amongst 50  students who took the test, to the Hawaii boy went “Number One.” He is a brother [hoahanau] of the Deputy Sheriff [Crowell] of the District of Waimea on Kauai, and he was a Classmate of the children of S. L. Desha at Kamehameha School and Punahou School, and he entered Harvard University with a son of Desha’s. This Hawaiian boy will graduate in this coming June, and will intern for two years at one of the Famous Hospitals of America to advance his abilities in the medical field, and at the completion of his stay at the  Hospital, then he will select where he will practice his calling.

We hope that he will come back to Hawaii nei to practice this greatest of occupations in which he trained, and be the first Hawaiian to practice medicine in here in Hawaii.

[On page 295 of the Harvard Alumni Directory for 1910, you will find Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett [c 1907–10, A.B. 1911(10).] Waimea, Kauai, Hawaii.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/21/1914, p. 2)

HAAHEO O HAWAII I KEIA OIWI HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 8, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Mei 21, 1914.

Kuhio’s “Four Horsemen,” a translation from the time! 1939.

The Four Horsemen

The above picture was taken at Honolulu a few years before the passage of the Rehabilitation Law. There were four of these Hawaiians, and a few days after the return of the Delegate Prince Kuhio from Washington, assembled at Pualeilani at Waikiki to discuss the subject “Rehabilitation of the Hawaiians and after that discussion, these men went to town and had their picture taken at the William’s Gallery on Fort Street, as it was the Prince’s wish, so that he can show to his fellow congressmen at Washington his backers that brought up this important matter for rehabilitating its people, known to be decreasing, during the session of the Hawaii legislature, if the measure is allowed by congress. They are sitting. Prince Kuhio, standing, from left to right, Rev. S. L. Desha, Sr., John C. Lane and H. L. Holstein.

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Death of Z. P. K. Kalokuokamaile, 1942.

A Man Has Just Passed.

“A man!”

“What?”

“Has just passed!”

“WHO?”

“Z. P. Kalokuokamaile! He has gone on the road of no return; he has taken the path all must ake; he has grown weary of this worldly life; and his spirit has returned to the one who made all people; and his body has returned to the mother earth.

“Yes, one of the long-living men of Napoopoo, Hawaii has passed; and he is the last of the oldsters of that famed land at the base of the acclaimed cliff known as Kapalikapuokeoua. Z. K. Kalokuokamaile grew weary of this world at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Annie Keawe at 93 years and 4 months and a little more in age. The Heavenly Father had much aloha for this good man; he was just a few years away from reaching a century. He left this world in the afternoon of Tuesday, September 1, 1942.

His mind was strong when he grew weary; it was clear when conversing with him.

Mr. Z. P. Kalokuokamaile was born from the loins of Naili (m) and Kawaha (f) at Napoopoo, South Kona, Hawaii, on the 13th of March 1849, and he was 93 years four months and a little more in age.

He was educated at Lahainaluna School and graduated from there and made a living as a teacher at the school of Keei.

From his marriage, he had two children, they being Naili (m) who is living in Honolulu, and Mrs. Annie Keawe of Hilo, and he has just two grandchildren.

At a time in his life, he became a Sunday School principal, and a Sunday School teacher for the father’s class of the Napoopoo Church.

Z. P. Kaloku was a man who was in the class of experts at searching for the obscure information of the press of Ka Hoku o Hawaii. He was an expert at posing riddles [nane] as well as in the solving of nane from other experts such as “Pohakuopele,” Ka Naita Ilihune, Makaikiu Hene, and other highly skilled ones.

He was well known amongst the ones who answered nane by the name of Kawaikaumaiikamakaokaopua i ka Pali Kapu o Keoua.

He was a writer for the Hoku o Hawaii during the life of Rev. S. L. (Kiwini) Desha, Sr., and he was adept as a writer. Who would not be without knowledge who were taught in Hawaii’s schools in those days. How mournful is his passing.

He had good eyesight, and during his life, he didn’t read with glasses.

On the afternoon of the following Wednesday, his funeral was held in Haili Church by the Rev. Moses Moku, and his body was taken to rest in the cemetery of Homelani.

His toiling is over; his work here is over, and his spirit with the one who made all people.

O Kona of the sea of cloud banks in the calm of Ehu, you will not see again Kalokuokamaile for all times; he has gone on the path of no return. O People of Napoopoo, no more, no more will you see again your father, Z. P. Kaloku, for all times; you will no more hear his beckoning voice.

O Expert seekers of things obscure, you will no more see the name Kawaikaumaiikamakaokaopua; you will no more see his answers to newly published riddles; and no more will you see his solutions to riddles for all times. The golden chain of his life has been severed, for man’s life is a vapour that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away. O Pohakuopele, here is your father; he has glided over the path of all men.

Ka Hoku o Hawaii joins in the family in mourning for him, for their loved one who left this earthly life.

MAY GOD LIGHTEN YOUR SORROW.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/9/1942, p. 2)

He Kanaka Ua Hala Iho Nei

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVII, Number 20, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 9, 1942.

Goat hunting on Kahoolawe, 1911.

Goat Hunters to go to Kahoolawe.

Aboard the Maunaloa of this Friday, Governor Frear, Attorney General Lindsey [Lindsay], and Land Commissioner Alapaki opio [Charles Sheldon Judd] left for the island of Hawaii to look at the homestead lands there. On this trip, the Governor took along an automobile for them to travel mauka side of Hawaii. They get off at Kailua and get on the car to go to Kau, and from there to the volcano until Hilo and from there to Kohala until Waimea, and in two weeks the Maunakea will be there in Kawaihae and they will return to Honolulu nei. On this tour of the Governor and his companions, they will meet with the…

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, p. 1)

NA POE KI KAO NO KAHOOLAWE.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

makaainana who want homestead lands, to ask them first-hand what lands the public desires.

Attorney General Lindsey and Alapaki will make the return trip to Honolulu while Governor Frear will get off at Lahaina, and there meet up with Eben Low, Kuhio, and Kiwini [S. L. Desha], as well as with some other people, to go to Kahoolawe to judge the damages done by the goats, and if they are found at fault, shooting will be their punishment.

The long-distance steamship, the Kaena, will go to Lahaina on the 21st of this month, and by the Kaena the selected jury will go to Kahoolawe.

[See this related story, “Brother Low Recalls 1895–1920” on Hamakua Times’ website!]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, pp. 4)

KA POE KI KAO

Kuokoa Homer Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

Kaahumanu Society Chapter V of Kona a century old! 1913 / 2013.

KAAHUMANU SOCIETY ESTABLISHED.

At 3:30 p. m. on Sunday, and through the kindness of Rev. E. S. Timoteo of the Church of Kealakekua, he allowed the coconut frond lanai of his home to hold the meeting to establish the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu] of the calm of Kona.

The members of the various branches of Kohala, Waimea, Hamakua, Laupahoehoe and the society of the famous rain of Hilo Hanakahi; they were members who came for duties of the Evangelical Association [Ahahui Euanelio], Sunday School Association [Ahahui Kula Sabati], and Christian Endeavor Association [Ahahui C. E.].

The meeting was presided over by the head president of the Parent Association of Honolulu, Miss Lucy K. Peabody, and the secretary of that parent association, Mrs. Lahilahi Webb took the minutes of the meeting.

The meeting was begun with the singing of the hymn, “Kuu aina hanau e” and a prayer given by S. L. Desha.  The proclamation was read by Mrs. Lahilahi Webb for the establishment of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five at Napoopoo, South Kona, Hawaii, and at the completion of the reading of the text of the proclamation from the parent association of Honolulu, the establishing members of the new Association, Chapter Five, was made known.

There were twenty members who signed the membership book, and in that way, the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five was started; and at that time, an election was held to choose the officers of this association whose names are below:

Mrs. Esther Baker, president; Mrs. Kealoha Kamauoha, vice president; Miss Maggie Hooper, treasurer; Miss Sarah Kamauoha, secretary; Mrs. Lydia Kekuewa, vice secretary; Mrs. Kaai, auditor; and Mrs. Emily Haae,  committee of the whole [? komite nui].

After the election of the officers was over, all the members of the many associations stood along with the new members of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five, and the new members were adorned with paper lei, and at that time the members of Chapter Three of Hilo sang the song “Ka Lei o Kaahumanu.”

When that truly lovely song was being sung, the members were filled with awe and tears welled up in some, and the two mothers who established this junior Kaahumanu society felt that this was perhaps one of the most awe-inspiring initiations seen;  and after the song was over, the new association was blessed with a prayer by the brother of the Ahahui Kaahumanu, Rev. S. J. Desha of the Church of Haili, the one who is a great help to the efforts of the mothers of this association.

The money donated for the treasury of this new association was 27.75.

The sisters of the Kaahumanu committees who arrived and participated in the activities were these below:

Mrs. Hattie Hapai, the honorary president of the association of Hilo; Mrs. Alai Akana, president of the Association of Hilo; Mrs. Beke Keliikahi, secretary of Hilo; Mrs. Sarah Kaiwi, Mrs. Mary Kahenui, Mrs. Elena Mahaiula, Mrs. Helela, and Miss Kaimi Mahaiula, member of Hilo; Mrs. Emma Laeha, president of the association of Laupahoehoe, Mrs. Kealalaina Ne, from the association of Kohala, as well as Mr. Annie Hussey. Mrs. Becky Kawai and Mrs. Eliza Maguire from the association of Waimea, Mrs. Esther K. Haina, secretary of the association of Hamakua; Mrs. Kelalaina Robikana, Mrs. Haili Timoteo and Mrs. Bessie Kopa, from the parent association of Honolulu.

There were letters from Mrs. Aima Nawahi and Mrs. J. Saffery, the president of the Kaahumanu Society of Hamakua, expressing to their sisters of their aloha and of their support for this endeavor.

As for the two of us, the mothers who came to endorse this endeavor, we extend our unending thanks to the officers and members of the Evangelical association of the Island of Hawaii for their generosity in allowing us time to carry out our work for which we travelled over the ocean.

We also give our appreciation to the good kamaaina, Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Kamauoha, for their very kind hospitality in their comfortable home; and the head of the Church, Rev. E. S. Timoteo and his amiable wife, and we extend our thanks to the members of all the associations which joined in to help us for the good of the junior association of the calm of Kona. We also thank the brother of the Kaahumanu members, Rev. S. L. Desha, for his great assistance, as well as to our good sister: Mrs. Aima Nawahi for her assistance in planning to move the endeavor forward; and we also extend our thoughts of aloha and unending blessings to our kind kamaaina who lent her car to take us to where our duties took us, that being Mrs. Kelalaina Robikana of Honolulu.

We pray to our Heavenly Father to give great blessings upon us all; and we hope that with the assistance of benevolent God that you younger sisters of Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five  will move forward, and your works will progress, and may the sisterly love amongst us all last forever.

The two of us,

Lucy K. Peabody, president of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter 1.

Lahilahi Webb, Secretary.

March 31, 1913.

(Kuokoa, 4/11/1913, p. 2)

KU KA AHAHUI KAAHUMANU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 14, Aoao 2. Aperila 11, 1913.