Travels of King Kamehameha IV to see the sounding sands of Nohili and more, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

We hear of the sailing of the King from here, and on the next day he landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night, he sailed to Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They spent the Sabbath there, and joined together and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the weekday, the rode horse, fished; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. That evening, they got on board the Maria and sailed for Kaula. The next morning they reached there. Some of them jumped into the ocean and swam ashore with difficulty, for there was a shark there and it was difficult to go ashore; there is a severe cliff and no bay. The King went ashore amongst these difficulties, ascended the cliff. The chiefesses remained on the ship. Continue reading

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Queen Victoria’s letter to King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emalani, 1863.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

The Letter of Victoria to the Hawaiian Monarchs.—It was  made known to some of us, the letter of Queen Victoria to our beloved Monarchs, showing her sadness and he compassion for the misfortune that befell the Alii Haku o Hawaii, the greatly loved one who was taken away by gracious God. Continue reading

Hula at Queen Emma’s birthday celebration, 1875.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Birthday of Queen Emma.—This past Saturday, Queen Emma Kaleleonalani observed her birthday at her Residence, and there were many people who went to watch the entertainment of the day and to indulge in all the food from the great Table filled through her generosity;

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Eo, e Kaleleonalani! 1874.

Mr. Editor—We all know what the Hawaiian hula is, even in its least objectionable form. Say what we can by way of apology for it, it remains after all, a miserable relic of barbarism, the preservation of which and its encouragement by the chiefs is unfavorable to the growth of pure morals among the people. Continue reading